Navajo Code Talkers

Navajo U.S. Marine Corps code-talker recruits being sworn in at Fort Wingate

Navajo U.S. Marine Corps code-talker recruits being sworn in at Fort Wingate

Code talkers are people in the 20th century who used obscure languages as a means of secret communication during wartime. The term is now usually associated with the United States service members during the world wars who used their knowledge of Native American languages as a basis to transmit coded messages. In particular, there were approximately 400–500 Native Americans in the United States Marine Corps whose primary job was the transmission of secret tactical messages. Code talkers transmitted these messages over military telephone or radio communications nets using formal or informally developed codes built upon their native languages. Their service improved the speed of encryption of communications at both ends in front line operations during World War II.

The name code talkers is strongly associated with bilingual Navajo speakers specially recruited during World War II by the Marines to serve in their standard communications units in the Pacific Theater. Code talking, however, was pioneered by the Cherokee and Choctaw peoples during World War I. Wikipedia

Learn more about Navajo Code Talkers through historical newspapers from our archives. Explore newspaper articles, headlines, images, and other primary sources below.


Articles and Clippings about Navajo Code Talkers

"Navajo Code Talkers," Newspapers.com Topics (https://www.newspapers.com/topics/world-war2/navajo-code-talkers/ : accessed April 21, 2021)