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American servicemen and women in Paris to celebrate V-J Day, August 15, 1945

Victory over Japan Day (V-J Day)

Victory over Japan Day (V-J Day) commemorates the announcement of Japan’s surrender at the end of World War II. Coming 3 months after Victory in Europe Day, V-J Day signaled the effective conclusion of the war in the Pacific and of World War II overall. It is typically observed on August 15, though the United …Read More

19th Amendment

19th Amendment

The 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was adopted on August 26, 1920. The main section states, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” 19th-Century Efforts Early national-level efforts for women’s rights were …Read More

The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the March on Washington, or The Great March on Washington, was held in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. The purpose of the march was to advocate for the civil and economic rights of African Americans. At the march, Martin Luther King Jr., standing in front …Read More

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Geronimo, 1887

Geronimo

Geronimo (June 1829 – February 17, 1909) was a Native American resistance leader from the Bedonkohe band of the Chiricahua Apache tribe. He was best known for leading his warriors on violent raids against Mexican and U.S. targets and for escaping confinement on the Apache reservation multiple times. Geronimo (Native American name Goyathlay) was born …Read More

Unemployed men at a soup kitchen during the Great Depression, 1936

Great Depression

The Great Depression was a global economic depression that in the United States lasted from 1929 to roughly 1939. It started in the United States and spread to other countries around the world, particularly in Europe. The “Black Tuesday” stock market crash of October 29, 1929, marked the beginning of the Great Depression. But there were …Read More

Jackie Robinson, 1954

Jackie Robinson

Jack Roosevelt Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) was born in Cairo, Georgia, but grew up in southern California. He attended UCLA, where he participated in football, basketball, track, and baseball. From 1942 to 1944, during World War II, Robinson served with the U.S. Army. Afterward, he briefly played baseball for the Negro …Read More

Josephine Baker dancing the Charleston, 1926

Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance was an American Black cultural movement that started in the years following World War I and ended in the mid-1930s. It was most vibrant during the 1920s and was centered in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. This period saw an explosion in Black cultural arts such as music, literature, poetry, …Read More

Cesar Chavez, 1976

César Chavez

César Chavez (March 31, 1927 – April 23, 1993) was a Mexican-American union leader, labor organizer, and civil rights activist who is best known for his efforts to improve working conditions for migrant farm workers in California, Texas, Arizona, and Florida. During his childhood, Chavez moved with his family from Arizona to California, where they …Read More

"The Death of General Warren at the Battle of Bunker's Hill, June 17,1775," by John Trumbull

Battle of Bunker Hill

The Battle of Bunker Hill, which took place on June 17, 1775, was the first major battle of the American Revolutionary War. The main commanders were Major General William Howe on the British side, and Colonel William Prescott on the Americans’. The British were under siege in Boston, Massachusetts, so they planned to take the …Read More

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