World History in Newspapers

Explore the topics below to learn about events in World History through newspaper articles and clippings.

"Company of Boxers, Tien-Tsin, China" 1901

Boxer Rebellion

The Boxer Rebellion, Boxer Uprising, or Yihetuan Movement was an anti-foreign, anti-colonial, and anti-Christian uprising that took place in China between 1899 and 1901, toward the end of the Qing dynasty. They were motivated by proto-nationalist sentiments and by opposition to Western colonialism and the Christian missionary activity that was associated with it. Wikipedia Learn …Read More

Chernobyl Disaster newspaper headline (The Morning Call via Newspapers.com)

Chernobyl Disaster

On April 26, 1986, a Soviet nuclear power plant near Chernobyl, Ukraine, became the site of the most disastrous nuclear accident in history, when it experienced explosions at one of its reactors. Disaster In the early hours of April 26, a planned simulation of an electrical power outage resulted in an uncontrolled nuclear reaction at …Read More

A street view following the Halifax Explosion in 1917

Halifax Explosion

On the morning of December 6, 1917, two ships collided in Halifax Harbor, Nova Scotia, resulting in a massive blast that ultimately killed 2,000 people in the largest man-made explosion prior to the atomic age. Background Halifax was a wartime boomtown during World War I, and ships loaded with troops, munitions, and supplies sailed in …Read More

"An Irish Peasant Family Discovering the Blight of their Store," by Daniel MacDonald, c. 1847

Irish Potato Famine

The Great Famine (Irish: an Gorta Mór) or the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation, disease, and emigration in Ireland between 1845 and 1849. With the greatest impacted areas to the west and south of Ireland. During the famine, about one million people died and a million more emigrated from Ireland, causing the …Read More

Artists rendering of "a suspicious character" during Jack the Ripper era in London

Jack the Ripper

Jack the Ripper is the name given to an unknown person who, in the fall of 1888, murdered at least five women in London’s Whitechapel district. His identity has never been uncovered, and his case remains one of the most famous unsolved criminal mysteries in history. Murder in Whitechapel Though as many as eleven murders …Read More

Howard Carter studies Tutankhamun's sarcophagus, 1922

King Tut’s Tomb

King Tut’s Tomb is the burial place of the young king of ancient Egypt, Tutankhamun. Tutankhamun Known as the “boy king,” Tutankhamun reigned from 1333 to 1323 BCE, coming to rule when he was less than ten years old. Though an unexpected early death at age 19 cut his reign short, the discovery of his …Read More

Lake Nyos, 1986

Lake Nyos Disaster

On August 21, 1986, a rare natural disaster occurred in the West African country of Cameroon when a large cloud of carbon dioxide gas erupted from Lake Nyos (Nios), a deep volcanic crater lake.  Background The event, known as a limnic eruption, occurs when carbon dioxide (CO2) builds in colder, deep lake water, creating a …Read More

Opening of the League of Nations, 1920

League of Nations

The League of Nations (1920-1946) was an international organization headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, created after World War I to establish world peace and prevent another global war. Creation of the League The onset and escalation of World War I built support in many countries for the creation of a multinational body to ensure world peace. One …Read More

Marie Curie

Marie Curie

Marie Curie (7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934) was a Polish-born French physicist and chemist who made landmark discoveries about radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize and the first person to win a Nobel Prize twice. Early Life & Education Curie was born Maria Sklodowska in 1867 in Warsaw, …Read More