March 14, 1924

Powered by Ancestry AI This feature is powered by an AI language model using public information. Quality and accuracy may vary. The views and opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of Newspapers.com™ or Ancestry®.

News from March 14, 1924

News from March 14, 1924 (Buffalo Courier, via Newspapers.com™)

Molasses Burglar at Large in Buffalo

On March 14th, 1924, newspapers reported that in the early spring of 1924, the city of Buffalo, New York was the setting for a series of peculiar and unsettling break-ins. The wrongdoer came to be known as the “Molasses Burglar” due to the pattern of targeting homes in affluent areas and then moving on to local businesses.

One of the burglaries took place at a grocery store owned by D. L. Maulbetsch, located at No. 77 Hertel Avenue. The store suffered the loss of $30 from the cash register, as reported by the Buffalo Courier. The method of entry matched the mode used in previous burglaries linked to the Molasses Burglar.

At the Eastern States Battery Company store on 882 Michigan Avenue, intruders forced their way through the front door but seemed to have been startled, perhaps by passing pedestrians, which led them to abandon two radio sets in an alley nearby while making their escape.

A different incident was reported at the tailor shop of Stanislaus Niespodzany at No. 715 Sycamore Street. The front door was forced, and the thieves managed to steal thirty yards of cloth.

An attempted burglary was also noted at the meat market of George Studer at No. 352 Tacoma Avenue, where a burglar alarm scared the would-be burglars away before they could get inside.

Learn more about March 14, 1924 through historical newspapers from our archives. Explore newspaper articles, headlines, images, and other primary sources below.


Source Articles and Clippings

"March 14, 1924," Newspapers.com Topics (https://www.newspapers.com/topics/century-ago-today/march-1924/march-14-1924/ : accessed May 25, 2024)
Topics A Century Ago Today, March 1924 ,

The views and opinions expressed in these newspaper articles and clippings are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Newspapers.com or Ancestry.