Clipped From The Akron Beacon Journal

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 - FLY NG AVIATION m E NER GOES ON SECOND SOLO...
FLY NG AVIATION m E NER GOES ON SECOND SOLO Landing Not As Good As First; Steyer Changes His Curriculum AVOIDS GROUND CRASH the By HAROLD J. TAYLOR Beacon Journal Aviation Editor Having advanced to the solo stage, my training as a pilot assumes a new interest. The first solo flight over, the trepidation with which subsequent flights are made gradually diminishes. At least that was my experience Tuesday night when I made by second flight alone. Prior to turning me loose again, however, my instructor, Al Steyer of the Robbins Flying Service, changed the curriculum and ordered me to do two 180 degree turns into the port. 1,200 Feet High To start this lesson I took the plane up to 1.200 feet altitude and flew straight back along the runway used for the landing, put the plane into gliding position and pulled back the throttle allowing the motor to Idle. The aim then was to swing the ejlane in a wide circle, and come back onto the runway on an ordinary glide for a landing. This maneuver requires consider able nicety of judgment of distance and the angle of -descent, and is quite valuable in . case the motor quits over the only or the best avail able landing place while you are flying tallwind. Circle To Right Down we swept, circling to the right. When I thought I was the proper distance from the port, I cut back, flying at right angles to the landine runway. When I was in such a position that I thought 1 1 could land by using a normal glide into the port, I turned rather sharply to the left and started down. This last turn I made a little too soon so Al instructed me to cut down the speed and distance by making an "S" curve as I neared the runway. We came In pretty fast, but I succeeded in setting down properly. After repeating this, Al gave me the thrill of the evening by once more bidding me adieu. Adjusting the stabilizer properly,' and shoving the throttle forward, I was off again. Is Bit Concerned I had received instructions not to come in until another student had landed his plane and took off again, so I had plenty of time to play around. I was a little bit concerned about the ease with which the plane gained altitude, continuing to do so even when I had it in normal flying position, partly, perhaps, because the stabilizer adjustment had not entirely made up for Al's weight. At any rate I was up 1,200 feet when I started my glide down. That meant I would have, to make a considerably longer glide than I had done the night before, and I somewhat surprised myself when I found I was coming in properly and didn't have to turn around and start In from a lower altitude. Is Fujly Prepared I was fully prepared to do some thing of the sort, but the runway lined up o. k., and without using my motor I made a passame approacn. The job of landing was only a few hundred feet away when I realized that another plane was in the lane I previously had used to get down I shifted the direction of my plane to the right a little to avoid a possible ground-loop collision, and came in bouncing. Luckily I remembered to use my motor and got straightened out all right. It wasn't as good a landing as I made on my first solo, but it could have been much worse.

Clipped from
  1. The Akron Beacon Journal,
  2. 10 Jul 1930, Thu,
  3. Page 27

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