Hugh Maxey

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Hugh Maxey
 - THE REGISTER-NEWS — MT- VERNON. ILUNOTft...
THE REGISTER-NEWS — MT- VERNON. ILUNOTft Covington, Ohio, witli Night by E. Van Winkle second. by E. James was ~ Cricket by Glen Waltonville, was — April Foutch and Strode beat a field the wire. Second by George la. — 2-yaer- old Sablo, owned by Willow Hill, 111., of eight young the $500 purse Sab 0' Rip, Eubank of Willow owned luka, was third. transportation Ferrill, "will one of a series some definite Mt. Vernon Chamber considers important our economy county's population increase, it is matter receives deserves." Rend Lake college, government private bus are being Thursday's SHOPPING 9:30 P.M. Plenty cooling, wa* ter •valve. • • • taH^ breakfast Practiced in Mt V. Before Moving To Missouri Dr. Hugh Maxey Recalls 50' Year MeJieal Career The interesting career of Dr. Hugh W. Maxey , who began .his practice of medicine in Mt. Vernon over 50 years ago, is described in a recent feature article in a newspaper at Jefferson City, Mo. Dr. Maxey, now retired, resides at 1238 Elmerine Ave. in Jefferson City. Dr. Maxey began his career in Mt. Vernon after receiving his medical degree at Washington University in St. Louis. In the early years of his practice he assisted his father, the late Dr Moss Maxey, a pioneer specialist in the fight against tuberculosis. He moved to Jefferson City, Mo. and began his practice there in 1.923. He spent 15% years working as a physician at the Missouri Slate Penitentiary, doing surgery on and with the help of inmates. His service as a parison doctor was only a small part of the 50 years he devoted to the practice of medicine. Like his late father, he recently was honored by the Missouri State Medical Association for a half - century of service. "I leceived a pin and a certain amount of so-called honor," the 75 - year - old doctor said, "for outliving my fellow practi- t'oners. It seems outliving everybody is not such a great achievement." Dr. Maxey recalls how he received help, at one time or another, from bank robbers and convicted murders while serving as resident physician at the prison. "If you could get a bank robber or someone skillful with his hands, it was amazing how quickly you could teach him," Dr. Maxey said as he told of his private rehabilitation program at the maximum security prison. -o- -o- -o Living and working in a prison is not as dangerous or anxiety - prone as some would believe, the doctor said. "My trouble was always with the civilians, not the inmates," he said. Working with inmates, Dr. Maxey got things done. "There is a rumor that the only time I got the hospital painted — after filing requisition after requisition — was when one of the men started painting and painted it from top to bottom," he said. "A couple of years later someone said, 'Don't you know he stole every drop of paint used m there. You never got a pint of paint on requisition." "I met that prisoner later at one of the farms and I asked him, 'What about you stealing that paint?' "He told me, 'You know I wouldn't steal any paint, doctor. But if someone sets it down, I take care of it for him.' "After that I was careful what I wished for," Dr. Maxey said. If prisoners couldn't help Dr. Maxey one way, they helped another. "Most of the surgery I did out there I did with irjTiates' help. . . though some of the things I did I had to spend time reading and preparing for them," Dr. Maxey said, -o- -o- -o- Dr. Maxey recalled some of the problems his father, the late Dr. Moss Maxey, faced. "I lived- tlirough a most interesting period in the development of medicine," He said. "For instance, I remember my father's worries '.viUi diphtheria antitoxin." He also has a "a vague recollection of the time when my father, against the advice of wise men of the profession, removed an acute appendix, in 1897." (That event dimly remembered by Dr. Maxey was the first appendectomy ever performed in Jefferson county. It was shortly after Dr. Moss Maxey's graduation from medical school.) The successful operation, in a Mt. Vernon drug store, was performed by Dr. Maxey with tlie assistance of Dr. Harry Moss of Carbondale and the late Dr. Andy Hall of Mt. Vernon. One of the things Dr. Hugh Maxey is most proud of its the hospital he set up at the prison, arid its blood bank. "We got a call from the University Medical Center one time," he said. "The university needed a large amount of a rare type blood and asked if I could have some donors ready when the university blood unit arrived. "When they got here, I had 50 men ready, 50 at the front of the hospital, 50 in the hall, and 50 more passes sent out. I doubt if that many blood donors anyplace else could have been that efficient." Maxey is also proud of one of the other medical institutions he has had a part in, tlie Ellis Fischel State Cancer Hospital at Columbia. -o- -o- -o- In 1937, when the bill was before the Missouri state legislature, Maxey said he saw in the measure an opportunity for the chief physician "to get rich and give poor service to poor people. That looked like a hell of a poor chance to me for poor people." The bill provided that the physician could admit his own private patients, who paid him for tiieir services. Maxey went to a committee hearing on the bill presided over by Sen. Michael Kinney. Maxey said he told the hearing what he felt about the poor part of the bill. "I was hissed and booed. Sen. Kinney stopped them and told me to go ahead," Maxey said. Sen Kinney apologized, Maxey said, because he did not realize the provision was in the bill. He said that part of the measure would not reach the Senate floor. "I have always been happy about having been able to have d pai't in that, "Dr. Ma.\cy siad. -o- -o- -o- Dr. Maxey is the stepson of Mrs. Ethel Maxey of 1303 Main street, Mt. Vernon. He is a cou- sni of Emma Henry of 15 Homestead, Roy Maxey of 40i North street, and Mrs. Lou Young of Bluford. WORLDALMAMC FACTS There is a popular bat erroneous belief that cobwebs are merely dust. The World Almanac observes. The fact is that cobweb means spider web, cob being an old English word for spider. Most cobwebs are the work of a little house spider whose handiwork usually goes unnoticed until it becomes covered with dust. Copyright® 1968, Newspaper Enterprise Assn. TALKS WITH AITORN'EY—Sirhan soft-spolfen words uitli just before leiuliig a was granted an additional two murdering Sen. Robert F. as Sirhan walked to (.VP Pray Roserjgary3 mR YOU PARKING ease pain of HEMORRHOIDS YOUR NEWS QUIZ PART I - NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL Give yourself 10 points for each correct answer. 1 George Gallup and Louis Harris are two of our nation's best-known.... a-newsoasters b-poU-takers c-slapstick comedians 2 Representatives of 17 nations, including the United States and the Soviet Union, met again In Geneva to continue discussing .... a-East-West trade b-disarmament e-offshore fishlDg rights 3 Americans began paying the new temporary income tax surcharge. While the surcharge is in effect, most wage earners will pay .... per cent more Income tax than they did before, a-10 b -25 c -50 4 Senator Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts and Senator George McGovern of .... were both being mentioned as possible Democratic presidential candidates. a-Wyoming b-South Dakota c-Pennsylvanla 5 Baseball's National League agreed to group its teams into .... divisions during the 1969 season. The American League earlier had decided to do the same. a-two b-four c-six VERNON REGISTEENEVVS CITY FEDERAL SAVINGS INSURANCE REX/\LL REAL July 23, word clues with pictures or symbols. correct answer. B RICO AEROFLOT 1 In foreseen 2 Harriman, diplomat talks U.S. area 16th 4 markets to keep of buying 5 frown freedoms land 6 began

Clipped from
  1. Mt. Vernon Register-News,
  2. 22 Jul 1968, Mon,
  3. Page 5

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