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Emancipation Day in Richmond, Virginia, circa 1905

Juneteenth

Juneteenth is an annual holiday commemorating the announcement of emancipation in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865. More broadly, it celebrates the effective end of slavery in the United States.  History of Juneteenth Freedom from slavery happened sporadically throughout the Civil War as Union troops claimed outlying Confederate territory or as enslaved people escaped to …Read More

“Into the Jaws of Death — U.S. Troops wading through water and Nazi gunfire,” by Robert F. Sargent

D-Day (Normandy Landings)

The Normandy landings of Operation Overlord during World War II—codenamed Operation Neptune but most commonly known as D-Day—took place on June 6, 1944. On this day, approximately 156,000 Allied troops crossed the English Channel in a massive amphibious military assault, breaking through the Germans’ extensively fortified Atlantic Wall to begin the invasion of German-occupied France. …Read More

Helen Keller, circa 1907

Helen Keller

Summary Helen Keller (born June 27, 1880; died June 1, 1968) was an activist and author. Blind and deaf herself, Keller was a passionate advocate for persons with disabilities. Early Life Helen Adams Keller was born in Alabama in 1880. At 19 months old, she lost her sight and hearing due to a serious illness …Read More

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Opening of the League of Nations, 1920

League of Nations

The League of Nations (1920-1946) was an international organization headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, created after World War I to establish world peace and prevent another global war. Creation of the League The onset and escalation of World War I built support in many countries for the creation of a multinational body to ensure world peace. One …Read More

Electoral College map from 1896

U.S. Electoral College

The president and vice president of the United States are elected through the U.S. Electoral College, which is outlined in Article II, Section 1, of the U.S. Constitution. The Electoral College is composed of “electors” chosen by the voters of each state (plus Washington DC) to cast their state’s electoral votes in a presidential election. …Read More

St. Louis Giants, 1916 - Negro Leagues Baseball

“Negro Leagues” Baseball

The “Negro leagues” were organized circuits for professional Black baseball teams, functioning most successfully between 1920 through the 1940s in the United States’ East, Midwest, and South. Early History After the American Civil War, baseball became increasingly popular in the United States, and professional teams and leagues began to emerge. Initially, there were some instances …Read More

USS Indianapolis (CA-35) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 10 July 1945. US Navy photo 19-N-86911.

USS Indianapolis

The USS Indianapolis was a U.S. Navy cruiser that was torpedoed and sunk on July 30, 1945, shortly after delivering components of the atomic bomb. The sinking and aftermath led to the deaths of 880 men.  Construction The Indianapolis was a Portland-class cruiser constructed in 1931 and commissioned by the U.S. Navy the following year. …Read More

American servicemen and women in Paris to celebrate V-J Day, August 15, 1945

Victory over Japan Day (V-J Day)

Victory over Japan Day (V-J Day) commemorates the announcement of Japan’s surrender at the end of World War II. Coming 3 months after Victory in Europe Day, V-J Day signaled the effective conclusion of the war in the Pacific and of World War II overall. It is typically observed on August 15, though the United …Read More

19th Amendment

19th Amendment

The 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was adopted on August 26, 1920. The main section states, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” 19th-Century Efforts Early national-level efforts for women’s rights were …Read More

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