SptonSinclairSterling1927

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SptonSinclairSterling1927 - ,l Upton Sinclair's My Friend George Sterling"...
,l Upton Sinclair's My Friend George Sterling" demands special attention, because it Involves a serious question of taste, 1 find It unctuous, self-righteous, almost smirk-ingly virtuous. Sinclair informs us that he and Stirling courted the same woman, Sterling with "a hundred or so of sonnets, the most beautiful in the world," with phrases like "a star in alabaster." He Sinclair told her not to work so hard, that she looked like a skull. Mary Craig married Sinclair, after which, for a time, "there appeared a certain element of acerbity in the criticisms which George would pen upon the margins of my manuscripts." George Sterling drank, George Sterling believed in "the art-for-art's-sake devilment. George Sterling lived at the Bohe mian club, "a place of stayrs.' George Sterling submitted to the spell of Bierce: George Sterling is dead. Upton Sinclair, on the other hand, believes in the uplift, doesn't drink, plays tennis, and look at him! That ungallant contrast between the living reformer and the dead poet is stated In the context and implied in the tone of "My Friend George Sterling." Either Sinclair should have conveyed what light he had on Sterling by keeping himself out, or kept silent; for I think he adds little to our previous information. - unjust

Clipped from
  1. Star Tribune,
  2. 03 Sep 1927, Sat,
  3. Page 14

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