Clipped From The Atlanta Constitution

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 - The Dally Constitution. MORMM EDITION. ATLAXTA...
The Dally Constitution. MORMM EDITION. ATLAXTA GEORGIA.IJULY a 1868. 5 National Democratic Nominations. FOR PRESIDENT. HORATIO feCYMOUB of N. FOB VICE'rBESIDEST FRANCIS P. BL.VIU of Missouri. In the Union. Bj the action of the Georgia Legislature on yesterdaj in adopting the FourV enth Amendment w are according to Radical theory once more in th Union. Having uuifonnly and consistently opposed every measure of Radical reconstruction proposed for our acceptance earnestly believing that they were detrimental to the best interests of the State w hare no congratulations to offer our readers on the accession of Geor gia to the Union. A to the wisdom or fat. laey of this policy it remains to be verified whether we had not beat continued unuer military government longer in preference to flying from present ills to ills we know not of. We return to the Union under a Consti tution and State Government which have no foundation in the affections of oar people. In fact they are repugnant to a large majority of our fellow-citizens whilst history proves the impracticability of all laws and governments foreign to the sentiments of the people for whom they are instituted. -Cy adopting the Amendment we entitle ourselves to representation in Congress and it may be. relief from Federal military rule. But what advantage do we derive from representation in the higher law con clue at Washington or from exchanging the rule of the regular military most of whose officers are gentlemen and whose government has been as lenient as we could have expected for a rag and bob-tail militia likely to be composed in the main of such material as thai which under Brownlow curses down-trodden Tennessee. By the enfranchisement of the lowest class in our midst without distinction and the whole sale disfranchisement of our best citizens we have certainly taken a retrograde movement not at all in consonance with the progressive spirit of the age. It r miis to be seen whether the representatives as well as the people of Georgia will not bitterly rue the action taken by them OB yesterday. A "Word to the Negroes. I The sooner the negroes in the South learn to appreciate the true estimate in I which they are held by the Radicals the better it will be for their social as well as I political status. That they have been more I inclined since the close of the war to give I heed to that party than to their former I owners and friends was to hare been ex- I pected from a superficial view of the free- I' dom resulting to them as a consequence of I' the war. But when they reflect that their I emaBcipaGonwas not sought by the North I' through any special love of the Northern I people for them so much as for the sup- I posed political adTintag it would give the I party claiming the fruits of the war in the L future conduct and control of the Govern- I vent the humanitarian view of the ques- I tion is lost in a motive of selfishness wholly I foreign to the well being of the negro. We I have no disposition in the least to preju- I dice the negro against that class with whom I they have seen fit to ally themselves po- I litically but simply to present facts as the/ I occurred in the past and as they are daily I transpiring in our midst I From the earliest settlement of the conn- I try whenever it served his individual ends I the Yankee has sustained to the negro a re- I lation 'of the most selfish and mercenary I character. Influenced by the profit of .British commerce in the African slave II trade the Yankee in conjunction with his I brother across the water was the author of I his slavery on this Continent He introduced him into the country by selling him I into slavery at a time when the trade gave I profitable employment to his vessels and I filled his pockets with the proceeds. In I the course of events as the Western and I Southern States were opened to settlement I his labor proving more valuable in the productive fields ot these than the sterile I plains of New England the \ankee with his usual far-seeing money-making sagacity sold slavery into these States and with the proceeds built towns cities railroads and established manufactories at home as the basis of his future wealth. These are facts which no one familiar with the conn- I try will gainsay. The West and South baving'expanded into immense agricultural and planting regions whilst New England with a barren soil and an increasing population forced to apply her genius and in- dustry'to manufacturing interests in time found it indispensable to her own prosperity to demand aTspedes of protective legis. lation -which was inimical to the interests Bbf th ether sections. la order the more certainly 10 gain thai eadjt was necessary Hko cultivate in the non-slaveholding States KVe&Unuoti stronger and of mor direct KippVl to the popular heart than that" of protection"to uome.Tndustry/ Hence sac2 tioning the abolition 'already prevalent in England. shWentered upon a crtfada against slavery Whenever she in fc art advance movement' by Vwhiefi we gained the least Jadvantage the benefit accruing was ft. once entered to \hi credit f JwMlndrvWuld interests. And it willU seen in th progress and davel. opmentof the anti-slavery movement in the United States that as it gained in strength New England invariably appropriated' the result to her benefit The war was pro- 11 waged in the interests of the Union but taking the result as the standard by which its real motive shall lie adjudged and every unbiassed mind must confess that its controlling object was the extension o political power by a party who had adroitly handled 'the slavery question in making i subservient to their own ends Aside from the political capital which the Yankee has made and still expects to make out of the negro at tha South he has little more regard for him than for a mere brute. Were it otherwise at the North where he feels himself sufficiently stron of his own race to control he would not as shown by the popular elections there during the past year in which the question o negro suffrage was the controlling one hare voted overwhelmingly wherever th proposition was submitted to deny th negro the right of suffrage. In every State of the North the negro element is so small as to cut no important figure in their popular elections and yet despite the superior fitness and qualification of the black ma of the North by virtue of his education and intelligence for the exercise of th franchise rite over the black man of th South he is there denied that privilege because he is too small in numbers to b wielded for party purposes. In the South wherever the negro element predominates the Yankee adventurer from the North i sent out for the purpose of using it as jneans to office. A favorable omen of the times is th gratifying intelligence which daily reaches us from all quarters of the South as to th increasing disposition of the negro to take a correct view of the situation. and to accept the facts in the light of their true philosophy. The more intelligent and reflecting of the race those who are disposed to take counsel of reason and common sense are jip&ing up to their real condition. The order in which nature created them am the difference between theirs and other races they must accept as dividing lines which no human agency can destroy. Go having created them differently and circumstances peculiar to themselves the must accept his providence and await th final issue. Their natural relation to th white race they must acknowledge and ob serve despite all the legislation friendly o unfriendly of men. Hence as no incorporation of the Indian a race once inhabitin the entire country into that of the white race has ever occurred there being such in congruities between the two as to forever separate instead of to draw them in to a social or political equality th same causes operating in a greater de grec must act as an effectual bar to like social or political equality in the same government between the white and th black man. The white men of the South to the "man ner born feeling still as thoy ha\e eve felt an abiding interest m the welfare o the negro as the problem of his destiny unfolds should it give promise of other fruits than those at present realized wi not be slow to recognize the hand of Go and to shape their conduct according to the dictates of justice and wisdom. BORROWED LIGHT. A Troy poet publishes a campaign song beginning thus "Itoll on I roll on O glorioat Soar' whereupon the New York Sun facetiously appropriates the compliment to itself. Now we are unwilling that the poor poet sha be robbed of his glory in this way am we pronounce the act of the Sun a positive plaigiarism. Now the poet under the inspiration of the theme imagined his hero to be of all the objects in the visible univers next in importance to the great luminary and in order to make the descent more graceful sounds his octave one key note above the object of his adoration to give ns an idea of the "musical fall and flow. And yet the New York Sun has the audacity to appropriate the poets happy apostrophe to the great source of light The case justifies action for damages. JSTlt seems that the old Hindoo barbarism of Butt or burning widows is no extinct but in spite of the progress of civilization there are still fanatics who clin to the horrible rite with all the tenacity o true conservatism. .Vet York Tribune Here is a case in point for the moraEt party. It is diseased and they must treat it with the most effectual remedies. The should not sleep until this barbarism i wiped out This is but a part of that little contract to reform the world which the have to do. Old Mother Greeley must see to it that they do not dodge the responsibility. There are several other important jobs which we shall suggest to them in due time. s rThe'tfewtYork Son denies that it is neutral in politics but claims to be Inde pendent -The Bui -pendulates between tweedle-dnm and tweedk-dleej with a lean ing slightjyjto twe dle-deej. ty General Uowell Cobb. spoke in Athei i with great effecfon Friday nlghi to a" very large and enthusiastic audience. t. f'l'hiD C n8tlt il n 'AILY I . I ilORNINGEDITIONa 7' C. ATLAXr W G 1..f Ll':2"J. Denaocratlc-'lomln tlon& 1 rnESIDE llOR TIOjC MOURot'N. y TORVICErrnESro - n. II Diibe' of G .Le laturc. ieateN&y.1n Ame dment e ani ccordi 'g .theorr..onee m ' in'the JIarin uuitormlj'.and con ed tDe&snreof feeonl ctio1 prop to belieT lg ere d trime fa1 the 5t at w. oUrre de. oCOeor- U Aj 'to'tJ ' icy Wl er D I ng )1ofot. We onsti- they repu t. f gonrn ntsforeigutOthe Wash n.wton. governmenthas as' t alwhich" enfran mcnt our w ole- wohlYe ccrtainlytaken th nma 1s Littcrlyrue AW onl 500nertheD ha "e inclined 6in clo 1o war.'to conseq ence ut e1lDciJ fionwas or' politi lad"antage.it w uld & war. m'entthe m tive disp sition presentC& as setUem nt trr.whenevcr a. J r n uencedby omm ce Y . acr 'his o tbecountry h em lo1JI1ent pockets. In' I 'the courseofevent.s Sta eawerC la CtNew ee. far seeing Uy.IOldal&r rrinto the uilt t , .andestabliahed 'the These l oone willg y. ring 'expan to lm n d plantingregionswbUat th tion. forccd'io 'get iua naauCactuiing'1nteres .In' in pen&abl. to' .1 4 Cprotecti".legUr , the1ntere fib. ei.heraocUoua. the. d1ah 4I pill eu1Itt'ate.tD the. n n-alaT h 1 ntpuotJ more" \\to po ularbearf .tJw1tl t ir pitectio L m mtUltgt "el1 tio Ig a'bo.l.itfon. .pre.rJ t. e J na. nat llaTirTW1ieniner\ahe . . 1 .by &It J.east. : t gr.u t. OD O. .to J' adki u i will be .he prosreuand or anti g&i i l"ba iitr New-England inuriablyappropriatecfU1' 'w&a'pro theiAtere . ihe.'t1 b a. whi h moti"eahall unbiasscdmind ust.eonre8&that it t ett of dthe n n it t eD theYank e s out.oC atthe'Southhehu mo othe 't.ith rth strong oChisowD wOQld'noti. popuw-electionathere 01 one the the Sorth.the I th the the be partypurposea. is outror a cans the int lIigence rca bcs the Tiewor accept counselor "ng o er and bet -een races. dcstr God they the andob- or inhabiting such'in- the cau es e e".cr felt in or th will LIGHT.-A 0..1 Su. r' X ew that'the shall and actor X ow le d scent. nio 'e ' theXew It "ol' burningwidowll'is 'not progresaof ci cling of conservatism-Net. mo .Iity andt. ey .They is sis ut apart at 'fit Ie contracttorco they hATfI'undertak I to mUl d thores 01IS1 ilitf. impOrtantjobl luggesi.to "The 1t . ork ut tn : . i tw tWeedtMt .1 . bg 1i41l r : u" to f 1' Cobb'.IPoketD -t1 J" t.01 Frldaynllht ent UllAstlc au.d1e c r DIII4Y 4 OIOflGA JUI.Y Nomtu otN. VICE rrnsftr. B'the thfS we re tzmca1 acceeson A5t&theom i1 Intact thererepugnanttoahrge ins be . th w rsmai is egroes. thenegroes V V V politiIvta.it V f t pIStIid sstheysredaUy V V mnuen erce hisslaveryon him is Ne .nkee uaI soldalat ry t w s tio jto 4exnflaV5pedes os lnter t f .hi gntha 0 eu vat moridiie p d pouta'beaz th f saC prev4wt shejtered Wlienevr wadS atJ .by 'rbic1' t onenthred ti Jijjual seenin opment Lb aln 1Itre1gth f andevery w powerby apsitywb main V outof the'South V 6rth wotdnot V. ng the ob- 'in- the th thenegro b - songbeginning -It new Bufleeor xnohllty Thus ps'of Ieymuztseetottthat TheewYokSunienies i neutrslinpolitic4but'elaims..to V 1i-dum andsele&t I W4d1d 'V T-- V 'V.1 COtb..spoke t4 ivety . . , . . ) * * - . . , . , ' , . . , . . , , , , . , , ¬ . * . , . . \ ¬ ¬ . - , ¬ . - , . . * , , , - \ , - . , ¬ , ¬ ¬ . * ¬ , , . " . , . , , , - - ' ' . , ' , - * , - , - . - - , / , - , , - ' . . , , , - , . ; , , - , \ , - , - - , , , , , , . - " . 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Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 22 Jul 1868, Wed,
  3. Page 2

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