Gypsies/Respectability

alicia62762 Member Photo

Clipped by alicia62762

Gypsies/Respectability - Ironically, the ones most in favor of a...
Ironically, the ones most in favor of a crackdown seem to be those with the most freedom themselves. "I get in too much trouble," explained explained Joe Houlihan, 15, of Kan-; old said "I'm spoiled." said "I'm spoiled," \ Susie Diltman, 1.^, of Tacoma, Wash., said she is "lazv because of too much freedom," But most of those we interviewed said they felt they would not be as strict on their' children as their parents are on them. At the same time, .IS per cent said they will not spare the paddle j as their own little ones are grow-i ing up, while ,12 per cent said they will spank less than they them-' selves were spanked, Barbara Wilson, 14, of Martins Ferry, Ohio, said she will punish her children more "because I wasn't, and I am not disciplined enough," and Kathy ffydc, 14, of said Dave Schrocdcr, 16, of Elm Grove, Wis. Others argued for less puni.shment: puni.shment: "Children should be guided rather than punishe<l," said Jerry Morgan, 15, of Kan.sas City. Mo,, and many joined Nancy Adams, 17, of Okemos, Mich,, in stating "I have never been spanked and my children won't be, either." The answers we received on homework indicated that some youth think their parents are hurting hurting them by doing their work, although although 54 per cent said they will give their own children more of an assist than they got. "f am having trouble now be- cau.se I was helped so much," said Perry Denniston. 17, of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, while 15-ycar-old Wayne Johnson of Kmgsporl, Term., said parents should help, but not "hand out an.swcrs" to home work. is going to help her children more with homework—but she adds: "I hope I can remember it better than my parents do." On clothes buying, 64 per cent will give their children more to say about what iJiey wear. "But first," .said Michael Sanders, Sanders, 14, of Franklin Park, III,, "I will explain the value of a dollar." ! "I feel this is one of the first ! responsibilities children should be ' given," said a Michigan lad, and ' Cheri Laxer, 14, of Detroit, argued that children, after all, know what ' styles they want. Barbara Hartleben, 15, of Rochester, Rochester, N, Y,, will give her children less leeway, because "I have bought some clothes that weren't worth the money," To pay for the clothes, and other other persona) ex^cn^es. !5 per cent of those we questioned said they girl. "I would be more conscious i of the value of a dollar if I had." Another, Debbie Taylor, 15, of W. Newton, Pa., believes if you earn your own money you won't spend it .so fast. 1 Almost ,50 per cent favored giving giving their children more responsibility responsibility for choosing their own companions—with companions—with proper parental advice—while advice—while only 13 per cent said they would give less authority than they have had. j As to choosing careers, 57 per cent said they would leave the de- I cision more up to their children, 'while only 7 per cent would be more active in their children's de-l cision than their own parents were. { "I think they will only be happy at what they want to be and not what their parents want," summed up Corinne Funderburg, 13, of So| erville, Mass. j Gypsies Being Pressured Into !Respectability; but They Resist By JOHN CROSBY CARTAMA, Spain — The gypsy was burnt wrinkled mahogany from working with the animals and he looked quite a lot like Anthony Anthony Quinn—powerful, watchful, mistrustful. We sat in a tiny bar this lovely, whdcwashed Anda- lusian village (not a whit different different from a lhou.sand other whitewashed whitewashed Spanish \illages except thai lis Virgin is doll-size and there's a sto'y goes with it) and ho talked of Kypsy life m 1%1 Vne gypsies, those uander- crs ovcT the face of r-Airopc, who will (the John Crosby legends say and they're mostly right) steal your eyeballs if you blink, arc finding life in the automobile age ho.stile. Gypsies do a lot of ihings. They make b;i'.kots. They tell fortunes. fortunes. They're still the world's, best practiiioners of the flamenco, Gypsies art the best tinkers in .Spain, The man at the forge in any Spanish town is still most likely to be a gypsy, Gypsies fix the pots and mend the pipes. BUT TIIITR RFAI. l .,e was hor-Ses a .nrl ili'",' k;;<)\v more a\xiu\ ,V',- '-s •.•v.i\ mWii-s lhan almost an;, "lie el^i', :ni Iml n;;, ;.if course, more v, -r. lo sie;il ihem. But the d,:i-, s of the horse and mule arc. a' v.e al! ko'iw, numbered. numbered. Th,.s IV liv i>\ ihe hor.se traeior. Nr.'.ivre ih,s of Iron f „r ;;i .n ss liic (rat -tor and the rar coming in more slowly tlian in Spam. You can ^till drive a hundred miles in any di red ion in Spain on back roads—which i.s to .say any dirt road, which is !)n per cent of thcin—and never sec a tractor and few cars, j Still, the gypsy said mournfully, the horse and mule are disappearing. disappearing. In the old days, a gypsy could go to a fair (there's a fair somewhere somewhere in Spain practically every day of the year and some gypsies do nolhing else but travel from fair to fair) and there he'd find maybe .'iOO horses and inules. Any lO-ycar-old gypsy girl could make off with seven or eight horses and mules out of a herd like that wilh- out atlracdng loo much ailenlion. Today, as few as .10 horses and mules will show up at a fair and i it would be a genius gypsy indeed who could steal one wilhoul arousing arousing an instant hullabaloo. Gypsies, said my burnt gypsy, are reduced tn earning an honest living. Ac-, tunlly. he didn't say it like that. Ho ralher implied that gypsies have always been wrongfully ac-' cu ,sed of ste;iling everything that turns up missing, from Goyas to that missile ihai disappeared without a I rare in ihe general direction direction of the moon sometime ago. There 's not Ihe sli).;hlesi tloubl that a few (if t !ie objeris thnf vanished vanished in Sp .Tin III the last iiionlh disnppt iirerl in 'o lln- potki -is of gypsies, but riMi. for hen'.en's sake, everyiliin;' Si :ll. just about r\erything is I'-fni ilie g\[)sjos gel blamed for. Tlie Sp.mish police have a time-teslod nieihod of extracting extracting confessions out of f^y?-• sics which dates dear back lo the lnf|uisilion. They jiisi l)f';i! (he whey oul of ihcm. If you beat him hard enough and long enough, a gypsy will confess to stealing Elizabeth Elizabeth Taylor away from Fddie Fisher. Or even the Stone of Scone out of Westminster Abbey. NOT LONG AGO IN a little Spanish town near here, a saloon , got hoisted for 5,000 pesetas. Sure enough, the cops landed on a gypsy, gypsy, but instead of beating him up, I hey beat up his kid brother until the older gyp.sy, not liking this much, confessed to stealing the dough which he didn't steal. My burnt gypsy tofd me mournfully that two Black Marias wander around Spain just picking up gypsies gypsies who are forced lo confess to thefts they didn't commit. This has made the life of the vagrant vagrant gyp.sy so hard that more and more they are settling down, alas, in the towns where they mend Ihe pots, make the baskets, and trade. It's a commonplace that any gypsy gypsy woman is worth 10 of the men. The burnt gypsy's wife, for example, example, buys cloth in Malaga and sells It for a profit in the little towns near Cartama. The burnt gypsy claims he pads out his wife's in-' come by working with the animals i in Ihe fields, Howavor, the talk around Car- lama is that mostly he sits on his^ behind and lets his wife work,' which IS fairly common practice, among gypsies and should be (I'm ; laying myself wide open for the • Go Jump In (he lake department of Ihe Union of World Women) be iriore widespiead evorywhere. Since they are the scapegoats of Spain, an honest g\'psy must be more honest, reverent, Irulhful, STRICTLY PER30IJAL Personal Preiudices By SYDNEY J. HARRIS "Iho ''e su^jcrior critics who constantly harange than almost anyone to avoid being blamed for everything that happens happens in the town in which he settles. settles. Consequently good gypsies are as trusted and trustworthy as the Bank of England, More and more, they marry outside gypsy ranks, alas, diluting their fiercely free per.sonalitie-s. TOWN LIFE IS GOOD for gyp- I sies but cities—at least the vil-^ lage g^'psies say this — corrupt them. "The Malaga gypsies sell their wives to the sailors," a village village gypsy told me scornfully. As for the gypsies of Granada, who live in picturesque caves feeding on hordes of tourists, his language got sulphurous. Nobody can be harder on a gypsy than another gypsy. And, in spile of the deplorable inroads of the automobile age and the pressure toward respectability and those Black Marias driving or urging the gypsy to disappear into the mass of civilians, it'll be a thousand or so years before the gypsies lose their wild, fierce, fresh, exuberant individuality. Just watch one dancing the flamenco, flamenco, turning her body into a scorching flame—-boneless, muscled, muscled, savage, and disciplined. Or watch a gypsy woman telling fortunes, telling her superb lies, while probing your soul to see how stupid (or intelligent), how weak- willed (or strong) you are, how much she can take you for, how quickly, and with what method. Or listen to a couple of gypsies talking Calo, the gypsy language in Spain, used frequently as a ihicves' language, so they can plan their confidence games right in front of (Jicir victim. Neiiher the automobile nor the Spanish police will subdue them in our lifetime. Ann Landers sympathized with people who break to the Whenever drink even he is John like this: rea.son at all. Yesterday said "I'd like the Cadillacs always nail It's a good these people This is not on the force. this letter. Here's miracles. officers are to another of work, the not so majority of DEAR ANN friend. He was had four dates him and I I said neither For the Then the letters letters casual sent me a pair "I'd love to His next "in a few I decided anymore. Three weeks want to hear Distance opinion you Now to resume marriage Ann Send them a stamped, •'proved over the previous generation; they have always declined, precipitously and alarmingly.

Clipped from
  1. Janesville Daily Gazette,
  2. 23 Aug 1962, Thu,
  3. Page 20

alicia62762 Member Photo

Want to comment on this Clipping? Sign up for a free account, or sign in