hd1.2

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hd1.2 - outgrown. How we enjoyed the pretty...
outgrown. How we enjoyed the pretty "store-bought" effcvts of these antique garments after they were turned and pressed and cut into good style And the secret pleasure of cheating some one Into the belief that the goods had "run the blockade and cost an enormous sum of confederate money. Whenever one was so fortunate as to appear In something new or the old with the new effect the common question was "where did you get your new dress. or th.it pretty ribbon or lace In our class many of the girls were in moderate circumstances and could not be xp td to buy e goods. In view of this fact our l -loved and considerate teacher conceived the happy idea of having each member of the class as he expressed It "throw a garment around herself which would make Jefferson Davis tip his hat" it must be of the confederate homespun home-woven goods made from the home-grown cotton aid dyed with the home dyes and fashioned at home by the hands of our own mothers and sisters. Then came the time for development of skill and ingenuity in the loved ones at home who set about to accomplish the task imposed by the good teacher's suggestion. Then came the carding the spinning the dyeing the weaving the cutting and the making of these graduating gowns for the dear absent girls. T.i-- ch v jjcd in ui" > a pretty piece of dress gooJs in those days was to give the homespun cloth a "store bought" ap pearance. To nave sail trat iliry'i dress Took' an eli-.spp.t gingham worsted or even silk raw silk often being Imitat ed was sufficient praise and compensation for all of the tedious work and time expended upon It. how hignly prized was a hank or so of genuine "Turkey red" thread could the same be found It was can fully arl p.'T.-Tiirvtily us- 1 to make the greatest display sometimes a thread or so tari'ttii ii .nt Wall' .r nii'.r.g. or b.i to brighten the dull leaden-colored home- dyed background or body of the goods an3 again la brier-stitch or herring-bone embroidered edge of collar and cuffs. This neat trimming bad a wonderfully fine effect to\tri relieving toe plafhress ana plied hence it had been presumed by some of the girls that I would not comply with our principal's 'request especially as It was not compulsory and a wager was laid to the effect that on commencement occasion I would array myself In the most becoming "store bought" dress I possessed. Totally unaware of this surmise and wager against me I walked proudly into the chapel on commencement morning dressed for the first time in my new homespun frock astonishing even myself with its fine effect for it had at a little distance every appearance of all-wool goods. There was a ripple of excitement whispers ran high among the girls and I a rd one of them say "I told you I knew she would not wear homespun. I humored the joke by feigning not to have overheard the remark. One of the girls purposely took a seat by me and felt the cloth then laughingly whispered to me "It is really homespun but I'll not tell It. because I've lost my bet. Another said "Dear me I have lost a wager on your dress. I said you were too patriotic not to wear homespun on this oc casion but lo here you are au-rayed in fine 'store clothes. The dresses each and all were illustrative of how necessity was e means of developing talent In those times of dis tress and deprivation. They were also an evidence of the ability of our heroic south ern women ti-aceompllah treat things in times of Important emergencies. Not the least wonderful of the developments of those times of poverty and dearth was seen in the genius displayed by skilled "back country" women who brought to such a high degree of perfection the art of adding bright colors to our homespun In the manipulations of different parts of dye yielding plants of our wo ds and fields. Ma of these country women made a regular bud' ness of dyeing threads they had made im portant discoveries in the pursuit of their art. It la needless to say that on this special occasion the. adyide and. assistance of tb mast skilled dyers of each neighbor hood were brought into requisition by our mothers and guairdians. on the stage that day If the 're presi mone was. 'OU yc r mani' s "xp' bu con l erata hat"-it al t.ashl ne,1 moth rs Ol S S t aC ompli h impo ed 11. T. h { vc" C 1 II to l.irr' dre s L n el'gJ t ed" uJ. n pr.z d o c uld card 'Y'C U gre test .n "r 1ir. u t t lJrig lLen 1. .c1en- ol red h me- k t an brier- tltch jo cun -bad tn pre umed wag r commen ement dre sed E head 1 r ally be- ause oc- 'OU 'stor t t UIl1 eroJc .a.ccomPlll\h em nc1es. nd s en dltrer t i w RllY I f o oJe\Zg s b 1 I ecal th adtl lled 4 el 0. n st e eff 'ts d txp-ne iv e 0 ap- na a ! Itk arfuIt er.i" dv display-sometimes tflrs I ii u Wa p r , b ef- an re- dis- em woeds lIaty Im- P.nl thg yera . " - " , ! " , " . , , , " ( , . , ? " : . - ¬ , ¬ , " " , - , - , . , . , ' ¬ . , ¬ , , , . . - _ - : ; , < = " > , " " ¬ . ' - ; ; : > - . . , , ( ¬ ) , . . " " , ! ' . - - : . > . ' . . . . ' . : , , - ; , - , - . . ¬ . ; ' ' , , " " . , ¬ , , - . , : " ; . " ¬ . , , " , ' . ' . " : " , . ¬ , , ! - ' . " " , , ¬ . ¬ . ¬ - ( . " " , ! - . > ' > ' ¬ ; ¬ . . . ¬ . ' . . . . ( ) ' " ' ( ' ! } ' ! " } " ' - \ \ " . . : ) ' . ' ' . . , . " ' , , < , . } " ' . 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Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 10 Mar 1895, Sun,
  3. Page 2

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