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Unemployed men at a soup kitchen during the Great Depression, 1936

Great Depression

The Great Depression was a global economic depression that in the United States lasted from 1929 to roughly 1939. It started in the United States and spread to other countries around the world, particularly in Europe. The “Black Tuesday” stock market crash of October 29, 1929, marked the beginning of the Great Depression. But there were …Read More

Martin Luther King Jr., 1964

Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was a leading figure in the American civil rights movement noted for his support of non-violence and civil disobedience. King was born in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1929. In 1955, while working as a Baptist minister in Montgomery, Alabama, he led a successful year-long boycott of the city’s segregated bus lines. In …Read More

Immigrants arriving at Ellis Island, 1915

Ellis Island

What Is Ellis Island? Ellis Island was the main U.S. immigration center between 1892 and 1954, when it closed. It is located in Upper New York Bay, off the shore of New Jersey. During the 62 years it operated, more than 12 million immigrants were processed on the island. Opening of Ellis Island Home to …Read More

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Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali) wins heavyweight boxing championship, 1964 (The Detroit Free Press, via Newspapers.com)

Muhammad Ali

Muhammad Ali (born Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr.; January 17, 1942 – June 3, 2016) was an American professional boxer, activist, and philanthropist. Nicknamed “The Greatest”, he is widely regarded as one of the most significant and celebrated sports figures of the 20th century and one of the greatest boxers of all time. Wikipedia Learn more …Read More

The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the March on Washington, or The Great March on Washington, was held in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. The purpose of the march was to advocate for the civil and economic rights of African Americans. At the march, Martin Luther King Jr., standing in front …Read More

“Into the Jaws of Death — U.S. Troops wading through water and Nazi gunfire,” by Robert F. Sargent

D-Day (Normandy Landings)

The Normandy landings were the landing operations on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. Codenamed Operation Neptune and often referred to as D-Day, it was the largest seaborne invasion in history. The operation began the liberation of German-occupied France (and later Europe) from Nazi …Read More

Temporary hospital in California for Spanish flu victims, 1918

1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic

The 1918 influenza pandemic (January 1918 – December 1920; colloquially known as Spanish flu) was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic, the first of the two pandemics involving H1N1 influenza virus. It infected 500 million people around the world, including people on remote Pacific islands and in the Arctic, and resulted in the deaths of 50 …Read More

Headlines announcing Nixon's resignation following the Watergate scandal (The Morning News, via Newspapers.com)

Watergate Scandal

The Watergate scandal was a major political scandal that occurred in the United States during the early 1970s, following a break-in by five men at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. on June 17, 1972, and President Richard Nixon’s administration’s subsequent attempt to cover up its involvement. …Read More

Berliners watching a C-54 land during Berlin Airlift, 1948

Berlin Airlift

The Western Allies organized the Berlin airlift (26 June 1948–30 September 1949) to carry supplies to the people of West Berlin, a difficult feat given the size of the city’s population. Aircrews from the United States Air Force, the Royal Air Force, the French Air Force, the Royal Canadian Air Force, the Royal Australian Air …Read More

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