DARRIEUX APR 1938

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DARRIEUX APR 1938 - he he expediency. has between nlaces become his...
he he expediency. has between nlaces become his thought not ' who 1940. on water of crop doctrine join he Cordell Herring Herring , _ '. . . . Behind the Make *Up :««. By Erskine Registered U. S. to at and his jobs could pacing cover pollen the i' It 33 a crisp fall morning nm» the lady in Room 703 of a hotel on Hollywood boulevaixl is hungry. She picks uu the telephone at her bedside nnd 'asks the switchboard oiicrator to have some coffee and rolls sent to her room. But the operator operator cannot understand what she ! is saying.. 'fhe lady in Room 708 is French anil her.English is very^bnd indeed. She repeats her request for coffee coffee ami rolls and still the operator does not understand. Again the lady tries to make herself understood, understood, and this time the switchboard switchboard operator thinks she hears correctly. "I'H send them up. immediately,' she says. There is a knock presently oh the door of Room 708 and the lady within opens the door. Outside stands a bellboy--with two dozen pink roses. "Here are the flowers you just ordered," he says. That was six months ago, nnd the lady in Room 70S has moved into a Beverly Hills mansion, no longer gets roses when she asks for coffee and rolls. Her name is Danielle Darneux, French stnr of "Mayerlhg" and "Club de Fcmmes," and she has mnstereij English well enough to be working in her first American motion picture, "The Rnee of Paris.". Slim, hazel-eyed Danielle Darrieux, Darrieux, the mademoiselle* from Bordeaux, Bordeaux, is a Hollywood star without without ever having appeared in a Hollywood movie. Press agents at Universal, where she is under contract for five years at the reputed salary of a million dollars, were quick to discover her alluring figure, soon plastered it in every magazine ami newspaper in the country, Now, a f t e r six months of studying studying McGuffey's first reader and_ an unparalleled publicity campaign, Miss Dnrrieu.x is emoting on a sound stage, causing Universal executives executives to sing the Marseillaise every time they look at fier rushes. They say she's terrific, colossal --that fifty v million Frenchmen were right. _ Miss Darrieux likes Hollywood likes the way movies are made here Sl\c likes American slang and swing music and the drive-in sandwicl stands. "Ecet ees all wonderful,' she says. But she is scared to death o earthquakes. Someone told her they c o u t d n ^ ' b e felt while driving, so now she keeps her automobile parked ready to go outside her home; Miss Darriuux lives in a big house, with an inquisitive Scottie and her husband, Henri Decoin French war ace ami writer. Thej are surrounded by English-speaking English-speaking servants and a stuiHo secretary secretary serves as her interpreter to make interviews easier and speedier. speedier. No longer does she pose for still photographs in wholesale lots. She posed for 180 pictures the-day she arrived in 'New York, h u n d r e d s of others at the studio later. The photographs photographs have done their work-nine work-nine out of ten Americans woulc have no trouble identifying hei face--and legs. Miss Darrieux's father, Dr. Jean Darrieux, was n world-famous eye specialist who died of World'wai wounds. Her mother- is a singing teacher. At 14, Danielle discarded study of the violoncello at the Conservatoire Conservatoire de Jlusique, answered an advertisement in a French film magazine for a girl to play the lead in a French motion picture, and got the job. Before coming to America, she played in twenty-four picture?, one of which was authored by Henry Koster, who is now directing her. Universal executives saw her in "Club' de Femmes" and "Mayerling," "Mayerling," with Charles Boyer, and signed her to a lucrative contract. Universal hopes she will be the rage of the American screen when the picture is released, Chances ore good that she will. Her Inst two French performances were masterful, masterful, inspiring. She is beautiful and charming. Her nnme, she says, .is correctly pronounced Dahn-Yell Dah-ree-yeu, Universal executives don't care how it's pronounced just so it box-office. In Malaya, reports Clyde Elliott, Dorothy Lamour is the favorite movie stnr. The natives like her because she use,d the proper in singing a Malayan song for flicker. Her film "Jungle Princess" plea.sed the Sultan of Johore so much that ho. ran it off six in his palace. And he nlso told Elliott that he will seek an introduction to Dorothy when he to Hollywood this summer. Newspaper University OF AMERICA (HesJ.tercd U. S. Patent O f f Cap. Il37. P t M l p a, U n c QUESTIONS COLLEGE ASTKON.OMY--First Year 1--What is the name of the meteoric shower due today? ETYMOLOGY--Second Year 2--Where did we get the name "cork leg-? 1 ' CHEMISTiiY--Third Year ' 3--What gas was'most generally used during the Wbrld war? GKOGHAPHY-- Fourth Year I--Where is Ilarrancabermeja? - HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICS--First Year 5--Does salt water f r e e z e docs, what is the freezing ' point? · GRAMMAR--Second Year --Punctuate the following sentence: sentence: Their trouble was he \vt\s indolent and she a shrew, GEOLOGY--Third Year 7--What is the earth's litho-

Clipped from The Times20 Apr 1938, WedPage 6

The Times (San Mateo, California)20 Apr 1938, WedPage 6
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