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 - WASHINGTON TIMES, SATUCRDAT, JULY 15, 1911.,...
WASHINGTON TIMES, SATUCRDAT, JULY 15, 1911., nmeni mn lino I TTT ULU OUL, I UU, fllUO NAVY YARD OUTING Children and Weary Mothers Who Yesterday Were Guests of the Navy Yardifmployes Smiles His Best to Make Blaze and Tired Mothers Happy. Bowery," GREAT SUCCESS HiW .PVMblP: fcHIHiiH&taMb " n-ama-iMi!-TM jm.-iMmmMi miiiii iBfrftMtmmmm J SIX HUNDRED GUESTS ON RIVER VIEW TRIP Food, Refreshments, and Amusements All Given Free to Big Crowd. "We will leave this rain behLV us at Alexandria." Committeeman Schulx, or the employes of the navy yard, the hosts of 600 children and -work-weary mothers on their way to River View for a day's suting yesterday, was rfijht. Through a rift In the leaden clouds that lowered over the Potomac yesterday, the sun peeped down on a boat lad of little tots and blgrger tots and anxious-faced women with babies In their arms, all of them looking skyward and hoping for a sign that their aay 0r promised happiness would not be marred by rain. Here was one day .In their lives that was to be made bright by the unsparing hospitality of men whoso daily bread is earned In the sweat of their brow. "This will never do," Old Sol must have said as he looked on the downcast faces of the St. John's passengers. "There are gloomy days enough In their lives. No matter how much the country may need this rain, J am going $o get busy and chaso these clouds away until these people have had their fill of happiness and are back and safely in their homes again." Skies Are Cleared. Slowly the sun burned his way through the cloud banks that sullenly retreated before, and as the St. John's churned her way past historic Alexan dria, he shed the full glory of his rays over the waters, thereby proving Committeeman Sehulz a weather sharp of no mean attainment "Hurrah!" yelled the youngsters In a lustry chorus. The women laughed in a sort of nervous way as the tension of their forebodings was broken. The committeemen of the Navy Yard workmen patted Shulz on the back. Old Sol looked at the scowling Plu-vius and winked at his discomfiture. "You can do as you like any time after tonight," said the sun to the god of rain. "I am going to be boss of the weather today and those kids and those hard-working mohers down there on the water are going to have the time of their lives. So you might Just as well take that sprinkling can you havo in your hand and put it away until after 6 o'clock." And what Old Sol said prevailed. Had Great Time. Did they have the time of their lives? If you would know the full meaning of the luxury -of doing good, you s'hould have seen them, Mr. or Mrs Reader. There arc those who would call the outing "a charity." Not bo the working men of Uncle Sam's navy yard. For ten years they have been opening wide their purse strings, not as almoners in the misunderstood name of charity, but because of good nature and brotherly love for their less fortunate fellows. When the boat tied up at the River View wharf one little fellow In his exuberant desire to be the first on shore, came near walking into the Potomac. He was caught In time by one of the commlttmen and instead of being scolded for his ill-judged display of Juvenile spirit, he was given a bag of peanuts and sent scampering up the steep banked walk to the gTove. Good Things to Eat For an hour while the committee In charge of the outing worked like the proverbial beaver to unload the great quantities of good things that had been lavishly provided against the remotest possibility of hunger with their guests, the children abandoned themselves to the fullest en joyment of the flying horses, the ponies or flesh and blood, and the miniature steam railroad. Every one of the 600 guests had been provided with a bunch of tickets of ar- Boneo colors, ana eacn color represented some form of amusement which the holder might Indulge in once. But whoever saw such an army of little people, all of whom would be content with Just one Indulgence In Ice cream and cake or riding a real pony for the first time In life or any other Joy-giving thing. There were repeaters. The committee had expected there would be. and had arranged accordingly. The commissary department, which Included every member o," the committee, established headquarters in a pavilion In the center of the grove. Tubs of lpmonade were prepared. A formidable line of Ice cream freezers was arranged for convenience In handing out the generous sized bricks of frozen sweetness. Six hundred pasteboard boxes, each containing a bounteous lunch were piled on tables. Box after box of oranges and plums and apricots were opened. Bags of peanuts, not the 5-cent size vou get from Lulgl of the traveling roaster but the 10-oent size, were put where the kids and the women folk could get at them lad libitum. Big Feature of Day. The big feature of tho day was the program of sports which was In charge of committeemen B. C. ladd, W, N. Huttel, W. F. Rucker, and James W. Booze. There were races for little boys and their older and bigger brothers. Also there were races for both the big and little girls. A tug-oNwar between teams composed of boys and teams composed of girls, a race for mothers, a needle-threading contest for Kir's not over fourteen, were Interesting. Last of all. the committeemen had a race of their own whlch-was won bv James E. Crown, with Joseph Sehulz and William E. Moody crowding him at the finishing tape H'fflV T. . - li. j -r.' ,rj i " A . ' - -J .'.--'j.. :.i - ." .- . 1W mimmmmmmmmmmmm'mmmK szite&izztt The prize winners were allowed to cany extra buckets of water from the pump to the pavilion when a new sunply of lemonade was needed. Only once, while the athletic events were being held, was there any expression of dissatisfaction In the ranks of the contestants. One little girl, in a running race, who finished a. close faec-ond, when told there was only one prize, said: un, snucks! well, I'll get a prize yet!" And eleven-year-old Pearl Hack-ley did win a prize when, in the pea nut garnering race, she picked up ror-ty-four peanuts scattered over the ground, in one minute. Everything had gone as smoothly as an untroubled sea to the committee on athletics until the needle-threading contest was announced. Twenty little girls were entered, each with feminine determination to outdistance her sisters in woman's best accomplishment The four misguided men who had undertaken to pass Judgment on the female ability to thread a needle In the most expeditious manner, surrendered to a chorus of protests and escaped the danger of saddening some little girl's day by announcing that all were prize winners and gave each of them a handkerchief Various Prize Winners. The winners and prizes in the various races follow: Francis Colbert, tan shoes; Nellie Davidson, tan shoes; Pearl Hackley, Etocklngs; Louise Pressler and Elizabeth Sullivan, a hair ribbon each; Hazel Gordon, shoes; Bessie Hardy, Elsie Burrows, and Louise Pressler, stockings; Marie Johnson, linen goods; Ken neth Gordon, box of handkerchiefs; Ernest Martin, stockings. John Dris-coll, umbrella; John Kline, shoos: George Hlmmelrlght, shoes: Willie Martin, umbrella; May Qulnn, umbrella; Thomas Luckett, stockings; Rossor Nails and Earl Richardson, stockings. Tho winning team in the boyV tug-of-war was composed of Jake Paragon, Willie Engle, Elmer Stewart Eugene Patrone, Robert Stewart, Franklin Burgess, Flovd Herndon, Jlmmle Donovan, Louis Felker, Johnnie Gavin, Tommy Gavin, Johnnie McClellan, Joseph Donovan, and Charlie Clementson. In the tug-of-war between girls, the winners were Annlo Werdlg, Mary Werdlg, Bessie Hardy, Ethel Gordon, Rose Rosenthal, Elsie Burrows. Mamie Vox, Ciie Frissell, Myra Stewart, Marie Johnson, Mary Sullivan. Lillian Panholzcr. Goldlc Paregol, Agnes Snell-lngs, Agnes Shaw, and Mary Walker. Mrs. Bessie Rlchnrdgon won the race for the married and single women and carried home a shirt waist pattern. Mrs. Ethel Barbee won a handsome gold-handled umbrella for winning first In the mothers' race. Alter the races there Tias a concerted rush for the pavilion where the eajablc yelling youngsters all anxious to get at tno good things. "Mister! Oh. mister! Gimme somo lemonade." "Gimme some peanuts " "1 want some ice cri." "Eh, mister, gimme some more lemonade and banana." Wants Are Satisfied. The wants of every boy and girl and grown-up were generously satisfied. and when the day was ended the COO guests or the navy yard men had accomplished tho annihilation or fifty gallons of ice cream, 100 dozen rolls, 2,400 cakes, 125 pounds of ham, firtecn pounds of butter, 100 pounds of sugar, 1.500 lemons, fifteen bunches of bananas, ten cases of plums, three cases apricots, four boxes oranges, and twenty bushels of peanuts. Each or them was provided with an individual drinking cup, a spoon and wooden plate. It was a tired but happy crowd or youngsters and mothers that returned to the city In the evening. But the passing or the Alexandria ferryboat or a group of peoplo on shore was the signal for hearty cheers. When the St. Johns tied up at her dock at 6 o'clock there were cheers for the navy yard men and the members of the committee. Mothers and children crowded about them with expressions or thanks for the enjoyment the day had brought to them. The rollowlng composed the committee. William E. Moody, chairman; Harry Meyer, vice chairman; J Walter Edelln. secretary; S. D. Cole, treasurer, and James W. Booze, James E Crown, F. A. DeGtoot, William Disney, Mr. Eckhar, Byron Gllmore. George H. Grif-fith, C. B Hobbard. W. N. Huttel H. W. Johnson. Daniel Jones, C. Kiel, B G. Ladd, C. A. Meer. Harry N. Reynols, W. F. Rucker, F. A. Ruff, Samuel R. Shrceve, Joseph Sehulz W. E. Thomson, Fred A. Trydell, Mr. Um-berger, J. W. Williams, and J. H. Wyatt. 'Lc-r,;xy-3':i -.Arie 1. T , .24 8ffl'1tMSi'ri :. J-.j i vst &WsJ, : i' ..: .!& r --' li'v.-' .'. i-''. S .4 . '-?,inv :&;- &&& 3S.-KJ4 .vx x:Ki-$(i.r&f' . 'ATi ' feOSZPCTS fim?fr?rt's :A-:iZiim :ymzv , 'i '; ;y -,j-f " rrf?-? m!l1kfXf;LM7'!9'nr J Brown Largest Woman Arrested Here Anna Brown Is one of the largest women every photographed and measured at Police Headquarters in this city, according to Fied Sanberg, official photographer of the department. She was arrcs'ed last night by Policeman Howes, of the First precinct, on a charge of grand larceny, it being alleged that she lemoved a couple of J100 bills from a roll belonging to George Kendricks, or 1001 Fourth street southeast. The woman was brought to head- rtngrfArfl thla mnrnlnp And nhntnpranh- wcre stacked, and roon the men of the ed She stands nearly six reet and tips nay yard were besieged by a mob or the scales close to 2j0 pounds. Nebraskans Holding Picnic at River View Nebraskans are spending tho day at River View. The occasion is a baskot picnic given by members or the Na-braska State Association. Numbered among the excursionists are many or the Nebraska Representatives, including Senators Hitchcock and Brown, Representatives Charles H. Sloan. James P. Latta, John A. Maguire, George W. Norris, Moses Kinkaid. Charles O. Lobeck, and Solicitor of the Treasury W. N. Thompson. A pro gram of athletic events has been arranged. This evening the excursionists will be taken for a forty mile ride down tho Potomac, returning to Washington about midnight, Roy A. Summers Freed Of Charge in Danville The Danville, Va., authorities today telephoned the Washington police to release Roy A. Summers, arrested yesterday at their request. According to a circular snt out by the Danville police. Summers was wanted on a charge growing out of the alleged theft of a diamond stud. The message this morning stated that the charge had been dismissed, the Danville authorities being convinced that Summers was in no way involved in the matter. Italian Diplomats Not Involved in Frauds that two Italian diplomats, at Washington, are Involved the alleged custom frauds for which Varola, of New York, ts under In that city. Is held ridiculous Varola, so far as known, has been In Washington. Varola, who acted as agent for an firm collecting parcel post for the Italian government. Is of having- made charges when charges were due and. with pocketing the proceeds. None of the members of tho Italian is in the city. Tho ambassador sailed for Europe June 30, and thejsecre-tarles are at Manchester, Mass., for the The acting Italian consul. E. said today that the charge tt that Italian diplomats stationed are connected with Varola. Maine for St. Ann Will Begin Monday A Novena in honor of St. Ann will next Monday evening at 7:30 in St. Ann's Catholic Church, Every evening there will a short period of Instruction by the the Rev. Father Smyth. Special and the benediction of the sacrament will follow. The Novena prayers also will be arter the 8 o'clock mass eac The Novena ceremonies will close on July 26, the date of the of St. Ann. s Washington's TODAY OR SUNDAY New 8-Room Homes 321 to 329 10th Street N.E. Corner 10th and D Sts. N. E. Only 3 Left A .EBBBSP Hb f TJ"!l' T BBBBBBBB BBBBB?''?' 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Clipped from
  1. The Washington Times,
  2. 15 Jul 1911, Sat,
  3. Page 3

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