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Paratroops landing in the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden in September 1944

Operation Market Garden

Operation Market Garden was an unsuccessful British-American airborne invasion of the Netherlands (Holland) during World War II that lasted September 17-25, 1944. It was the largest airborne operation of the war, involving more than 34,000 airborne troops. Background Operation Market Garden was intended to advance the Allies across the Rhine River into Germany’s industrial heartland. …Read More

Battle of Yorktown: "Surrender of Lord Cornwallis," by John Trumbull

Battle of Yorktown

The Battle of Yorktown (September 28 – October 19, 1781; also called the Siege of Yorktown) was the last major land battle of the American Revolutionary War. After almost 2 weeks of being under siege, the British troops at Yorktown, Virginia, surrendered to combined American and French forces, signaling the beginning of the end of …Read More

Wreckage from the Galveston, Texas, Hurricane in 1900

1900 Galveston Hurricane

Summary On September 8, 1900, Galveston, Texas, was struck by a category 4 hurricane that decimated the island and killed thousands of people, making it the deadliest natural disaster in U.S. history. Great Galveston Hurricane The day before the hurricane struck, heavy swells were noticed in the Gulf, and by the early morning of the …Read More

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Artists rendering of "a suspicious character" during Jack the Ripper era in London

Jack the Ripper

Jack the Ripper is the name given to an unknown person who, in the fall of 1888, murdered at least five women in London’s Whitechapel district. His identity has never been uncovered, and his case remains one of the most famous unsolved criminal mysteries in history. Murder in Whitechapel Though as many as eleven murders …Read More

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross, c. 1822– March 10, 1913) was an American abolitionist and political activist. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made some thirteen missions to rescue approximately seventy enslaved people, family and friends, using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped abolitionist John …Read More

Bonnie and Clyde, circa 1932-1934

Bonnie and Clyde

Background Both Clyde Barrow (March 24, 1909 – May 23, 1934) and Bonnie Parker (October 1, 1910 – May 23, 1934) grew up in the slums of Dallas, Texas, but while Clyde ended up on the wrong side of the law by his teen years, Bonnie seemed to stay out of trouble. The two met …Read More

Wright brothers, 1910

Wright Brothers

The Wright brothers, Orville (August 19, 1871 – January 30, 1948) and Wilbur (April 16, 1867 – May 30, 1912), were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world’s first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft …Read More

General Douglas MacArthur, 1945

Douglas MacArthur

Douglas MacArthur (26 January 1880 – 5 April 1964) was an American five-star general and Field Marshal of the Philippine Army. He was Chief of Staff of the United States Army during the 1930s and played a prominent role in the Pacific theater during World War II. He received the Medal of Honor for his …Read More

Lizzie Borden, 1889

Lizzie Borden

Elizabeth “Lizzie” Andrew Borden (July 19, 1860 – June 1, 1927) was an American woman who is best known for being the main suspect in the 1892 axe murders of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. Borden was tried and acquitted of the murders. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts elected not to charge anyone …Read More

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