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PUBLISHED DAILY SUNDAY AND WEEKLY. -I ARK IIOWEI.I. Editor W. A. I1EMI'IIU.L Uu.ln Manager TrUUorDlog Constitution with Kundiy . Morning Constitution wlbmit Sunday l ou We do not undertake to return r Jcctrd M kill not 8 ouip iile.lt.y teturn poi- Where t hind The Constitution. fl Conttltuttt-i c n be found on sale n the follow hg plAce WAM11XOTON Mctrrp. llun TTotel. JACKSONVILLE-Stockton W. R y Strfti H. H KW i Uro CINCINNATI J. IV. Howler IK Vine stiwl NEW YOUK-Kreatano's. e .ra.-r lir. aiwir a 1 Sli t nth Str rl th 1 MtirRonmjh. 4' I' O. X.w-s Cocinuny. 91 A.iam Street Urral XxrCwrn llutoL V ORLEANS ? \Vbarton. DENVER fOL. Hamilton A KrnJrlck. HOfSTON.TKX.-llottJ.r Br.rf. KANSAS CITY I"-\'un Noy liro MACON. GA. l e artment. \V. D BanHton ILiuaivr. 557 x t. rtone 3i HOME. tA- J. Sim Veal. 5. BroiJ Mrf -t. To Subscriber The Tr\Tf'.lng AKVHM of Tim Onst'.tut'.on an Mti-srt. W. II. overliy and ili.irlf II. iMnne IT. NICHOLAS IK'Ll.1PAY Conitltnllou BulMlna olt Advertising lUnugiTS for all territory ouukleof Atlanta. ATLANTA GA. July 23 1S97. NOTICE. G. \V. TasE r is no lonsvr conn'Vtctl with The Constitution ar.d his no authority to collect subscriptions. CONSTITUTION' PrrtMSHINCr CO. The Williams Lynching. The lyuctiiag of Oscar Williams- news of which shocked the people of the eut yesterday Is to be'Ueplored. With commendable promptness. Judge Beck had called a special term or We court to convene in Henry county next Monday for the trial of Williams and in. all probability the negro would have been found guilty and sentenced In. less bah one month from the day he .committed his heinous crime. The. lynching was thoroughly and completely inexcusable. The time for sudden passion which might have been offered in extenuation of appeal to mob law on the arrest of the negro had passed by and the prompt ness with -which the presiding judge of the circuit had moved made the lynching unjustifiable from any point of view. There will of course be those who will use this lamentable Incident as an argument that the hurrying up of trials will not stop appeals to mob law. Such a conclusion Is not justified as the in cident proves the contrary view. The de lay and the postponement of trials by resorts to various appeals and by taking advantage of the intricacies of the criminal laws has been so Impressed upon the people that they have lost faith in promises and the result Is that Jn swinging backward the pendulum of public sentiment has gone to an unusual extreme. The people have seen murderer after murderer self-confessed slip through the hands of the law until they have been educated to look upon that result as the usual outcome of murder trials. They stand aghast at the opportunity offered by the law for new trials and for final escape by the process of appeals to'the state and to the United .States courts and to the interminable plea of insanity with all Its tortuous- ness. The lynching of "Williams was a 1 laal act which Is most profoundly con- j demned by The Constitution. But denunciation of the mob is no remedy for the evils under which we labor. What we have to do Is with the future. Let j the people be assured that In the fu ture trials will be held sacred and that our courts are tribunals before which lawyer and juror are equally responsible to the Judge all cases to be Invest- j rated In good faith with the purpose of reaching an honest verdict of guilty or innocent the verdict to be respected and ENTORCED. The people of Georgia are not only law-abiding but they are conservative to slowness. New-fashioned Ideas unless of a' very practical character find no lodgment in their minds. They know -what a plain fact Is and they do not understand nor approve the technicality which would envelop it In mystery end make It unrecognizable. Give them plain law plain trials and plain justice and there will be no more outrages up on the law committed In this state. Sentiment or Science Sensational fads are constantly spring- tag up In New York. The latest develop ment in this line takes the form of a social organization designed to promote scientific marriage. and la at present the talk of the metropolis. The members of this unique society hold that sentiment should be eliminated from the marriage contract and that In Its place scientific considerations should be substituted. They reason that sentiment is In the highest degree prejudicial to a wise choice of life part ners and that individuals contemplating marriage should first pass a scientific examination for the purpose of as certaining their mental moral and physical conditions. These matrimonial scientists Insist further that no couple with a yearly income of less than 1,000 should be permitted to have moVe than two children. "Whether the members of this new set- en order Intend to exemplify the principles which they lay down or whether they merely seek to beguile the tedium of these dull summer months by -getting up some original sensation does not appear from the meager accounts which have come to hand. But this U Immaterial. Whatever the underlying purpose of the movement may be. It la altogether too ludicrous to Invite serious comment. That sentiment often clouds tie judgment and brings about 111-as- a better means of choice. There is some reason in the plea that sentiment should be regulated by scientific prin ciplea but science can never wholly supersede the divine law of love which has presided over the marriage altar for the past 6,000 years. What God has established man cannot abrogate. Sci ence may render noble service as love's helpmeet but-it can never become love's substitute. Probably Intentionally Misunderstood. The Savannah Press which seems to lean against the democratic organiza tion whenver it gets a chance asks this question IV we understand the unsophisticated Bob Uafloy to arpuo that the democratic Joctrmo of tariff reform is a dead issue Mr. Bailey stands upon the democratic platform for which 6.500,000 demo crats voted and which is in line with that of 1846 and those following it save the one convention controlled by the practical sentiment of protected New England which wanted Its manufactured goods cared for by protection at the sac- riiUe of southern raw materials. The democrats voted for tariff reform in li 92 only to be cheated on this is out as they hul'been on the financial question by a lot of political bunko eteerera. They had forced upon them a measure whose ad valorem duties averaged 40 per cent which took away the protection for the Georgia wool grower as a present to thfe Massachu setts manufacturer and then gave the manufacturer a protection of 50 per cent out of the pocket of the wool grower who had been ruthlessly robbed. 'Babe. Bailey" and the democratic party are for that tariff reform which will impose equal burdens and benefits upon all and not one which robs the produc er in the interest of the manufacturer. As Serm Through Negro Eyes. One of the recent visitors to the Nashville exposition was a colored man of education and talent by the name of John E. Bruce of Albany N. Y. Since returning home tlfls observant colored visitor has published a letter in which he gives out some wholesome Informa tion concerning the treatment of tie- groes in the south. The writer declares without mincing words that the people of the south entertain little or no prejudice toward the negro and that whatever friction oc curs between the two races in this section is largely caused by the negroes themselves. This statement coming voluntarily from one of the leading ex ponents of the negro race cannot-fall to satisfy even the most rabid of our nordierji criftcs. Says the negro vis itor to \ho Xashville exposition ikng of raoo discriminations of \vhVh so mui-h has bfen heard recently In the rr. &s and out of It. I am frank to ay tiiK. so fur as my observations went 'ht-re is no more of it Ui Nashville than liuro is n Washington. Baltimore or Bos ton. It La a littlo more pronounced to be sure in Nashville than In the other1 places d. ii there are good and sub- ii.uuUl reasons for its exisence. chief iimon which Is th fact that some of the l.iw.-r class of blacks are bumptious overly jring and greasy In public places and on public rirriiTs They are bolste.nws nd s'omttim ra insulting. and are always looking for trouble. They realize that rh y ore free citizens but forget to com- p.irt thfnv with the decency and de corum which become all citizens. I did a c ol deal of street car riding when in Xa-hvillo a my KxJsinga w ro quite three mU-H from thrt exposition. In going to and front the grounds I saw things which did not ilpeth--r pl..as. mo Halt-grown ne gro boys would stop the crowded oars sian.l on tha platform smoking vile pipes or cigarettes their coats off and under their arms. their cloUiing'fllttiy and dirty aid tholr Ipnguasd r.vrresponilinsly dirty. When they S".u4 finished their smoka they w.-uM make a br.-ak for the first vacant seats In the car. If there was a pace be- twvn two well-dressed colored passengers they would plump themselves Into it with all their dirt and disgusting odors and they would crowd white paj-senger.4 in the fame way. entirely indifferent to the fact that they" were offi-nsivo to sight and smell. Among this class of negroes everywhere there Is a derided absence of respect and pri'le and it is this class that makes Jordan a hard road for the average re spectable negro to travel and whose disgraceful conduct In public plaoes intensities the prejud'ea against the race. Happily there does not exist in the north the same Ignorance and misapprehension on the subject of the negro which formerly existed In that s&ction. Within the past few years much" light has been thrown upon-the solution by candid writers whose only object has been to state the truth and in this connection it Is gratifying to observe that negroes tliemselves have largely contributed to bring about this better un derstanding. The observations of the Albany negro are most respectfully commended to the sober perusal of our friends in the north. As to Free Haw Materials. In his speech already quoted by The Constitution upon the newfangled Idea of free raw materials Mr. Bailey admirably said I will always rejoice to see our manufacturers enlarge the market for their p'Muls but 1 shall always Insist that they must do this under the same rules and lim itations that govern all other tl.ipses In this country. As long as the farmers mechanics and mojchants must pay taxes to -ipiiort thf ppvernmcnt. I shall insist that the manufacturers shall pay their Just proportion. I shall nver consent to encourage any man's business -by remitting his taxes Vxvausa It is the duty of all men to bear their Just share of the burdens of'the gov- r-rnmf-nt. and whenever one class bears less than Its proper share all others classes must l "ar more than theirs.- I am not able to distinguish as a matter of principle be tween the republican proposition to favor the manufacturers by Increasing the taxes of all other classes for th r benefit and this other proposition to favor th m by remitting their taxes. The object of each Is to increase the profits of the manufacturer and one accomplishes it by allowing an advantage In the sale of goods while the other accomplishes it by allowing an advantage In tin purchase of materials but each la equally a special privilege and parti must always be aaually objectionable to men who believe In the sacred principle of equal rights to all and special privileges to none. I am opposed to republican pro- toetlon because It discriminates between American citizens giving to the one who sells an unjust advantage over the one who buys and I am op-posed to this modern theory of free raw materials because It discriminates between American citizens giving to tile one who buys an unjust advantage over the one who sells. That this free raw material doctrine was but a scheme by which the protect ed interests sought to commit the de mocracy to advocacy of a protective tariff. Is certain. In view of the history 'which has been brought to light. Who wanted this 'raw material The protected Interests. \VJiy did they.vapt it As a club with which to -beat shown the price's of fit out of this smashing orprices products In the cheapening of the prices of the manufactures therefrom Not one cent "for these free raw material howlers have kept a heavy protective tariff of 40 to BO per cent upon every article manufactured. Who then got the benefit of the. trade The protected manufacturers. What did the people get The. goose That is the whole story and it is well that it has been told. The principle of protection sugar coat it by what name you will label It Wilson or Mc- Klnley as Interest dictates. Is the same abomination a stench in the nostrils of the people and must be replaced by the true democratic doctrine of equal taxation and responsibility every man whether manufacturer or operative do- lug his equal share according to his possessions for the support of the government So special privileges No exemptions Perfect equality for every man That is democracy In a nutshell. Nature Favors Bimetallism. The director of the geological survey la authority for the following table showing the yearly.output of gold in the United States since 1887 17 .J33.000.000 1892 J33.0M.OOO 1555 33.175.000 1153 35.950.000 1S 9 32.5511,744 15,54 39.500.000 tow U atoll 4fi.C10.WK 1391 -a.17J.OUO 1596 51.500.000 From the above figures It appears that the gold output of the United States .has been steadily increasing for the past few years. In discusing 'these figures The Cleveland Plain Dealer one of the stoutest advocates of free coinage in the country although published in Mark Hanna's home town argues that provi dence Is clearly opening up the way .to universal bimetallism. Says the. Cleve land paper further What becomes of the oft-repeated argu ment of the overproduction of silver It Is very probable that the production of gold for the next ten years will be $301110000 per ye 'greater than the production of sliver and perhaps fifty millions. This may be the btst argument possible for the free coinage of silver slay it not be that the sound money saints will want to put silver as the standard If It becomes dearer than gold In connection with the figures cited by the director of the geological survey the recent gold discoveries in Alaska should be taken into consideration. If gold and silver do not already exist fn the ratio of 16 to 1 Tt.is evident that nature Is unlocking her storehouses in order to leave no doubt as to tjie exactitude of this time-honored parity. The Courier-Journal's senator Dehoe was selected as a 'McKinley protectionist and votes as such. It would be a fearful thing if the uncle of an aunt of a cousin of a brother-in- law of a mother-in-law of somebody's guardian should get into a jury box. There would have to be either- a change of venue or a continuance or an appeal to the supreme court. President McKinley sometimes thinks he will and then he thinks he won't Tie Turks will retreat from Thessaly hut their murders of Christians wjll not be abated as their maintenance Is neces sary to the validity of some of lloths- chlld's bonds. It Is time for ex-Senator "Palmer to undergo another change of. politics. He sheds more frequently as he grows older. It Is a singular feature of the disease that a man's Insanity cannot be discovered until after he -has murdered somebody. Hiss Stolen Gladstone -will undertake the opening ceremony in cor.noction with the Hot l for Women Students which has been erc-ctcd at or near Belfast. Ireland. Queen Victoria during the Jubilee made an exception regarding the acceptance of g'fts from private persons. Mr. VHllers. the -doytn" of the house of commons now In hs ninety-sixth year received per mission to send a gift 10 her majesty. It -was a beautiful parasoLv The salaries of the professors of Glas- cow university last year anv unied to 23.733 the best paid of them being Pro.- fessor Cloland who received 1.645. .while the smallest -emoluments were those of Profesecra Simpson Stair and Becker each of whom received 600. The late Archbishop Jenssens of New- Orleans left an estate of only about tii.OOO.- which ho inherited from his father and three-fourths of it he bequeathed for re ligious and charitable purposes. Ho was entitled to a handsome salary for years but drew barely enough to pay the actual expensesfor his simple living havlag al lowed the remainder to accumulate to pay off the debt of the diocese. John I. Blair of Blalrstown. N. J. now In his ninety-fifth year and worth J40- 000.000. made by bull "ling railroads and speculation in their watered stock laughed hemily the other day when he heard- the report that he was dying. "I feel stronger and better now than I have for some months ago he said. "I have been ill. but um getting stronger and stouter HDW. You see. I can scarce span my wrist. A couple of months ago my angers lapped over. I am picking up and hope to live many years yet. 11. Fremlet ttie sculptor who has been commissioned to execute the statue of II. Ferdinand de Lessups to be erected at the entrance to the Suez canal says the monument will be of colossal propor tions four times life size. M. de JLes&tpa will be represented standing with the plans of .the canal in- one hand and the other hand pointing toward the entrance. Upon the granite pedestal will be medallions representing in bas-relief the portraits of the three khedlves who encouraged the con- Biruction of the canaL A Youtliful Father and Mother. From The Balnbrldge Ga. Light. Other counties may boast of their twins and triplets but when it comes to a case of youthful parents this county now steps to the front. Several days since Mrs. Mar- cellua Ernest who lives near Cyrene gave birth to a nine-pound daughter and mother and child are both doing well. Mr. Ernest the father is only sixteen and his wife is only thirteen years of age. Mr. -Ernest paid us a call a few days since hence we are certain of the facts In the case. We feel assured that so long as she has such patriotic sons and daughters within her borders the grand old county of Decatur need never'fear any serious diminution In her population. Serves All Alike. From The Birmingham-News. It would seem that Judge Lynch does not draw the color line in Georgia. What de use cc slghln' Kate It cloudy overhead Slqr Is des a Kase de sun Is gene ter bed I Can't be always sunny- Hush my in onet Go ter sleep my honey. En you'll wake up In de suns Go ter sleep Go ter sleep Par's gold In de rainbow eh you gwtae ter Irtt a heap Ain't- It time fer bringin' Er de dark along Ain't de rain a Of a by-bye soig Close yo' eyes my honey- Hush my 11T one Can't be always stinny But you'll wake up in de sun Go tic sleep- Go ter sleep Car's fold In de rainbow en you gwlne tee git a heap Five men formed themselves Into a lynching party and strung up a negro who had stolen a horse. In their haste they failed to tie his hands awl heAiIng 11 poise as of a party approaching they decamped and left the negro swinging. That swinging motion bro Mm In dose proximity to the tree which he en circled with his arms climbed to the limb front which he was suspended cut himself down arid went home to supper. He subsequently said to'h.U wifc "Mandy \vhlla I wuz a dar I 'saw heaven wide open wld Closes en' de prophets en' de res' er dm en now I'm gwlne off eh quit stealln en preach de gospel A Georgia farmer employed the poet of the village to write some obituary verso on tho death of his brother. He gave tho poet all the points at'his. com nand. and the latter began as follows 'lie d this life of pain an' strife Paid all that he did owe. An' said one day 'I jet can't stay I reckon I must go. That's est what he did say commented the farmer "go on. "Upon the skies he sot his eyes The Christian brave an' bold An' then he took' the heavenly prize A crown an' harp of gold. "Stop right thar. John exclaimed the old man "stop right thar an' change that. He wuz fer silver tot the last Already they are addressing Editor Mc Intosh as "governor. But to all such he replies almost hi the language of Shake speare and with commendable modesty "Why do you dress n e In borrowed robes The governor of Georgia lives u prosper ous gentleman And to be governor. Stands not within the prospect of belief No more than to be president But for all that south Georgia Is shouting "Hooray for Governor Mack Unsettled Problems. De be work all do' summer long Ter keep hlsstlf alive De ircn he say "bat come my way I gwlne Ur rob tta ilvet" O .believers. Don't you do. dat way Bar's lots cr things ter settle up When coma de Jedgment day De doosfer" say 'Til crow fer day" He tell his fambly all De nigger nab him on de way En he don't crow at all O "believers. Don't you do dat way Dar's lots er things ter settle up When come do Jedpment day A gallant Tennessee editor says he "likes to haul wheat to the/thresher when every other load Is a load of girls. That editor has doubtless been reading Richard de GaUlenne. who sings In- this wise \Vrom wheat field to wheat field Youth passes along. With a cart load of girls And a heart load of song. Master J. B. Latlmer the youngest edi tor In Georgia Is in Atlanta. Ho Is one of the assistant editors of The Lumpkin Independent and though only thirteen years of age has been known to tackle the tariff in a two-column editorial many a time and oft. He said yesterday "I'm for free silver free passes and full collections at a dollar a year. Invariably in advance. Got the Wrong Leg. A Georgia drummer had a customer whose name was Legs. The latter failed In business and the drummer who happen ed to be on hand at the time telegraphed his firm "Legg has broke The firm placed the wrong construction on the telegram and replied "Sorry. See a physician and keep ober. Stoke Susong is the name of an east Tennessee citizen who is coming Into prom inence. We suggest that Stoke Susong. Link Houk Kl Gudger Bart Baddies and Mart Mush appoint a day and have a family reunion. v Advertisers are wide awake these days. At the foot of a column story of the death of a man by drowning the following advice appeared "For that sinking sensation take brown's Pills. The tariff looks upon the tobacco trust as a light affair and the lead trust is now a dead weight to the country. The Race for Governor. In 'the coining humming campaign There'll be lots and cords 0' fun If-the candidates for governor. Have room enough to run Some may" be laid upon the shelf. And fall to run no more But if each man votes for himself There'll be a deadlock sure The president .has not looked with much favor on the south. He even gave that big prize watermelon the cut direct. Peary may be all right but Balloonmas- ter Andree certainly has higher claims to our consideration. Ten Eyck won the diamond sculls but you can't beat his superiority Into some of those thick British skulls. F. 1 a The Waterbury Spring. From The ABhevllle Gazette. While Charles McNabb was monkeying with the mechanism .of a music box the old Waferbury spring broke and sent three large screws boring through space one of which passed tfirough the. fleshy part of McNabb's hand.'while another skimmed a bystander passing through the brim of his bat. From The Savannah Ga. .News. It sometimes occur that a lynching can be explained in such manner as to- car ry the responsibility for the occurrence beyond but not excusing the lyncbers themselves. The Ryder lynching may be 'Considered a case in point. In a measure the responsibility goes back to"the practice of the courts. Dr. Ryder commuted cold-blooded murder upon the person of an estimable young lady whose only offense was that she was lovable and lovely. It seems that Dr. .Ryder was infatuated with her. Be- ca-use she did not reciprocate 'his send- meats he blew her brains out In the parlor of a friend's house while she all unsuspecting was engaged In pleasant conversation with a visitor. The affair' was so open that there was never for a moment a suggestion of doubt as to Dr. Ryder's guilt. He was brought to trial and after a hard-fought legal battle was con- vteted and sentenced to be hanged. Then began the usual contest for saving the life of the condemned through techuica.il- ties. The case was taken to the supreme court and a new trial secured. A called term of the lower court was convened for the purpose of hearing the case. There were presented certain reasons why the trial should go over until another term of the court and a continuance was granted. The delay of Justice and the probable final escape of the accused through a loophole of the law exasperated the people to an-extraordinary degree and they took the law into their own hands. It thus appears that the lynching of-Dr. Ryder was not brought about by rriometv- tary excitement. His crime was committed more than fifteen months ago. There was a long and patient wait upon the machinery of the law. The people were willing that the law should take its course. Finally however they "became impatient ar.d desperate. They noted the law's delays and the gradual eradication by time of the evidence against the accused. It Is a well known fact that the longer .the time between the crime and the trial the harder it is to secure a conviction. We do not suggest that there was anything of the kind In this case but in some cases lawyers purposely delay trials in order that witnesses may die or move out of the reach of the courts. While we have not a word to say in mitigation of the crime of the lynchers of Ryder we-feel-Justified in saying that one of the principal causes of the lynching was the shaking of confidence in the ability of the courts to mete out prompt and proper punishment for crimes "of vlclence. And the incident of the lynching we think is a powerful argument In support of our contention and the opinion of the Georgia Bar Association that there needs to be a revision of the rules of practice in the courts by which there may be more speedy trials with greater prospects of convictions and "the carrying out of the Judgment of the courts. From The Thomasville Ga. Times. The outraged friends of the murdered girl tired of the law's delay and disgusted with the slow course of Justice in so plain a case of murder seized Ryder and hanged him to a limb. No wonder there are lynch- ins when confessed murderers can cheat the gallows far years by mere technicalities. From The \Vaycross Ga. Herald. It seems that Judge Lynch is determined to teach the other judges a lesson in promptness. From The Gr.lffln Ga News. The press very generally expresses the opinion that the lynching of Ryder was Justifiable if not altogether proper and good form From The Macon Ga. News. It Is generally admitted we think even by those who do not approve of the lynch mg. that the execution of Dr. Ryder by a Talbot county mob more strongly empha sizes the need for some sort of reform in our criminal practice than ay lynching that has occurred In this state. It cannot be charged that the lynching was duo to the Inflamed condition of the public mind because there was no excitement of any kind attending it. On the contrary it was entirely- deliberate and publlo eentimmt in the community In which it occurred Justifies the act. It differs also from other affairs of this nature In that the people gave the court every opportunity to punish the criminal or at least to dispose of the case in a regular manner. The people had been intensely conservative in dealing with Dr. Ryder. They attempted no violence when it was seen that the courts had undertaken to dispose of the case. They wolte4 patiently for nearly a year and a half and only rebelled when upon another con tinuance of the case- being granted they began to suspect that Justice was being .trifled with For these reasons the lynching can be attributed to no other cause than the law's delay. It emphasizes as we have said the need for some sort of reform. We entertain no prejudices whatever against lawyers as a class and we admire the lawyer who stands by his client to the last ditch but we are forced to suspect that the trouble after all. lies with the lawyers themselves. In the first place as has heretofore been pointed out they are more largely responsible for the laws we have than are any other class of citizens. They usually dominate our state legislature and certainly they either suggest or shape every law affecting criminal and civil practice for they form the Judiciary committee which must pass upon bills of this nature. Therefore. If there are defects In the law they are in a b tter position to know of them and to correct them. Again hey constitute our superior and supreme benches and it Is the latter body .t last that must interpret the law. Arid it is this body that is mainly responsible for the defeat of law and Justice by technicalities which have no substantial bearing on the guilt or Innocence of the pris oners. Instead of striving to see that Justice is done and that a case is tried on its merits the supreme court almost In variably accepts one single error wheth er It affects the guilt or Innocence of the defendant or npt. as sufficient grounds for a new trial. From The Augusta Ga Tribune. He must be poor and friendless Indeed who. convicted of a crime however atrocious has not brougnt Into play for him some of the technicalities -of the law and has an endless succession of stays and new trials. In Dr. Ryder's case no. soon at' was he convicted and sentenced than he was granted .a new trial on the ground that 000 of the Jurors in his case was-a relative to the guardian of his victim. Pretty far fetched excuse that was but th precedent of setting aside the verdict when accurate records were kept would have been deemed sufficient ground to set aside"the" verdict if BO other grour could be found. On thia flimsy pretext the su prams court set aside the Verdict made our courts and the -admlnlstratlon of law ridiculous and granted the convicted man. a new trial. The case was again called last Monday and the prisoner's counsel asked for another continuance upon the ground that one of his lawyers waa sick and unable to attend and the Judge again put off the case.- Think of It four" of his counsel were present and. only one was unable to be there. Yet the Judge ruled that the plea required granting a continuance If that ruling be correct elf that is necessary henceforth 'for a muiv derer to do to avoid coming to trial will be to employ a sufficiently .large number of lawyers to assure of one of them being sick when the case U called m court. Sick ly lawyers and lawyers who ara confirmed invalids to an extent to prevent earning bona fide fees will be In demand and their very disabilities will facilitate their earn ings of large lees in extreme cases. It was very evident In Dr. Ryder's case that as la done with all murderers in Georgia who have money and friends he would never be punished as the law -dl- recta for the crime he had committed. The outraged people look the law Into their own hands and administered justice which the courts refused. They did right There are other casca .now pending In the courts where It appears that if 'Justice Is ever done Judge Lynch will have to ad minister It. From The Albany. Oa. Herald. The lynching of Dr. Ryder in Talbot county Monday evening indicates that there is something wrong In the administration of the criminal laws In this state.- A year ago this man had been convicted of murder and sentenced to hang. The case had gone to the" supreme .court and a. new trial ordered. It had dragged Its weary way along until the people of Tat- bat county had come to the conclusion that Ryder would escape the penalty of his terrible crime. They feared the courts were powerless to do justice in the mat tar and the only way to have Justice done In the case was to take it in their own bands. As much as the fact Is to be deplored their argument n view of the criminal annals of Georgia seems unanswerable. For tl e good name of the state for Its peace and the safety of its'citizens some remedy for this evil should be found. There must be a way to force criminals to a speedy trial and some point at which trials shall end. Otherwise this spirit of anarchy will grow until it will be a positive menace to society. From The Calhoun Ga. Times The citizens" seemed to fear that he would never be punished if left to the courts. This is one of the. great breeders of lynch law. If the courts had acted. promptly and If Ryder had received his deserts a year ago the state would have been spared the disgrace of another lynching. Where the Blame Lies. From The Florida Times-Union. \VecaU attention .especially to the. Ryder lynching because it Illustrates very strikingly the. evil consequences that.- ow from a faulty administration of the criminal laws. The crime commit by Dr. Ryder WE a One to. try the patience of tBe most conservative law-loving .community but there was no interference with the regular recesses of the courts. No civilized patriotic man ought to de fend or advocate mob pile. He must see that In the long run It'will destroy civill- zatlou and ruin our country. But when the individual gives up his right of private vengeance for wrong done him and the mob resigns the right to rule which Its strength gives it they do so on the under standing that the .state acting through its officials will right wrongs and punish crimes more wisely and certalnly than they can do. "When the. state utterly fails to perform its contract when it is shown that Its courts are not certain to punish even -the most dastardly and inexcusable of mur darers even after months or years'of delay what are they to do Is it not inevitable that they will be strongly tempted In take back the powers they surrendered to the state and- which are by It unused or misused Tlier Assistant "Republicans. From The DaWson. Ga. News. The Kentucky goldbuga held a convention last week and nominated an assistant republican candidate for the office now vacant in that state. The high cockalorums of the convention as Is always the ease "when there is a gathering of the bobtails were a number of "exes. such as ex-Secretary Carlisle ex-Congressman Breckenridge ex- Candidate Buckner and others who have been kicked out of office for trying to betray the democratic party into the hands of republicanism. From The Louisville Times. Miss Lulu McGuIre says the story that she was "married to Mr. John D. Fergus son by Esquire Keigwln on the night of July 4th. sitting hi' a buggy on the bridge over Silver creek near Jefferson is absolutely untrue. The 'squire says the buggy was near the bridge but "not on It. Of course they were married but It is al- ways best to be particular'about these small points. i r. f' Advice to Virginia. From The Rome Ga Advertiser. -It Is rumored that "Old Virginia" is going to offer Grover the presidency of the State university. Vlrjrlhials.the mother of presidents "but she has never given the country a traitor neither care she afford to act foster mother' to. one Ix t Mr. Cleverland live on the vast fortune he "made" while duck shooting A Word for Candler. From The Dawson Ga. News Hon. Allen D Candler. the present secretary of state is receiving much favorable mention a a 'prospective .candidate for governor. It Is the opinion of this paper that the able- and. honest Pigeon Roost citizen would make the democrats an Ideal candidate for chief .execu'Uve. Toughened by-Experience. From The Birmingham News. A South Carolina editor who was strucfc by lightning escaped with nothing worse than a Bevere shaking up. A thunderbolt needn't be expected to kill a man Who had withstood the attacks of dispensary whisky Infallible Signs From The Daytona Fla Commonwealth. If any one spelaks of the commonwealth of God the brotherhood of man the federa tion of the world. he ought to be Bhutup- in the lunatic asylum as a crank. lines o'Ki'Qudger. From The Asheyille GaWte.- Grandmammy. grandrpammy look at iii' He goes to Panama instead of ShanghaC-- Bay what yon please. jps.aH the'same to K g anything Just so it's pie crime It reflection checked we lapse Trial by person blood and rants the of .every fast lentless tofore tyrants. Every cowardly society punish it encourage fesslon Snail we law-abiding of If the life taken are errors correct and liberty Tha few by the for any ford e speedy satisfy devised would First presiding TKslled law ought continuance of of the counsel should order pear to capable ant. Second not. as they" ta "do charge to kill them to be thing strength if they 'upon jury or to build respect we must Editor as a some of lice by the Ing that the robs. would tal persons .always and child doubtless cate the of which eace It Is away people tier the take. very captured nothing InJthe hanging tfon. may made life the a house caught likely house tell no I am Ingour not be" to a dignity placed book one criminals. My should andrdb them Editor has tlmony state this United- nal the nesses In a the testJjnony 4ng feldanU i the- pass-a has Editor of Dr. painful tpoi country I say only In Us Among' clety E itiment ly and sentiment less we est terminal instead ed unal pie no of anything- the goat la an worst lay conv whate tempt While cedure .recently opliilon a prlved meats taking' sp -as be Jaw duct of of ay plsm supposed roach rapidlr 'I.'RI F.Uor IE'IPIILL .Ouln. lan .e O o O n. NorDlng wih "ods 7K. t Ol 'b. Moing CODlilulon wlthoul"uu'1. .f. 0 n. Whkl (10111 1"0. "H. .fl'l l und.rtk. rllm .j..lrd an .m"OI do s unl'.8 a.0Upanl.t tr t.tur pOt. rrr I. Cu lllullou. 'i Th. CtUlkn I "I a plC W 1 J OT tflrp.I"n 'LE R"y t1 I't.w. Uto -J. Itley. lo \n' IL F\ YlHK-Hr.ntal Brw" a" Is fl" Ih. 1.ld JICAt l. 1 l'orp. .dam. 1. .r lut.L V RLA -.or DES\ER oL UawltuD.1 lindrlck. HOtSTO TEX.- Hol" Hr KAS"A' Ir. "eparlmell. bar i7 "cunc :1. 11'ne 3 R E. l\-J. aJ I..t. ub.rribft. Ing Aio f 'ntuton ar .1. audt hMI. l"nno'I IClILA H 'Lt 1.- Y. Cl'nllnton .ldln It Ad..rlilns lndgn. OUI"IJe of Atant ATL-\ :3. IS Ta Kr I n. J"n 'r conn'ctl wit on"tltu iin an. 10 authoriy coU"t L-QJl'TIS n'nLSIIG Co Wiims Lyhing. lynclug O\a Wilams- whlh ho\ked 6tt is be lIlun' \\lh trom pL'e.s Jud e Uelk cale pecaltem lour Io cnveuo Henn ounty Ivl- o .llan IP al prbabiiy wOll bttn foud gity geIenl'eJ than Int th h0.I'ommlttel hi 'he InoWng t roughly cQpletely inexlUable. tme wh \h migh bn t appal aredt he nego te c rcu unjustfable 0int \iew. wl b thre w incdent huryin tials w1 Sh cn usion .i8 justfe in. cdent an tJe pstponement sort8 vrious appals. b advantae intrie cles l Impreo upn ta tat that4 1fQdulum publc sentmeut ha pepla hav. sn. afer sei-confcse trouh had ur.ti ben edu ated. upn reul a outome Tey ahat tunty orered te fnal esape press ap as 'o-thestate th. lnlte Stte urt isaiy. al tortuou- lynehng 'Wiiams inl at wh h -most Constituion. d. nuncaton 'evls whih we labr. J.t pepe b aAred te fu- trals mi b sarr curts trbunals jurr equaly al invest- gte. god innoent .erdlt respete. and-E "ORCD. Gergia law conservatve slownes. .ew-tanloned Id.as \1- Yer prctial fud logmnt in. th ir is. nt tehnl- i unro lzaLI tra s justce. wl b cmmited Stmet Scienc Snatonal cnstanty sprng- drlop- lne tOm socal organizaton desige scientfc mar.iage. tlk metrpls. 5oty' tat elmina- ontra It sdntfc substut'd. tat sentlmlnt 1 highet prejudical choie 1e ner. eontemplt- mriage rstpasi tf examnaton t. plrpse as- cerining t i l cnditon. et entsts inist wih I thaI permite m re chldren. Weter membT se- exemplfy priniple tb y mrely Legle tht tlu thele dul sumer getn sens ton appa acounts cre had. I immaterial 8tgether to 'cmet That sentment oten' e Judgent an bring I-a- mens choIc. reasn II sentment b regulatt sclentlprln- cples. scence wholY ha pf"Jdet marriae alt or Go ha stablshed. c nno abrogte. enct ma a hehmet. but. it ca substiut f Intentonaly MlsudeIt d. llanalalnst tle demratc whlnver tis P un.Jprstant lnsophst ated Hab 1 n. tl ar o d.moraUc o..trino lart a isueT Baiey upn dtmoat- I whih cats whch lSit. a folwing i tht conveton cntrole prctkal prtett ew wlhh wante it'manutature pruterton dlmort yott tarir 1S2. cheate is- Ue. had. btn fnancia qutton lot pltlal ttNNS. torce. thEm I Nage pr tok thE protNtlon Gergia prestnt tl I sachu- St.tt manufatuer. ad. manufaeurer protetIon th poet ben roube. BaLEY" demoratc tarit rEorm whc wi benefts upn aliand te manfaturer. n Though Neo reent vlt Expostion colort tducation Brle. N returIng colore \Isitor leter w lc ht sme wholtsome detlars wihout mincng pple thE tltain ltle pn 'e nEgro fricton o- bEtween tht se- caustd the negroi thEmsEly" cing e- the n .gro rct. cannot. fa satlsy norier a's Xash\ie expsiion SIPlkn roo dscmlnatonsof w 'h ml'h ha bten hEant rl tnly Ir. \.J "ut tay tl ,0 Cr obs Vf.tion wEnt O1'r" Id' nwn' it i NashvUI. th r. i In BI\more I duro n Xad v\d n othe 1.1'- l..au. thir" g od .tttal It I the ore f dw.r bl.ks art ov\r- laring j. 1 'ublc plac. publ l'arrir bols len' S .nd s'omdlmts In:1ng. alvays Jotking tllzl rh"y trfo llzels to Ih'f .1v btctmo al ctlze s. .1 I g"i t strtd rl.n1 whin -I hv g9 WIt Uito thr. iho "Jpo lton. thn d .th'r m Half-grow no- gr tht crow. th llat rm \10 plp garctts .f undEr thtr dotl1ingrllhY pnguagd dIry. \\l\n 1 tnsheJ' lhe th rr t cant 'aIS th I sllce t t w.o w.l-dr olor paseIger" I it'h al dIr an. sguslng o.ors thtY pasEnger th iame tnln.J nJir r.nt ot..ns\ smdl Am.nS th cai' ntoes e th r. u 'ih. ats.'nce s.l-rtspe In.J Iri.i anJlt cl1 Jor .ln n har tho re- n.gro trv" an ndud Int"nslre9 I pr.juJ c ral. a HappHy. eXst 1 te nego existe setion. Witin th. pat upon .the soluton an id whoe stte on- I grtlyngto obsere t1emseh'es CO- abut beter obs rvatons repetfuly fien s norh. Fe Rw Mat rias. speh. aready Constituton. materias. Baiey wil rejoie s faturl'rs tnlan tl. markt. f r J"l shal "s Insl t lm- Iallon al olhtr d es cOUnlry. an. m rcants pa tnxes 'I\ort g."ernmnt shal manura"lur.'rs shal shal conet bu intss remt hHlE al bar burJ ns crnf'nt. casg bars Is propr sha al mu t bar m tLIrush mater prlnepI. b- republcan 'the al olh'r cl stS bneft Ind prpo IUon thQm r. 1 et J n fra e s accomplsh.s b alowIng a advantae o good whie acomplihes alo'ing tl materils equaly IP lal priviege. tCch aqualy ohJ Uonble bJfve tho sacre princple al spcal prIvieges t OPPOt republca I ton. bCaus I disrlmlnatl' Amtran cllzEns. Itls oppsed moern e b au.e btween cItzens t7e va age te sls. dotine whic prte- de- moracy advoacy prtttvetr- certan o histor ben bouht tMs."rawmteial protece Inteet. W.y theT. wJ.t A whc to'b .wn tf pri esot \1 t ft outo ths 8maingrzicesofb product te cbeapmn of-the pices manutures terefrm TNot C t tee freer w matera kept. hev rotetve tarlt o certupn arice manufature Wo ten gt te beneft te proeted manufaturer. Wat Pple gel gose stf i wel ha ben tod priciple sugrcat i vm Wisn Kiley intert dictate a stenh -otris pepl andmu8 replace demoratc dorne eua taaton ad renslblty htther opertve d Inghls eul arin psessions suppr gv- ernment .o sedal prlvleges :0 exemptons Perttt ualy ever deorcy j nutel Favr Bietalism. dietor otthe geoloic surey .1s te tolowng tble gld Unte Sttes snce .o. JO 1S .0.0 .3.10) 183 3,9500 1S9 3.SM.74 1s.4. 3.5.0 1S 3,15.01 18 4GGIO.01 .181 3.15.0 18 51.5.0 fre appars Unt Stte ha btn steadly inCeasln te p. yers. disuslng tee fgres Clevelad Plan Daler te advoate fre In cunty altbou' publshe Hanu's tow. age tat .early opning universl blmetlsm theCleve- papr furher or aru- ov"rroducton .Uver I pruet n n.xt tEn wi SO.O "ar 'g1' \te prducto slver tUtymllons. argm.nt pssible sUv .ay snud wl slyer a tandar i beomes deer conneton wit fgres cte te dlretor thegeol gical surey discoveres 'In' Alaka consideraton. I eist rato is evident' tat unloking ia rehoue le.ve a t e Iude otthls tmebonort Courier senatr. a proteton- ist. ad a. suc. I fearul i a a someboy's gardian Int bx. woul eiher cange contnuace or' a te cour. w ten won't Turk wi retrt fr 'esaY 1 ChrLtans w1 a teir mlntenae nees "aUdiy o ltlhs- cld's bds. I tme ex tor cange of poUtcs. mor freuety a I singlar 'feture diseae insaly.cnnot dl covtrtd unti afer ha smebody. ERONA ls U len wI underake. op"g cCremony corn ton Hot1 'omen'Studtnts. ll't erctc l.tngcr Belat Victora url.g jubIee. ma e ar tx"lpUon regring Bceptanc g'fs perons. r. V1lers. .dOlt 0" IInet-ilth pr- nd gif 0 majety. I beauttul Th BIDries w \rverslty .yor a UlE l2.73. tlt t Pr- reeiye ol,645. whie smalts wer thos ProesEcr oir Beker rcelnd o6. Icte lef alout It.O whih inhrlte hi a i bqueathed re- lgIous tnd chariablo PUrp05s. enttle to 5Iay toes drw actu hi lving al- lowe acumulate ot diose Blar Dalrstown yer an OO.O bulUlng. rlrods sptculaton wa eril Slock laughe he Irtly heart rH.rt tht Ind btter nw montJsago bn I. ur' gtting Btronger'ad tout.r se. tarce o IgeT 1lppt OV a plck ni lnd .hoj\ lYt 'et. bn commlsslono state 'erdlul L5UPS t erete enrac te wi b t colosa tmes lte ele S&PS wi b 5tanIg th caI th hand pointng toWI entranc. granit petal wi medalons rp- rEsntlng ba-relef te prtrat thre kholvu. encurae 5lructon f Youtu ad Frm B'nbrldge Lght countes to. ca p rent. cunty nor6teps das Ma- celus Enest. lves matler dolnl weI Ernet. i hl wIe i thirte n yers aKe cal slce henc i cas. We' asure s she patritc S01S d daulhters 'wthin her gnd Deatur 'nee never 'fear srus. dlnutin 1 populaton. Sre A Aie 'he Brlngham News. I woul Lych dos n te clor lne 1.ela. T' \.l .d. Wt de' hln. Ksa ov rheadT SI a se I Ene bel b 1'1' terslep. II w ke sui sleep Val gld ranbw pr t b\apl. Ant i tme brn aongT ran a sl n 0 by-bye sor g 'o' Huh. I'I.onl SU 1" you'l wa I sunt t rsleep G. in runbw yu glne gi A Rmark8b Cnv rlon men forme themselve paty neo whC thlr faied hads. oIse'l de lef nego Iton br'g't 1Im proXmlY en- crcle. w.lh.l arS cImb Imb sUipnded. hll- stlf ard wtnt le subsquenty aald to hi Wi 3 whla saw heaYe ves prophet r Im ot. stean' Settng H Rght Gtrgla yUage wrte obit\ deth hi Hr thl al pints at 'his com.Iland. latt I' a folows "le lne sl'le Pid al' rkon go. "That's jet e mente fare on hi eyes Th ChrsUan prze crwn gid" tha excaImed te top tat. .1 siver tct. Alredy tey 'rf.slng I tosh "goveror. al reple5alost I lngage Shake spre wit modesty n'e borrwed Jbes gvvrnol lYta prpr- getlman g ver.or Stds wihIn th Irospet belef morE preient to\ al frgla I -hut- Gvem r Unsetle blems. be al d lummer hlsstt ai ve he e way- cb dab.lvet" Elever dltwyl Das sette u "hn j entday D dooste tel al niger hi ali I el ves. Dn't o Dlr's stUe jegenl galant eior sys "lke hail th'thre.her whn eve loai- grls. edIor ha d0bUess bCn Richar .al ene llngs t. thI whet feJd wh t feld passe Wit a Ad h.ar ioa g. Mater Ltmer. YOlngest Grga Atanta asslstant dtors Independent ad to g thireen ben takle th tart twv-colun eitorial my .tme Ind oft "Im. slh..r. fre pase nd ful dola InvarablJ Gt th Lg. Georga drmmer ha nme Lgg. latte fae drumtr. happn- e 0 tte. telegphe fr "Lgg broke" frm constructon ad repJ "Soy. se aphyslca kep 1- Slong 1 te a est Tennesse citzen wb coing Lnk louk. .udge. Bat Bddie Mat dy famiy AdvertST 'arew''awake' stor ot drowng tolowlng slnlng senston tae tarlt lok trst l lght atalr trst I weiht. t count. Rae' Gveror. he comng hUlng ampaIg There'l b ad fUl I- the 'ca ldate goveror. rom enou run Sme t b tal rn ech ma hmslf. There'l de dfok sue preldnt .s loke wih out. 'hat prze waterl e cu dIret Pear b al rght Baloonmas certal. clams o consderton Eck Udiaond. sculs. ct bt sprorty ito sam Ct tck Brtsh skuUs L s Te Watebu Bprg. Te A8eve Gaete. Whle CakMcNab wasmnkeying wih te. mechaism b Cld Watrbur splD brke .an thre lare strws brng throuh. spe sP ig n O bystander pssi. trouch te br hl Jat Frm Savanat.Q I sometmes ocurs that.a lychIng can b p1e 1 'SU l mnner 'IS .ar- r te rspnibly. iheoccurr-mce beyOd l nchers temaelVe 'he Ryd r tycbll be' 'conidere cae pInt' I. meure pn- slblity goe bak t the 'pr tlce ot court commute cold murer uPn prS a utmwle young oe 'i that w& ad I sms tht w 1ntatute t B cs rprcte 'hI sent- br8I I e pa- hue al susptig 'wa mgagei pleat on- veraton wih a visior. nar' w wa nver r suggeton t ders & wa brught tral ad at r hd togb lega batte. con- de an se.ten b hange. Ten bg Uua savIg. th lfe t conemn.d trogh tecII tE. ca wa ten ad a 5ue. cale I te cour wa conven tl purs heaing .Ce Tere preet ctan reaons th tra shouli unt aoter ter o cour ad cntnuace gt- e.The deay jltce probble fnl ecap te 'acuse a eXIPrte p a'etrlna degree tok Iaw ther ow hs. I thu apPa te of' Dr. Rydtr wa nt brough abut mOI.- t exctement lis comit tha ffen Ther w ad patimt upo chtnY popie wl lw Flnay. bae Impatent desprate. They. note la w's ad gua eracaton tme e"ldence aganst .accused I I wel tht .he tie crie a harer i sure' covicton. sugget ther wa aything .ths cae II caes la"'er purosly 'd fay tras that wltr s reah courts 'Vhle 0 wor sy' I mItgaton crme h6 lyncher we.teljustfe sayin prnclp causs te .lynchng te shak g. condence abiiy th cours prmpt ad prp luImnt crme yldenc An to 1cldent pwerul ament. i sU t cntenton Gerga Aclto tat.thEre nec b a revIgo. te rle 'pmtce cours ther my 'b morspeY tWs wth gter propts convictons a" cal'Ine te jugent \e court Frm Te Tholawle Ga. Tmes. Te oul O trends murdeed girl tred laws dlay a dsguste te' sloW coure Jutce 5 plai caot sizd ad hae 1mb. 10 a inrs. Ces muerers cn chot galow9 .ca me ten1cll- tes Fom Te Wa'crs Ga Herld I seem i determne teach oter juge leso prmptnes. Frm Grifn. Ga ver gnraly. R.de w justfble. i nt atotthcr goo torm G New. I geterly amIted. tho e IPrye Ue Iync- te exeuton Tlbt cunty mb. e pb- sue ne tOr ur cr n prtc ta In OCCUle statt. I cnot cae tbt th lynch lg w te Intamr condIton publc bcaus ther wa ctement kIn ateding it oontrr. .It wa entrey. delberate publo sntlEut i cmmuniy I. i ourre justie act dter as tom eas f nature tat pople oye' opportunty pU h 'he crimIna leat dIsps te C\ i a ma mer. Te peple ha ben tensy caser.atye d lng wtl atempte Ylolene whe wa curts h udetaen dspe cs. Tey wate p tentv nely 3 yor haf. rb le when upn uother tnuarce bing gnted ba suspt that jutc wa bing I. te wit tee ron te ca b atrbute' cuse. laws I emphasIze o th ned' Bore sor. refor. 6 entEtain n whtever agn' lawef a clas adme lawyE' .tad cHent'tq dith ar .or su- pt tt tuble. fer ai le' wit. lawer themal.es. frt plae. l hertore ben plnte ot. th ar mor lagiy reponIbe th we tha ae ay ca cUZe. u ualY ou legislatur an caInly eiter sugget or. shp ever aeth crmin acvU prc- tc the juica com mtee mut pas upn bls natur Therfor I the ar dfect ar ltr plten ad cret tem. Agin they our'supror b b. a te tater by at ia th& mUt ierret A 1 tis 1 'manY rePnlie defat anq j\stc t h- caUewhlb BubtlnUal bar- git OJ Inoece t Prs oner. Instea srIvng t4 s don a. 'hat a trie I. merts. t. 8up'rme cur amot fn- 'arlby acpt C sngie eor I a tl th g1t Inncee. te defeat a 6ufcent gund neW tra Frm Te AugtaGa. ibne Jemust b pr treless -ndeed convicte crme. howec. ar ciau ba nt IO t tenctl Jaw an hi a endles. lucosslo of' atys ta11. D. 'Ryde cae qn- e w cnvte ad sentenee ta wa gt r goun tht te j ,1h C wa. rtve tot gn hyictt Py t tetceexct that 'wu. tb p eetof.e 1 1h j ci -4 .f when. ute r. 1er kept.wou have ben deer sfclent gundto @ aside 'the' verlt ifno oth r gco 1 b tound O thltmsy prete tth8 Sl prrecor s ute ver1c. e ur c urt ad t amnstraton. rdcUou i ad gante cnvctema a le' tra 'eca j aalncle ia tMonaya e prI onel unl akt 'aoter ct1ue up g n on t Iawer w sl k a unae atenda te aan otte 'lnk 1t.toU ctlusel wer preet ad. .one wa ule b ther Ue jug rle te plea reuIr gatig 0 Gntiuace I ril b cn neeS. h nceorh 'f r avo cmIng t 'emp1y audty .age. nu r 1awel P9ure t 00 tem ng. l k c cale't cou laWe ad law w o are C e n-ds. to extet prvet eng 'na lde fes wl b 11 demn a thel v dlaltef l faIt fe their ngo lage extre cas. I ver dent Ryders ca tht I li done' witha murerer In Gera wh have moy ad .frends wol b' pwle a lw -l. ret for te cme'he ha cmmited Te outr.e pple te llwinto er w harb a admIster just ewtch' ors refuse. Tey rght Ter cas. pndIng i appars. tht I 'Justce. 1 L nb wl a- mnste it Te Abay Hed. lync Tlbt. cunty evelng 1cae tht smething wng Int1e ad tlton tle c1n 6t e' .eJ ao ts m n muer a 8ent e hag. c a tot1e. spreme .our ad ein taorder I ha drge It wer aong unt. pple Ta. bt cun ba cme t cncluon ecp ienaty hi terible crme Tey' fea cuts wer pweres jusio mit. to. ve justce' in' t t 'i 1 W has. muh te tat I b d Plor ament In t crna anas Gri sms unweale te goo n stte pace aa sety Is' cIten remoy thi e'1 b fond. mut b for. 'crmla spy tria ad &me point t whch trab sal Otheris ts sprt aachy wi gow unt Wil pOII' tve menae soiety. Fom 'e Ca.hou Ga. Tme ctens see fe tht woud. pumshed I te cous. Tis Sf tha t orer cors ha ate. prompty ad i R.de ha reeve 1s deer yea ave ben p dIsgace lyching. Whele he Ble Le. Florida Tims-Uno. Wecal ateton espeily the.RydC h'nch ng It1ustr te vey .strk. evi cnquencs. ht.low.tJom adminltqton c a laws. Te crim comite'by wps 'onl ta tr patleae t1\ ros cnseratve ommunly lcre was wi re la t.roessE.ot co r1. 1 cvlz ptrt mn oUgl to. advocate se that1n'the log rn i' wI detry cvl zaton ad rin countr 'whe l give hs rgh f Pate nngeacl wng b m Islns rih rl wllh l.s" strengh give i er sndIn thest te ctng trough Is ofcias wl WOni5 Jd 'vuDI crlma morewly ad te. st te uterly por is contrat. t shw.ti t i cern mot dastary Intxcusable ofmur 'deren .afer mnths year' of d 8Je i Inet. w strngly tem te bck te 'pwe they sutndere it state ad. whic .r wus misuse TE' Aiat Rublcs. Fom Dawson. Ga. goldbuls e- vac nt th tra Setting 'Matters Right. Keigwlnan buggyon J ' ron.m ab. Eaysttie ont fsat. particular' about- A Vlr lnla. goIng' I reslden Ylr rilals.the m th r as an Let 'lIon. .D. the s at ate as. .canJl ate f " overn r. the" demoeratsan. td al exec uve. e. The .m roUns worSe. 'lev 'uP. t 'had. d1spensa17.w1lski. InfalllbleSlgns. FromTbe splaluJofthecommonw lth man. tlonof world..he obeshutuptr lun3t1casyl asn. AShe nle . Y. at. to.1' nama h ngh4 6aYwhatrou ple3..ce.Jr Al1th aameJo . An'tI nran7th ° W-lIle. ii 'ff..c t crlmeJ refte Uon k welap le dal. 'by. Tants'and. he..c Ientl s rY I unlsh fessionthe.t h.aH. law 5elt-goY eIT "h. crt tr.w. fOrdamp1e e.5 5atls dey1Sedto .I Vi. 0. f. .ot. th. Q DSelJ o ca blE an al.tl q tado c arge o Qan thlDg'o str 1 Ii. Juryo t Spect' 'W it.or li nm bithe. .1ngihat tbe1n v'- iiW ' lway&\ 'a.ndr hlldwb Of. It'ts .away.the fn 1e. enough e.u ftt .in..g.o. .DOt t ookby itor p < try Js y 'QJllY' smtlrnent 11' 1 J t c .ItL w ro r6 I .PJiY.edO. ments.ln .Bq duetof. sa s 8UPP : lSpl com of sh uld d hasme en Unl "D0 1g1 a"I ngfirsi fendant S tlo Ed1torc the'.J "m -1 h hOWE Rualn..ii I L TtIorotngCon1ttUt1Ofl , 7t7 1bt .Veky 'outWttn. 1 3 r. ei o ill ot oo Ieo &e.ciipanle't tv turn i clfl t t WAI1N1TflNMctJ-ep.-1iLofl B&yStrect Vioo-te' NI &ai teenth f'u.ot Too NyIi nrick. F. to vi r 'o' o1 c GA m fe. p- -aii i i' lit 'Li I PAY Ile Nii' 3 Ta.kr n 1 i t i t o 'I -k o o j rcuit that,4 I and la1n .1 1 t -5 I -j nore -S j- .11. i -1 it .IN- he i r 1 S ifl I 1S92 av- th tl thedensocratic vIli oc- ex- gvesktng I'r.'ss it CO. itt e au I 5-re I ro I I ta.trir.g ca rrirs. thmsvEs de- s. wwu p1 nd tt wisi th hey cCttbIC o dts- much un- e 'a Is ci l'I" rt wheneyerone' bar be- theIr i theone ii this-raw St people-and 33.hT fl lesS pe a it a. S or S PEB.SONALS. lo theprofessors tununled 5,000 ci- 40- 1 montJs our kh diycs daughters'within S Birmingham. a .5. Pss0en.u w- us 8tc en C onel Wtne Remarkable Conversion. poisons his s' hil n' of en I" Setting Him Right. th au 1 'il Cr replies-almost Vhy lives de'summer D he "Dat -I da.ttvei" x" dOtw3'I doost "I'llcrow f Lati nd II fre th so- awakethese If- governor' maybe-laid dia.mondsculls L. -S .0 hand. while i- .5- s occurrence der' 'l'heynoted de- ii f andtho G tar ex- areforced better Ar or G ci us noaoon- oa jurors-in was th h the etUng0ulde .a if grouT1 so- e -hits -a or I in facilitate 1 crime-lie ad- tl'e an S FloridsTinaes-Unlon. that.ow committed--by wes 1'rocesse. 4e- it will atters S th severe"shaking WhOhad theattacksof brothethoadof the'federa. o' Xi 'Gadget' to.Panamalnstead .Sh sgIiL whatycu the Kl t'aiiie S. a and liberty-trial 1)0 First-In akzuei aL' upon Julyi2. abe fng our be to' case whatever taking ism comment ca.ites beltig Section Editor pass a toe - , . < - < . . . . ' . . * . . 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' \ ; . . ¬ . - ; : . - - . . , - . , { , . - , , ¬ . ' - ! . , , , , . " . , ¬ * , ' ¬ , ? - * , , ? " . . . . . ¬ . , , , " . " - , - , - ¬ . . , " . . " . , , . . " . ' : , " . , - ' . ; - . ' ' ; . . * , . . - " " ! - . : . , , . , > . " " . , . . ; . > . . ? , ' . . . ' . - > , . - . . . - : , , , . ' , , > , . , , ¬ . ; , . ' ' . * . - . , - - " - . . ' , , ' , " * , ' . . . - - [ _ - . - . " " , , , ' . " . ! . , : : : - " " * ; , " . : * ; - ; ( . ' { . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . \ ' . . . . . . . . ( " ) " . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : ' ' " ' . : . . . . ) ' ( ( < " . _ " . . ' . . . \ . . . . " . . . " ' . . . . . . . , - . . _ - _ . " - ! \ . ' . " . " ' - . " . } \ ' " " > _ ' . . : " . - , \ ' " . . \ . , " . ' ! " . > " ; . ! , ! . ( ; ' ' ' . ) ' \ . . , . . , " . . . ! ( , ; . . : \ ( . : " . " ' " \ ' , ' . . . ' . \ " } " . . " " , ; " : , ' : , \ - > . \ ' . : , } , . , . . . ! . , " . , . ! , . ( ( . ' , ! . . . " , . " ! - - - - - - - - - - . - - - = , . ( - ' ! . " , . . . . ' ! " ) " - ' ' , \ : ! " " < . ' , . ) " . ' ' , ( " . " , " ' ! " - : ' ( ' : . ' , \ \ } ) ' - ) ' . \ \ ' . ( " . ; ' , ' ' ' \ ( ( , ' ! , ( \ ( ! : ( < . ) - " ) " < : : : . : . ' . < " - . ' \ \ . . ! ! . . - " ' . . \ ) ' . ( = ( ! . . ( ( . ( ' ' . ( ) ' ! , ( , ( $ . ; ; ! ' " ( ( ) ' . ) , ? . , . , . . , . ' ( ( ' ( : ; ( ! ( ' - ' . ( { . ( ! . ! ; _ \ \ " ! ! ! ' ( ( ( ' ( ' > \ ' ( " . ! ! } ) ' . \ : ! ! : , ' , ) , > . , " ' \ . " ! ; : , ( " , - . ; " ' ' ' . : ! . ! " ' . ! : \ ! ' : : \ . ' - . . . " " . ! ' " : ] ; , < ( " : . \ . , , } . : ' . , ' ' , : ' " . : ! " " ( { " , ' < , ' ; ! , , , \ < . ! : ; ! ' " " > } ! : ! < . : , " ! , ! [ ' { < . ' . . , < } ' . \ ( : ( . ) \ , , ' ! . . . ! ! ) ! ( } ' \ \ ! \ ' < : ' : . ) } . ! " \ " . ' : . . . ' ' > . ; . < " " ' \ . . ! . : , : . } ' ! , . , ' ' . : \ . ) ! ' \ < . , ' . . . ' . . . < ' > ' ' [ : . : : " < " ( ' { . ' " . ( . ! . ' . ( ! ' } ' ( . 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' - - , . - - - ' - ' - - . - - , . . . . . ) . . . . . . . . : ( . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ) ) . . . . . . . . . . . . : ) . . . . . . . . . . . - . - ' $ - - . ' . - - ' - - - ' - _ _ _ _ _ . . \ \ , . ' , - * ( - - ! . ) - : ) ( ' , - - , . : ' . , , - - . - - ; _ _ _ . . . . . : : - ? ' - - . - . . - ' - ' ' - , - - - - , . , , ' . ' ' ( ' ' ' ' . - . - " - ' . " $ ' - . - . . - - % - - - . - " ' - \ " ' ' - . . - ' " ; ; ; . - . , ( } , ' . ' ' . . . . - . . . - . . . ! . - . _ - , , . - - ' - ; . - - ' . - ' ' ' , - _ . . . . ' - ' . ' ' ' - . - , ' . , . ( - - , . - - . - - - - . . - . . ' ' ' - - , ( , - - , ' ' - ' - . ' - ' , - - - . . - . . & ' . - & - ' - , ' ( - ' ' ' . , . ' - . . , & - - . . , - - - - - - ' - ' - . : ' , - , - . . - . - , , ' - ' ! . ' ' . - ' - - . ' ' , . ' - - , - , - - - ' , - . ' ' . - ' - , : ! * . _ ; : ' : , . ' ' ; ' ' ! ' - ) - ' & ' ' ' % . " ' , ' : ' . , ' : ' ' . ' ) ' . . , ' ( . . ' , '

Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 23 Jul 1897, Fri,
  3. Page 4

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