Progressive Era

The Progressive Era (1890s-1920s) was an attempt to respond to the social and economic problems of the Gilded Age through activism and reform. Initially a social movement, it eventually grew into a political movement as well, addressing issues such as poverty, corruption, poor work conditions, alcohol abuse, and the disenfranchisement of women.

Explore the topics below to learn more about this period through newspaper articles and clippings.

19th Amendment

19th Amendment

The 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was adopted on August 26, 1920. The main section states, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” 19th-Century Efforts Early national-level efforts for women’s rights were …Read More

Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol

Prohibition

The Prohibition Era was a period between 1920 and 1933 when the 18th Amendment to the Constitution was in effect. This amendment prohibited the manufacture, sale, and transport of alcohol in the United States. For decades leading up to the passage of the 18th Amendment, reform groups within the temperance movement had worked to eliminate …Read More

Susan B. Anthony

Susan B. Anthony

Susan B. Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906) was a social activist and reformer; she particularly fought for women’s suffrage but was also involved in other causes, such as temperance, abolition, and labor rights. Early Life Anthony was born in Adams, Massachusetts, as the second of seven children of Daniel and Lucy Anthony. …Read More

Women's Suffrage Picket Parade

U.S. Women’s Suffrage

The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified on August 18, 1920, giving American women the right to vote in all state and federal elections. Background Women’s suffrage in America was a divisive issue from the very beginning of the organized movement at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848. Over the ensuing 72 years, …Read More