Women’s History

Explore the topics below to learn about Women’s History through newspaper articles and clippings.

Amelia Earhart, 1937

Amelia Earhart

Amelia Mary Earhart (born July 24, 1897) was an American aviator whose record-setting career would make her the most famous female pilot in history. During an attempt to circumnavigate the globe in 1937, she disappeared over the Pacific Ocean and was never seen again. In December 1920, pilot Frank Hawks gave Earhart a plane ride that …Read More

Audrey Hepburn, circa 1956

Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn (born Audrey Kathleen Ruston; 4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993) was a British actress, model, dancer and humanitarian. Recognised as a film and fashion icon, Hepburn was active during Hollywood’s Golden Age. She was ranked by the American Film Institute as the third-greatest female screen legend in Golden Age Hollywood and was …Read More

Bonnie and Clyde, circa 1932-1934

Bonnie and Clyde

Bonnie Elizabeth Parker (October 1, 1910 – May 23, 1934) and Clyde Chestnut Barrow also known as Clyde Champion Barrow (March 24, 1909 – May 23, 1934) were American criminals who traveled the central United States with their gang during the Great Depression, robbing people and killing when cornered or confronted. Their exploits captured the …Read More

National U.S. women's soccer team practices for World Cup match

FIFA Women’s World Cup

The FIFA Women’s World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women’s national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport’s global governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women’s World Championship, was held …Read More

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross, c. 1822– March 10, 1913) was an American abolitionist and political activist. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made some thirteen missions to rescue approximately seventy enslaved people, family and friends, using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped abolitionist John …Read More

Helen Keller, circa 1907

Helen Keller

Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deaf-blind person to earn a bachelor of arts degree.  A prolific author, Keller was well-traveled and outspoken in her convictions. A member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of …Read More

Rosa Parks, circa 1955

Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an African American civil rights activist best known for her role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Born Rosa Louise McCauley in Tuskegee, Alabama, Rosa Parks grew up living with her mother and grandparents in Pine Level, Alabama. She was forced to quit school at age …Read More

Women's Suffrage Picket Parade

U.S. Women’s Suffrage

Women’s suffrage in the United States of America, the legal right of women to vote, was established over the course of several decades, first in various states and localities, sometimes on a limited basis, and then nationally in 1920. The demand for women’s suffrage began to gather strength in the 1840s, emerging from the broader …Read More