Green River Killer

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Green River Killer 
 - 7 bodies found; serial killer back? PORTLAND,...
7 bodies found; serial killer back? PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The discovery of the bodies of seven young women on a remote hillside has fueled speculation that the Pacific Northwest's elusive Green River killer has struck again. But despite obvious similarities to the nation's worst recognized serial killings, no direct link has been established between the cases. "There are some findings on the bodies that are dissimilar to those of the Green River bodies," said Karen Gunson, deputy state medical examiner. "There are different injuries that we can see." she added without elaboration. A bow hunter discovered the first of the seven bodies Aug. 31 in dense brush on a private timber farm about 30 miles south of Portland in Clackamas County. Investigators found the six others during the next week. Five corpses were close together and the others were found a quarter of a mile away. Autopsies confirmed that at least six of the women died violently, authorities said, but the causes of death and nature of the slayings have not been revealed. The bodies were those of women estimated to be in their late teens to early 30s. Lisa Marie Mock, 23, of Berkeley, Calif., was confirmed as a victim through ; . dental records, said Deputy Russ Williams. Mrs. Mock moved to Portland last year and Multnomah County court records showed she was cited June 19 for solicitation for prostitution but failed to appear in court July 31 to answer to the accusation. The Green River killer preyed :.<m you;ig women, mar>y of them Seattle-area prostituiss, and dumped their bouics near one another in remote areas. The killer is blamed for the deaths of as many as 46 women between 1982 and early 1984. The killer operated primarily in Washington's Puget Sound area, but two of his victims were found in June 1985 near Tualatin, 20 miles northwest of where the seven bodies were found last week. The murderer was named after a King County, Wash., river where some of his first victims were discovered. A possible connection between the Green River and Oregon killings hasn't been ruled out, said Clackamas County sheriffs Capt. Lloyd Ryan. It's too early to tell whether the differences in injuries in the two cases are significant, said police Lt. Dan Nolan, deputy commander of the Green River Task Force. He said it's not unheard of for a serial killer to vary his method of operation. Investigators also haven't ruled out the possibility that the Oregon killer may be trying to imitate the Green River killer, Nolan said. "Anytime you have a number of people killed, and it becomes reported, and there are no arrests, it's very likely you're going' to have a copycat," Nolan said. 1 A man wanted in connection with two Washington homicides and one in Idaho has been discussed among authorities investigating the Oregon bodies, Williams said, but added "I don't think they (investigators) are focusing on any one suspect." FBI Special Agent Peter Wong A Clackamas County deputy sheriff stands guard over an area southwest of Molalla, Ore., where bodies of seven women were found recently. The discovery of the bodies has led to speculation that the Pacific Northwest's infamous Green River killer has struck again. (AP Laserphoto) gators collected thousands of piec- of the agency's Portland bureau also discounted the chances that the man was involved in the Oregon case. The Clackamas County sheriffs office has formed a special investigative team, the Molalla Forest Task Force. The bodies were found 10 miles southeast of Molalla, a town of 3,200 residents. A search of the area around the bodies was concluded after investi- es of material at the scene. The evidence was to be photographed and catalogued before being taken to the State Police crime laboratory here. Investigators now face the task of identifying the bodies. "Several suspect names have come up and several potential names of victims," Ryan said. Ms. Gunson said authorities were trying to match the victims to police missing persons lists, but also were hoping for tips from the public. "Identifying the bodies is a matter of time, of waiting, and we may never identify some of the bodies " she said. "There are millions of dental records out there. Every police department has a missing persons list. We really need the public's help."

Clipped from
  1. Indiana Gazette,
  2. 14 Dec 2004, Tue,
  3. Page 4

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