Featured Topics

Australian troops charging near a Turkish trench during the Gallipoli Campaign, circa 1915

Gallipoli Campaign

The Gallipoli Campaign (also called the Dardanelles Campaign) was a World War I Allied offensive on the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey. It lasted February 17, 1915, through January 9, 1916, and was ultimately unsuccessful, ending in high casualties and evacuation. Background With trench warfare causing stagnation on the Western Front, the British and French decided …Read More

Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton (born January 11, 1755/57; died July 12, 1804) was one of America’s Founding Fathers. A proponent of a strong central government, Hamilton shaped the early economic infrastructure and policies of the United States. Revolutionary War Born in the British West Indies, Alexander Hamilton moved to the United States in 1772. During the American …Read More

Jackie Robinson, 1954

Jackie Robinson

Jack Roosevelt Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) was born in Cairo, Georgia, but grew up in southern California. He attended UCLA, where he participated in football, basketball, track, and baseball. From 1942 to 1944, during World War II, Robinson served with the U.S. Army. Afterward, he briefly played baseball for the Negro …Read More

Recently Added Topics - Page 2

19th Amendment

19th Amendment

The 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was adopted on August 26, 1920. The main section states, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” 19th-Century Efforts Early national-level efforts for women’s rights were …Read More

Emancipation Day in Richmond, Virginia, circa 1905

Juneteenth

Juneteenth is an annual holiday commemorating the announcement of emancipation in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865. More broadly, it celebrates the effective end of slavery in the United States.  History of Juneteenth Freedom from slavery happened sporadically throughout the Civil War as Union troops claimed outlying Confederate territory or as enslaved people escaped to …Read More

Decoration Day parade held in Nome, Alaska, sometime between 1900 and 1910

Memorial Day

Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday for the purpose of honoring and remembering those who have died while serving in the armed forces. It is celebrated annually on the last Monday in May.  Early Observances The first concept of Memorial Day began in the years following the American Civil War. Where it began …Read More

Allied troops on the beach at Dunkirk waiting for evacuation

Dunkirk Evacuation

Code-named Operation Dynamo, the Dunkirk Evacuation took place May 26 to June 4, 1940, during World War II as part of the Battle of France. During the operation, more than 338,000 Allied troops were successfully evacuated from the beach at Dunkirk (Dunkerque) following the German invasion of France.  Background When Germany invaded Belgium and the …Read More

V-E Day newspaper front page (Boston Daily Globe, via Newspapers.com)

Victory in Europe Day (V-E Day)

Victory in Europe Day (V-E Day, May 8 or May 9, 1945) marked Nazi Germany’s unconditional surrender during World War II and the end of the war in Europe.  War in Europe Ends News of the end of the war in Europe had been expected for some time, and after Hitler’s suicide at the end …Read More

Marie Curie

Marie Curie

Marie Curie (7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934) was a Polish-born French physicist and chemist who made landmark discoveries about radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize and the first person to win a Nobel Prize twice. Early Life & Education Curie was born Maria Sklodowska in 1867 in Warsaw, …Read More

Browse Categories