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FBI sketch of D.B. Cooper

D.B. Cooper Hijacking

On November 24, 1971, a man going by the pseudonym Dan Cooper bought a one-way ticket for a flight between Portland and Seattle. During the flight he informed a flight attendant that he had a bomb. The man requested that he be given $200,000 in cash and 4 parachutes. When the airplane landed in Seattle, …Read More

Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol

Prohibition

The Prohibition Era was a period between 1920 and 1933 when the 18th Amendment to the Constitution was in effect. This amendment prohibited the manufacture, sale, and transport of alcohol in the United States. For decades leading up to Prohibition, reform groups within the temperance movement had worked to eliminate alcohol consumption, which they believed …Read More

Ted Kennedy in 1962

Chappaquiddick Incident

On July 18, 1969, Senator Edward “Ted” Kennedy accidentally drove a car off a bridge on Chappaquiddick Island, Massachusetts; he survived, but his passenger, 28-year-old Mary Jo Kopechne, died in the accident. On the night of the incident, Kennedy and Kopechne left a party on Chappaquiddick Island together after 11 p.m. in a car driven …Read More

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Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1933

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Sr. (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945. A Democrat, he won a record four presidential elections and became a central …Read More

Newspaper headlines announcing the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott (Asbury Park Press, via Newspapers.com)

Montgomery Bus Boycott

The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a political and social protest campaign against the policy of racial segregation on the public transit system of Montgomery, Alabama. It was a seminal event in the Civil Rights Movement. The campaign lasted from December 5, 1955—the Monday after Rosa Parks, an African American woman, was arrested for refusing to …Read More

The West Berlin side of the Berlin Wall, 1989

Berlin Wall

The Berlin Wall (German: Berliner Mauer) was a guarded concrete barrier that physically and ideologically divided Berlin from 1961 to 1989. Constructed by the German Democratic Republic (GDR, East Germany), starting on 13 August 1961, the Wall cut off (by land) West Berlin from virtually all of surrounding East Germany and East Berlin until government …Read More

Japanese Americans arrive by train to await internment processing in California

Internment of Japanese Americans

The internment of Japanese Americans in the United States during World War II was the forced relocation and incarceration in camps in the western interior of the country of between 110,000 and 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry, most of whom lived on the Pacific coast. Sixty-two percent of the internees were United States citizens. These …Read More

US Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan, sole dissenter in Plessy v. Ferguson decision

Plessy v. Ferguson

Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 (1896), was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court issued in 1896. It upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities as long as the segregated facilities were equal in quality – a doctrine that came to be known as “separate but equal”. This legitimized the …Read More

Rosa Parks, circa 1955

Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an African American civil rights activist best known for her role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Born Rosa Louise McCauley in Tuskegee, Alabama, Rosa Parks grew up living with her mother and grandparents in Pine Level, Alabama. She was forced to quit school at age …Read More

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