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Tuskegee Airmen, circa 1942-43

Tuskegee Airmen

The Tuskegee Airmen were African American pilots, crew, and personnel associated with the Army flight training school in Tuskegee, Alabama, during World War II. The best known of these units were the 99th Pursuit (Fighter) Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, and 477th Bombardment (Composite) Group. Background Prior to the Tuskegee Airmen, no African Americans had been …Read More

Newspaper with Double V Campaign news (Pittsburgh Courier, via Newspapers.com)

Double V Campaign

The Double V Campaign was an African American initiative, led by the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper, that aimed to achieve a double victory (“Double V”) during World War II. The two objectives were victory in the war abroad and victory against discrimination on the home front. How did it start? The inspiration for the campaign came …Read More

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross, c. 1822– March 10, 1913) was an American abolitionist and political activist. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made some thirteen missions to rescue approximately seventy enslaved people, family and friends, using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped abolitionist John …Read More

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'Behind The Headlines of History' podcast, Season 2, Episode 5

S2 Ep5: A (Peaky?) Blinder of Gangster story and a Fertile Centenarian

Michala transports us back to the world of 1920s Birmingham gangland this week, and if you’re a Peaky Blinders fan, some of the names in her newspaper article (from The Times, 28 April 1921) may be familiar…Then, not to be outdone, Brad unpicks the eye-opening headline ‘Man Aged 130 has son 4 And a Wife …Read More

S2 Ep4: Man Haunted by Dead Mother, and a Robbery With a Twist

We’re hopping across the Atlantic for this week’s episode – that’s right, all our stories this week are sourced from newspapers in the USA. And there are some corkers hidden in that American newsprint. Whilst Brad doesn’t believe in ghosts, the subject of his story – Mr Frank Swulius – certainly did; the spooky actions …Read More

'Behind The Headlines of History' podcast, Season 2, Episode 3

Season 2 Episode 3: WWII Special – The First Civilian Casualty of WWII and ‘Mend and Make Do’ in the Air

This year marks a number of notable World War II (WWII) anniversaries, most significantly, the 75th anniversary of VE Day – when combat ended in Europe. With this in mind, all our stories in this episode are WWII themed – giving insight into the lives of not just those that served but also the impact …Read More

Season 2 Episode 2: Victimisation of Winston Churchill’s Mother and a Prison Break!

Our hosts have served up a couple of Victorian chancers for your listening pleasure in today’s episode. Brad’s headline ‘Alleged Frauds on Ladies’ (from the Daily News, 5th October 1897) takes us into the world of fraudster who scammed Winston Churchill’s mother and Michala’s story (reported in Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper, 6th January 1850) follows the …Read More

'Behind The Headlines of History' podcast, Season 2, Episode 1

Season 2 Episode 1: Murders Most Horrid and (Almost) Killer Lemonade

Behind The Headlines of History is back for another season – and we couldn’t be more delighted to be sharing more weird and wonderful tales from the newstands of history with you! Michala is kicking off season two with a grisly story of the first private hanging (from the Liverpool Mercury, 15th August 1858) but …Read More

Behind The Headlines of History podcast: Christmas Special

Christmas Special: Mock Marriages & The Great Christmas Coat Robbery

We’re back in your ears for a Christmas special of Behind The Headlines of History! All our stories in this episode have a seasonal slant, although perhaps not in the way you’d expect… Take a listen to discover the festive resonance of Brad’s headline: ‘Alleged Mock Marriage’ (from the Western Mail on December 24th, 1890) …Read More

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