Women’s History - Page 2

Explore the topics below to learn about Women’s History through newspaper articles and clippings.

Madam C.J. Walker

Madam C.J. Walker

Madam C.J. Walker (December 23, 1867 – May 25, 1919) was a businesswoman and philanthropist who was also the first Black woman self-made millionaire. Early Life Born Sarah Breedlove in 1867 on a cotton plantation near Delta, Louisiana, Walker was the daughter of formerly enslaved parents. Orphaned at just 7 years old, she married at …Read More

Marie Curie

Marie Curie

Marie Curie (7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934) was a Polish-born French physicist and chemist who made landmark discoveries about radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize and the first person to win a Nobel Prize twice. Early Life & Education Curie was born Maria Sklodowska in 1867 in Warsaw, …Read More

Queen Victoria

Queen Victoria

Victoria (born May 24, 1819; died January 22, 1901) was queen of the United Kingdom between 1837 and 1901 and Empress of India from 1876 onwards. Her reign lasted 63 years, longer than that of any of her predecessors. Early Years Born Alexandrina Victoria, the future queen was raised largely in isolation by her mother …Read More

Rosa Parks, circa 1955

Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was a civil rights activist best known for her role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Born Rosa Louise McCauley in Tuskegee, Alabama, Rosa Parks grew up living with her mother and grandparents in Pine Level, Alabama. She was forced to quit school at age 16 to …Read More

Susan B. Anthony

Susan B. Anthony

Susan B. Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906) was a social activist and reformer; she particularly fought for women’s suffrage but was also involved in other causes, such as temperance, abolition, and labor rights. Early Life Anthony was born in Adams, Massachusetts, as the second of seven children of Daniel and Lucy Anthony. …Read More

Women's Suffrage Picket Parade

U.S. Women’s Suffrage

The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified on August 18, 1920, giving American women the right to vote in all state and federal elections. Background Women’s suffrage in America was a divisive issue from the very beginning of the organized movement at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848. Over the ensuing 72 years, …Read More