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Madam C.J. Walker

Madam C.J. Walker

Madam C.J. Walker (December 23, 1867 – May 25, 1919) was a businesswoman and philanthropist who was also the first African American female self-made millionaire. Early Life Born Sarah Breedlove in 1867 on a cotton plantation near Delta, Louisiana, Walker was the daughter of formerly enslaved parents. Orphaned at just 7 years old, she married …Read More

Men of the 1st Battalion, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, during liberation of Rome, June 8, 1944

Liberation of Rome

On June 4, 1944, the Allies liberated Rome, Italy, from the Germans, making it the first of the Axis capitals to fall during World War II. Background Following a successful invasion of Sicily, the Allies moved on mainland Italy in September 1943, with landings on both the east and west coasts of the country. As …Read More

"The Death of General Warren at the Battle of Bunker's Hill, June 17,1775," by John Trumbull

Battle of Bunker Hill

The Battle of Bunker Hill, which took place on June 17, 1775, was the first major battle of the American Revolutionary War. The main commanders were Major General William Howe on the British side, and Colonel William Prescott on the Americans’. The British were under siege in Boston, Massachusetts, so they planned to take the …Read More

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Battle of Gettysburg

Battle of Gettysburg

The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863) was the bloodiest battle of the Civil War. It took place around Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and is often considered the turning point of the war. Following a series of military successes in Virginia, Confederate general Robert E. Lee took his troops up into south-central Pennsylvania in June 1863 in an invasion of …Read More

Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol

Prohibition

The Prohibition Era was a period between 1920 and 1933 when the 18th Amendment to the Constitution was in effect. This amendment prohibited the manufacture, sale, and transport of alcohol in the United States. For decades leading up to the passage of the 18th Amendment, reform groups within the temperance movement had worked to eliminate …Read More

Signing of the armistice with Germany

End of World War I

On November 11, 1918, German representatives met with Ferdinand Foch, the commander in chief of the Allied armies, in a railroad car northeast of Paris, France, to sign an armistice to end the fighting of World War I. Countries allied with Germany—Bulgaria, the Ottoman Empire, and Austria—had already signed armistices with the Allied Powers between the end of …Read More

Ted Kennedy in 1962

Chappaquiddick Incident

On July 18, 1969, Senator Edward “Ted” Kennedy accidentally drove a car off a bridge on Chappaquiddick Island, Massachusetts; he survived, but his passenger, 28-year-old Mary Jo Kopechne, died in the accident. On the night of the incident, Kennedy and Kopechne left a party on Chappaquiddick Island together after 11 p.m. in a car driven …Read More

Pearl Harbor Bombing

Attack on Pearl Harbor

The attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Territory, on the morning of December 7, 1941. Wikipedia Learn more about the through historical newspapers from our archives. Explore newspaper articles, headlines, images, and other primary sources …Read More

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