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Eos Amaeles (S -rates DAILY 35c DESIGNATED AREAS HIGHER THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1992 COPYRIGHT IMZTHETIMESMIRRORCOMPANYCCtV ISO PAGES CIRCULATION: U64J88 DAILY 1.531,527 SUNDAY All 4 5m KJLeg Beatles Acquitted Violence Follows Verdicts; Guard Called Out Laurence M. Powell, center, and Timothy E. Wind hug after they and Stacey C. Koon, right, were acquitted. COLUMN ONE To Women, 1992 Could Be the Year New political dynamics are at work, as races in Illinois and Pennsylvania show. Record numbers of females are running for high office and candidates find fund raising easier. By PAUL HOUSTON and MARLENECIMONS ' TIMES STAFF WRITERS WASHINGTON About midday on Tuesday, when Lynn Yeakel sensed that she had done the amazing and come out of nowhere to win the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania, she called the president of the National Women's Political Caucus. "I hope the women will get the credit," Yeakel told caucus president Harriett Woods. "I feel that women are standing up and making this possible." Yeakel was expressing a hope 2 shared by many this election year that 1992 will become a historic turning point for American women, the year in which they finally begin to significantly increase their numbers in the nation's councils. Though they constitute more Plcue see WOMEN, AM Verdicts Greeted With Outrage and Disbelief Reaction: Many cite videotape of beating and ask how jury could acquit officers. A few voice satisfaction. By AMY WALLACE and DAVID FERRELL TIMES STAFF WRITERS Outrage and indignation swept the city Wednesday as citizens rich and poor, black and white, struggled to reconcile the acquittals of four Los Angeles Police Department officers with the alarming, violent images captured on a late-night videotape. "If something in you can die, that something died," said the Rev. Cecil L. Murray, who, like countless others, sat spellbound before a television screen as verdicts were read that cleared the officers of criminal wrongdoing in last year's beating of black motorist Rodney G. King. Surrounded by a small group of other clergymen in a basement meeting room of his First African Methodist Episcopal Church in South -Central Los Angeles, Murray could only close his eyes, fighting back tears, and label the verdicts a tragedy. "Not because it's unbelievable," he added, echoing the cynicism and bitterness that sprang from homes, streets and meeting halls throughout Los Angeles, "but because it is believable. . . . You think rational people will be at least semi-rational. You think civil people will be at least semi-civil. But to come back and see them completely whitewashing something that the whole world witnessed this is a brutali- Pool Photo zation of truth." The verdicts drew fervent reaction virtually everywhere. A widely outnumbered minority voiced satisfaction with the acquittals. Among them was Barbara Williams, who stood with friends outside the courthouse after the verdict, expressing her support for the Please see REACTION, A24 Researchers 'Reanimate' Dead Animals' Hearts By ROBERT STEINBROOK TIMES MEDICAL WRITER In a series of experiments in lambs and goats that seem straight out of science fiction, surgeons at Loma Linda University Medical Center have "reanimated" hearts that have sat lifeless within dead animals for as long as 45 minutes and successfully transplanted them into other animals. The researchers say that these preliminary findings, if confirmed and deemed ethically and legally acceptable for tests in humans, could dramatically expand the supply of human hearts for organ transplants. Because of an extreme Please see HEARTS, A26 Trial: Governor deploys troops at mayor's request after arson, looting erupt Ventura County jury apparently was not convinced that videotape told the whole story. By RICHARD A. SERRANO and TRACY WILKINSON TIMES STAFF WRITERS SIMI VALLEY Four Los Angeles police officers won acquittals Wednesday in their trial for the beating of black motorist Rodney G. King, igniting renewed outrage over a racially charged case that had triggered a national debate on police brutality. Hours after the verdicts were announced, angry demonstrators torched buildings, looted stores and assaulted passersby as civic leaders pleaded for calm. Gov. Pete Wilson deployed the National Guard at the request of Mayor Tom Bradley, who warned residents to "stay off the streets." Bradley, in a late-night televised address to the city, said a curfew may be imposed tonight if the violence continues. Wilson's decision to send in the National Guard came after rioters touched off more than 150 fires, stormed police headquarters and trashed numerous downtown buildings. Sporadic gunfire flared in the streets, and heavy smoke rising from the fires forced the authorities to reroute landing patterns for aircraft at Los Angeles International Airport. By late Wednesday night, authorities had linked four deaths and 106 injuries to the violence. Some people were pulled from their cars and beaten. It was the largest rioting to erupt in Los Angeles since the Watts riots of 1965. Acquitted were Sgt Stacey C. Koon and Officers Laurence M. Powell, Theodore J. Briseno and Timothy E. Wind. Jurors apparently were not convinced that a videotape of the March 3, 1991, beating of King represented the entire story. One juror said that Kinit. by being combative and ignoring the officers' orders, brought the beating upon himself. The 81 -second video, filmed by an amateur, showed officers delivering repeated baton blows and kicks as King rolled on the ground. Its images have been seared into the minds of viewers the world over who have watched the tape broadcast repeatedly. A visibly angry Bradley said he was left "speechless" by the "senseless" verdicts and urged the city to refrain from violence. "The jury's verdict will never blind the world to what we saw on the videotape," Bradley said. The not guilty verdicts by a Ventura County Superior Court jury which included no blacks-were reached after seven days of deliberations. For three days, the ' jury forewoman said, the panel focused exclusively on a single count of assault against one of the Please see VERDICT, A22 - - KJRKMcKOY UnAmriaTtoW Flames engulf a row of businesses at Vermont and Manchester. Rioters Set Fires, Loot Stores; 4 Reported Dead Rampage: 106 are wounded or injured and more than ISO blazes are ignited. Bradley considers a curfew. By MARC LACEY and SHAWN HUBLER TIMES STAFF WRITERS Rioting mobs ignited fires, beat motorists and looted stores and offices Wednesday night throughout Los Angeles as fears of race-related violence came to pass after the acquittal of four Los Angeles Juror Says Panel FeltKingActions Were to Blame By SHERYL STOLBERG TIMES STAFF WRITER In the end, the now-famous videotape 81 seconds of footage that shocked the world with its grainy images of a prone, seemingly defenseless Rodney G. King being clubbed by Los Angeles police officers didn't matter. Instead, it was what King did before the camera started rolling that prompted a jury of six men and six women to return verdicts of not guilty in the celebrated trial of Officers Laurence M. Powell, Theodore J. Briseno, Timothy E. Wind and their sergeant, Stacey C. Koon. Please see JURORS, A2S police officers in the beating of Rodney G.King. , Initial reports linked four deaths to the rioting, and at least 106 others were treated at area hospitals for gunshot wounds and other injuries believed to related to the rioting. Among the injured was a firefighter who was shot in the face. Gov. Pete Wilson ordered the1 National Guard to report for duty as scattered demonstrations evolved into the city's largest riot since Watts erupted in flames in 1965. In a drama that unfolded on live television, violence erupted first at the intersection of Florence Boulevard and Normandie Avenue in. South-Central Los Angeles and radiated to areas throughout the city. Before the ' night's end, more than 150 fires raged in the city and sporadic gunfire flared in the streets. ' Mayor Tom Bradley, in a grim televised address shortly after 1 p.m., said the city will "take what- ever resources needed" to quell the violence. He said the city was receiving assistance from the county Sheriffs Department, the California Highway Patrol and Police and Fire departments from neighboring cities. "We believe that the situation is; now simmering down, pretty much under control," Bradley said. "Stay; Please see RIOTS, A21

Clipped from
  1. The Los Angeles Times,
  2. 30 Apr 1992, Thu,
  3. Page 1

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