wind 30

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wind 30 - Aviation Editor Takes Short Hop As Wind Halts...
Aviation Editor Takes Short Hop As Wind Halts Landings Southwester Of 15-20-Mile Velocity Inter- feres With Plans Of Pilot Al Steyer; Writer Flies To Municipal Airport By HAROLD J. TAYLOR Beacon Journal Aviation Editor A STIFF wind blew out of the southwest Monday. Its velocity Pilot Al " Steyer estimated at 15 and 20 miles an hour "too stiff for an amateur to try to shoot at landings." Consequently, after we made the takeoff at Stow airport, Al asked if I wouldn't like to take a little Jaunt over to municipail airport and back. I gave him the high sign indicating that that was o. k. with me. We climbed to 2,000 feet. I had not made the trip before, but I knew that I should follow the road which led straight south from Stow. A comparatively thick haze hid the destination. Picks Proper Angle Picking the proper angle at which to head the plane into the wind in order to avoid being drifted away from the road was a matter of trial and error. When I first started out I underestimated this considerably, and found the plane was drifting. Increasing the angle I "crabbed" back toward the straight narrow white ribbon of the road. This practice in keeping the plane in a straight path in spite of the wind drift is essential to cross-country flying, the first step in such a flight being to determine what angle into the wind must be maintained. Once this has been found, maintaining it becomes merely a matter of keeping the compass on that course, provided the wind direction does not change. And to be sure that the wind direction hasn't changed the pilot should check to find out whether his plane is traveling in a straight line. Only Few Minutes We had flown only a few minutes when Sprlngfied lake loomed on our left and the airport marked by the Goodyear Zeppelin dock, on our right. Al lives Just southeast of the airport. We went over in that neighborhood and circled around over his home and waved to the folks. The trip back to Stow airport did not take as long as that from it. We were with the wind and there weren't nearly as many bumps. Cross country flight, reducing the landscape to a checkerboard outlined by the ribbon-like roads and the houses to a succession of little toy huts is much more enjoyable than doing figure eights over a pair of barns. My only complaint against Monday's session was that it did not last long enough.

Clipped from
  1. The Akron Beacon Journal,
  2. 18 Mar 1930, Tue,
  3. Page 31

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