River Cleanup 71

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River Cleanup 71 - 1»AO§ TWENTY HAMILTON. OHIO, JOURNAL — THE...
1»AO§ TWENTY HAMILTON. OHIO, JOURNAL — THE DAILY NEWS WEDNESDAY, JUNE Here's Conservancy Report On River Cleanup _.. _ . . ...^ . .. _ , „ »»_„.,j_- s ~j >.:.» *»_«i»i...» t^.__*<, ».. tfc. <v* tt«*ftiM« to»»i«Mta4iMt tfnr ft*, nare. and monitor water quail A l<H>age "Environmental Impact Statement," outlining the goals Of the Miami Conservancy District in cleaning up the Great Miami River, as well as the "positive" and "negative" aspects of the alternative measures considered, was given to eafch person attending the recent public meeting at Mosler Hall, Hamilton Campus, Miami University. The meeting was arranged by the Hamilton - Fairfield League of Women Voters to permit the MOD to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. The Environmental Impact Statement is as follows: The regional plan for enhancement and protection of the waters of the Great Miami River Basin eventually to be adopted by The Miami Conservancy District will be designed to meet the requirements of "Four Freedoms" as set forth 'below: Minimum Conditions Applicable To All Waters At All Places And At All Times 1. Free from substances attributable to municipal, industrial or other discharges, or agricultural practices that will settle to form putrescent or otherwise objectionable sludge deposits. 2. Free from floating debris, oil, scum and other floating materials attributable to municipal, industrial or other discharges, or agricultural practices in amounts sufficient to be unsightly or deleterious. 3. Free from materials attributable to municipal, industrial or otiher discharges, or agricultural practices producing color, odor or other conditions in such degree as to create a nuisance. 4. Free from substances attributable to industrial or other discharges, or agricultural practices in con- centratons or combinations which are toxic or harmful to human, animal, plant or aquatic life, The related water Quality standards as set by the Ohio Water Pollution Control Board for the Great Miami River will also be met toy The Miami Conservancy District's recommended regional plan. The plan elements being considered for inclusion in the final regional plan and their respective impacts on the environment both positive and negative, other than meeting the afoove water quality standards. 1. Wastewater Treatment To The Degree Necessary TO Meet Water Quality Standards Including Advanced Waste Treatment Positive Impacts on the Environment A. Provides for possible reuse of water. B. Provides for increased productivity of land (certain methods). Negative Impacts on the Environment A. Requires modest to large amounts of land depending on method. B. Some methods produce concentrated liquid residuals for which long-term effects of disposal methods have not been evaluated. General Comments On Various Methods Of Advanced Treatment The environmental impact of advanced waste treatment processes is primarily related to land use requirements and to the ultimate disposal of solids and/or highly concentrated solutions or suspensions of solids. Chemical flocculation and sedimentation, rapid sand filtration and carbon absorption may be used singly or in combination to accomplish in excess of 90 per cent removal of polluting constituents in wastewater. They would be similar in size to present, day water treatment plants. Micro-strain' ing is a method of removing suspended solids which are left in final effluents from waste treatment plants. The process requires very little land area and may .be beneficial and applicable as a supplement to secondary treatment in many locations 1 . Environmental impact of the foregoing processes are related to the ultimate disposal of solids and to the consumption of chemicals. Solids disposal is discussed in a following paragraph. The consumption of chemicals can be significantly reduced by recovery and reuse. remaining for ultimate disposal. Jn summary, it may be said that advanced waste treatment offers the possibility' of some environmental enhancement beyond that created by meeting the water quality standards; and, if methods are chosen with proper respect for local conditions, there aife no environmental hazards which cannot be offset by proper dt- Electrodiaiysis, demineral-,si«ft and operation, ization and,reverse osmosis! 2 Regional Wastewater Treat- produce concentrated liquid ment Plants. wastes, the ultimate disposal Positive Impacts on the Enof which can produce serious' problems. In this area, deep well injection might 'be the only reasonable method of disposal. Lagooning requires large amounts of land, but if operations are properly controlled, the lagoons may actually offer recreational benefits. Spray irrigation is essentially a Warin weather operation which requires large amounts of real estate. Other methods of irrigation may be used. Agricultural crops may be grown on the land concurrent with waste disposal. This is basically an "ultimate" method of disposal, returning the wastes to the soil for reuse in growing plant tissue. It encounters special problems in winter weather. , vironment A. Elimination of numerous "outfalls" to the riven B. Can effectively prevent degradation of Water quality of tributaries. C. Centralized control and management of waste materials. D. Potential to use less land area in regional plants versus many small scattered plants. Negative Impacts on the Environment A. Possible elimination of some sewage treatment plant effluents whose flow regime is important to a stream. B. Concentrating a large load at one point along a watercourse, hence increasing danger of a localized toxic condition if not properly managed. Many advance^ waste treat- j c. Needs more land space in ment processes increase the total ; solids disposal problem. It is no different than the dis- C. Provides increased biological habitat by virtue of .increased water volume. D. Stream can be a more reliable and continuing source 6f water supply. Negative Impacts on the Environment A. Depends upon methods employed as shown in Items 3a, b, c and d on the following: Note: Under the present schedule of corrective measures of the Ohio Water Pollution Control Board, low-flow augmentation is a requirement for meeting' Water Quality Standards in the Great Miami River. 3a. Low-Flow Augmentation By On-Stream Reserynlr(s) Positive Impacts on the Environment A. Reduces seasonal hazards due to malfunctions of wastewater treatment plants, accidental spills, etc, B. Can provide a more aesthetically pleasing river. C. Provides increased biological habitat by virtue of increased water volume. D. Stream can be a more reliable and continuing source of water supply. E. Potential multipurpose environmental benefits include: a) Wildlife habitat b) Water supply c) Flood control, and d) Recreation. Negative Impacts on the Environment A. Removal of large land posal problem resulting from The following items, fewer areas, thereby possibly concentrating aesthetically un- areas f rom O ther productive pleasing effects. secondary treatment, but the amoiint of solids to be disposed of is Significantly increased. Disposal on land as a soil conditioner is desirable where waste materials are compatible with the soil, and generally beneficial to agricultural uses. Lagooning of wet sludge has the potential to create nuisance conditions, and may pose some hazard to groundwater quality jf locations are not carefully chosen. Incineration requires elaborate air 'pollution control! uses. 3 B. Removal of river wildlife through 8, must be worked in habitat and recreational areas. combination Ohio Water with the Pollution present Control Board schedule of corrective measures, which requires secondary treatment throughout the region. C. Displacement of residents 3. Low-Flow Augmentation valley. in area. D. Effects on aesthetics: a) Unsightly mud flats during drawdown, and b) Appearance of a dam versus an open river Positive Impacts on the Environment A. Reduces seasonal hazards due to 'malfunctions of wastewater treatment plants, accidental spills, etc. E. Reservoirs become nutrient traps with the effect of long-term uncontrolled growths of aquatic organisms such as algae and other vegetation. 3b. Low-Flow Augmentation devices and there is still ash tically pleasing river. B. Can provide a more aesthe- By Off-Stream, Upland Pump| ed-Storage Reservoir(s) TIRE GENERAL TIRE PRE-4 th OF JULY * '* 4-PLY NYLON CORD Positive Impacts on tfte'En vfronment A. Reduces seasonal hazards due to malfunctions of tfaste- water treatment plants, acci* dental spills, etc. B. Can -provide a more aesthetically pleasing river/ C. Provides increa&d biological habitat .by virtue 6t increased water volume. D. Stream can be a niofe re liable and continuing source dl water supply. E. Potential multipurpose environmental benefits include: a) Wildlife habitat b) Water supply c) Flood control, and d) Recreation, F. Potential use as a sourctf of peak electric power. 0. Opportunity for some degree of selectivity as to quality of storage water. Negative Impacts on -'• the Environment A. Removal of large land areas uses. from other productive . B. Removal of v upland wildlife habitat and recreational areas. C. Displacement of residents in area. , • ' ._ D, Unsightly mud flats during drawdown. E. Reservoirs become nutri ent traps with the effect ol long-term uncontrolled growths of aquatic organisms such as algae and other vegetation. 3c. Low-Plow Augmentation By Groundwater Pumping ' Positive Impacts on the Environment A. Reduces seasonal hazards due to malfunctions of waste water treatment plants, acci dental spills, etc. B. Can -provide a more aes thetically pleasing river. . C. Provides increased biological habitat by virtue of in creased water volume. D. Stream can ; be a more re liable,and continuing source o water'supply. E. Little -. effect on surface environment in taking lands out of productive uses. F. May be quickly and easily discontinued without environ mental disruption if use should become unnecessary. Negative Impacts on the Environment A. I ric r e a s e s possibility of groundwater contamination from recharge. B. Localized temporary low ering of water table. (Affected groundwater users would r be supplied sources.) from augmentation C. May dry up small surface tributaries. Low-Flow Augmentation By Recirculatlon Of River Water From Downstream To Upstream Points ; positive Impacts 'on the Environment A. Reduces seasonal hazards due to malfunctions of waste water treatment plants, acci dental spills, etc. B. Can provide a more aes thetically pleasing river. C. Provides 'increased biological habitat by virtue of in creased water volume. D. Stream can be a more re liable and continuing source o water supply. C. Little effect on environment (except surface durinj land! construction) in taking out of productive uses. F. May be quickly and easily discontinued without environ mental disruption if use should become unnecessary. Negative Impacts on the Environment A. Disruption of local flora etc., during construction.; B. Distribution of lower basin solids and basin. nutrients, to upper • Dual Tread Design BDuragen* Rubber Treat) SIZE 7.75-14 & 7.75-15 ........ 4 I Of ID SIZE 8.25-14 & 8.25-15 ........ 4 I Of OO SIZE 8.55-14.... ............. 4lOr DD Tubelesa whitewall pricea, plus $1 .76 Jo $2,50 Fed. Ex. Tax per tire depending on size. FREE MOUNTING ... NO TRADE NEEDED... SALE ENDS JULY 3 RAIN CHECK . . . Should our supply of torn* llr* tiiti or lintt run »hort during thl* •v*nl, »• will honor any orders placed now lor lutun dollwry M in* •dv*rtlitd price. SIZE 6.50-13 <cw. ' -k •&* *** Move Out On General's Widest Calibrated* Tire POLYESTER CORD-GLASS BELTED General's 60 serits tire with bold raised white-latter sidawall da- aign. White-Una .and white-letter 70 aariaa aleo available to (It moat popular care. *"********"**** ** ****** ** ** ** VACATION SPECIAL FRONT INP AUONMIWT AWHIILsUUNCf plua 2 NEW SHOCK W« correct c«mb«r, MsMr, l««-in, lot-out 'if, balance both front p*i««lt (statically- U-HJi. M- EMERGENCY KIT A muot (or car, boat, truck or trailer Incluoti /.. Jumper CaplM, Oify aea.aa.ae (HAL 'inslsii I .n«» D«ico PICMurlftr Stock Absorbers. Cut wiM tlr pondiilonliH) <nd/or lodlon k«r» •*•> «il'S. ~k ic *k ** *** ** *** ***** ** ** *** * * * *'>Sr *^ * ^%« .• . /^ i •*» (^B^**^! /-r^£sflsQ ^BB^s^A *ric»4 si sHo»rfl «t General Tire storei' Charge it at Caenerai Tire*.. MMmMLMiBBS GWM*** v«« at ine,p.n«*.r« 0 »^W»\\»^»^fc^fc^ «»»«!—•I aeelws displsying the Ocnersl ti(n. STOMIHOUN8 GENERAL TIRE SERVICE 2220 SOUTH IMI • PHONt it*2t!! E QINIMAl Tim,,. OOH A LOWO WAV TO MAKI PHIIMDi*! I a.m. -1 p M* M Note: This alternative is no proven but is being investigat ed. 4. Instream Aeration By Surface, Aerators Or Injection Of Pure Oxygen, •;.-.-, Positive Impct on the En vironment . A. May be quickly and easily discontinued without environmental disruption if use shouW become Unnecessary, Negative impacts on the Environment A. Surface aerators may interfere with recreational us'es of the river infarea of placement. ,.. >':' B. May release strewn-bot torn sludges with eventual tern poraty degrading downstream effects. »; • , r ' -' i. gaoling Towers For Removing Thtrmel Load* From The River Positive Impacts on the Environment A. Cap be aesthetically pl?e> ing tf properly placed, v lative Impacts on the En- A. focalized microclimetic effects such as fogging, icing and increased humidity. B. Can be aesthetically un- plea$ing if improfpjrly placed;, Note; Curren| indications are that cooling tower* W meet rVater Quality Standards my le an "ejsenUal" rather than an alternate, if adequate low are not provided. - lala latafcoptofta) Fatal* „.„•. IV IHver 'ft^C-a f r V Wastewaters To (Maliiwl Locutions For Treatment Anil Po*slMe Reclamation For Re rise ; • Positive Inipacts on the Environment A. Elimination of numerous "outfalls" to the river. B. Can effectively prevent degradation of water quality of tributaries. C. Centralized control- and of waste mater- D. Po)«rttial to use less land area in' regional plants versus many small scattered plants. E. Potential to locate wastewater reclamation plants along interceptor to create a supply of reclaimed Water for reuse, ^Negative Impacts on the Environment, '*-,.. , A. Possible elimination of some sfewage treatment plant effluents whose flow regime is important to a stream. B. Concentrating a large load at one point along a watercourse, hence increasing danger of a localized toijC condition if not properly managed. C. Needs more land space in fewer areas 'thereby possibly concentrating aesthetically unpleasing effects'. D. Stream flows above the discharge would be reduced, thereby reducing aesthetics and aquatic life habitat. 7. Treated Wastewater Storage With Programmed Releases, This Is The Reverse Of Low-Flow Augmentation; Treated Wastewater Discharges Would Be Metered In Relation To Available Stream Flow Positive Impacts on the Environment A. Provides opportunity for additional Wastewater treatment during the storage period. Negative Impacts on the Environment A. Requires large land areas for storage. B. Stored Wastewater can produce nuisance and-or toxic conditions if not carefully controlled' and regulated. 8. Combinations Of The Above Elements , The District will, in completing the final regional plan to be presented in public meetings later this year, fully and completely evaluate all of the alternatives 'herein presented. Following analysis of the public comments received as a result of this series of meetings, the District will recommend the final regional plan which will meet bhe water quality standards and the "Four Freedoms." In addition to the above, the following two items will be proposed as a part of The Miami Conservancy District; recommended Regional Plan. 9. Stream Appearance Program All of the .previous methods must be worked in consort with the current stream appearance program of ,the District. The removal of litter and solid waste from the stream, emanating from the general public, must be continued to in e e t Item 2 of ithe "Four Freedoms". ' 10. Preservation Of Small Tributary Streams, Stream Sectors, And Natural To Semi- Natural Corridors,By Purchase Of Floo&plain Land Or Coop, eratlve Easement* Positive Impacts on the Environment A. Meets water quality standards 4n local areas by virtue of, preventing any discharge of waste effluents -into such streams or stream sectors, with the exception of natural and some agricultural runoff., B. Provides as natural as possible a' running water ecosys tern by wliich to check, com- pare, and monitor ty and aquatic life changes due lo natural and semi-natural environmental factors. C Provides "natural aquatic communities ifor education and research 'activities. D. Prevents degradation of currently viable streams and stream sectors that are presently above the State Water Quality Standards. E. Helps in preventing urban sprawl and growth, particularly along streams of low assimilative capacity. F. Can be utilized for passive recreation, particularly suitable for swimming, fishing, nature study, hiking, etc. Negative Impacts on the Environment A. Prevents urban growth. B. Reduces agricultural and livestock use of certain streams and stream sectors. C. Reduces number of sites for waste treatment facilities. B. Economic Aspects Of Alternatives No specific set or sets of alternatives for economic comparison may .foe considered final at this time. The object of the District in developing the water quality plan is to finally present that program which achieves the water quality standards With greatest public acceptance, ".. cost • considered. The final plan will incorporate various combinations of the several plan elements. ' t The general range lj bl costs can be developed by comparing certain hypothetical situations. The table that follows compares low-flow augmentation with advanced waste treatment-. The range of costs for low-flow augmentation covers different methods of flow augmentation, the minimum being by groundwater pumping and the maximum by storage reservoirs. The range of costs for advanced waste treatment covers different degrees of treatment and differences of opinion by estimators which Cannot be resolved without detailed study of individual cases. Possible reduction by state or federal aid is not taken into account;' but,"Will be included, insofar as possible, in the final plan. Capital costs are spread over 30 years at six per cent interest. Cooling towers may be required at major power installations and the estimated cost is also shown since it is a cost which would eventually be borne by the consumer.' Cost Comparison — Alternate Methods, Water Quality Control, Great Miami River Basin The proposed cost of three separate methods of cleaning up- the Great Miami River — which are listed for a compari- son'basis — are as follows: Low-flow augmentation and instream aeration combined would cost between $8,400,000 and $100 million. The minimum figure would result in an .annual cost of $3-30 for ' each household in the valley and the maximum figure; would result in an annual cost of $25.30. Advanced waste treatment would cost a maximum of $150 million and a minimum'of $19 million. The minimum cost would result in ah annual cost to each household of $9*90 and the maximum would 'result in an annual cost of $7». The use of cooling towers for power plants would cost $HMt million and result in an annual cost of $3.90 to each household in the Valley. The above costs are in addition to the cost presently in effect in the region and in addi- Ition to those anticipated for total secondary treatment in the region. MIRROR OF YOUR MIND by JOHN CONWIll , „ , What's th. minimum «|e far mean, behavler . Aiwwwri About 21, or when an adult sUrU to act mean for the Mke of being mean, Anyone youngerJtfww that is acUnV in rapojM* to btlng ignorsd or mistreated. aomea4ulU,whtf should know bstter, will call a toddler "mean-nat«red,» evtn thouirh the little thing i* simply rejwtuif to frustration —'- • AM J i« ' AM|M 4^M•!••«* t£ A^ll ._..»_.u.._ u ... It* Juafr * ~ 0aae • vein person attract Jiny frlamlit , , Auwfr; H 9 nmy attract Deoflo^ Ww, but they rawly stick MUBd Ion* fcnnuvh tn ViA«nm. frtmnAh^t. ual. ..1.1*^?.^.'. * m ivothlni VMiul can •rouad Jon* enough to Ucome frtendiA «* fir* tafirMad in others, and th^will r AjtUW ,|TiH, wlwa it kMcomw dear feat the jnojff taut th? meam to (fcUrmin* ho\Mht V*i» m»ke oUw* *«• how wonderful h» U, the friM**ips will wither »w»y. y ; , :. Is IP Widow wioe to I*** tit htf trtwn ' AMMM i Wall, «jhe should at |*ait talk tWngf over wUh them if they an willing to livUn, Too many timti, though, a« mtoTft wMew know, to tier regret, her gtw« f)ift<WWW IMV* her ftrtotly on her own after she lose* h*r ftuaban*. in a move to kej»p from "spoiling" )l«r, they will manage to withdraw their moral support «t the moment when *he would gain strength from any encouragement that comes her way after her great toftf,

Clipped from
  1. The Journal News,
  2. 30 Jun 1971, Wed,
  3. Page 91

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