Martial Law in Atlanta

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Martial Law in Atlanta - a Is of It the Into the o ha new keys us tol an...
a Is of It the Into the o ha new keys us tol an wh ha from de t pu bar cap- boy- deta Us HOW MARTIAL LAW WORKED IN ATLANTA. The fl war had been In progress for more than a. year before Atlanta wa made maitary post. This wa dona Jn June lS6t and Major A. Bjrden was mad the commanding- officer In August martial law was declared by eneral Bragg anfljamon the provost mar- shale- at differeat times were G J Fore- era and O. "Vv" Lee. two gallant confeder- te officer who died/year ago. When Crag declared martial law the on. James M. Calhoun was mayor of the ty. The genera appointed him civil gov- rnor Of Atlanta with ten alas the idea being th promotion of harmony between the civil and the military authorities. Until that time the writ of habeas corpus had remained In full force but-the arrest of Professor A. K. Wilson caused the writ to De suspended. Wfl m was one of ftemost popular choolteacher in the city and onanybf our aer resident were- among his pupils. He was highly esteemed as an upright tlzen and.a clever gentleman but he had that misfortune to be a unionist In princlpla nd In .sympathy. In those- exciting times a man who was ot for the confederacy twis supposed to be against It and If he expressed union eon- uments.hls neighbor made It hot for him. So the teacher was arrested for disloyalty nd locked up. "What are you going to do about itr asked an officer. "Send for my lawyer. replied Wilson and get out on. a writ of habeas corpus. The officer-rushed Off. and wfien Wilson's lawyer Malted the provost marshal' office o inquire into the matter he was delayed mil a telegram was received from Richmond announcing the suspension of -the writ of habeas corpus in Atlanta and for ve miles around the town. It la too long a story to tell here but Wilson was released In a short time and le embraced the first opportunity to move with his family Inside of the federal lines. A provost guard was organized and sometimes there were sentinels on every- street rner demanding- a pass from every able- bodied male citizen. Boys .who were rather all for their age had a hard time. The pro- ost marshal refused to give them passes saying that they were too young but the guards were nol always' satisfied with this explanation and arrested the youngsters. 'The sixteen-year-old boys In this town re the biggest to be found anywhere was a common remark among the soldiers The rules were very strict. Liquor -was not allowed to be sold tout It was to be had n the sly. No house was allowed to lodge a visitor rom another town unless h bad a pass which had to be sent to the provost marshal. Once here the" visitor would not leave without a pass. Every house owner had to make a report at 8 o'clock 'at night of his visitors or send in their passes. The. pass system was very troublesome Frequently young men were arrested .t the heater because they had forgotten their papers. If they had ladles with them they were allowed to escort them home but a guard walked with them. Altogether there were eleven hospitals lere. From first to last 75,000 sick and woundrd confederates were cared for within our gates. Immense quantities of medlqlnes were stored here but It was impossible to procure a sufficient supply of some drugs such' as quinine for instance and blockade run ners were offered great Inducements to bring them through the lines. At that time the city had no waterworks no paved streets no good system of sewers and no- scientific sanitary regulations. Sick soldiers were sent here from every quarter with all kinds of diseases. The eleven hospital were packed with sufferers and the mortality among- them would have been frightful. If it had not been for the unselfish and unstinted ef forts of the .ladies. Who did everything -that was possible to improve their/condition. Out of these hospitals dieeake and death marched forth to ravage th communlty. Smallpox became a frequent T tflr and malignant fevers entered many homes But Yellow Jack then as now.wa unable to gain a foothold In the Gate City Yellow fever patients were brought here but the disease did not spread. Mayor Calhoun did not fancy the position of civil governor and Vice President Stephens declared that he had no.authority to act under Brags' appointment. The Intelligencer opposed this view and said that the city needed a civil governor. Calhoun remained In office as mayo during the -war and formally surrendered the city to Sherman. After the federals came In there was another dose of martial law. The Wj generals quartered themselves In the best houses and the citizens were made to feel that they had no rights. Sherman ordered the residents to leave and transported thousands of them with some of their household goods to Hood' headquarters at Rough and Ready. Many went north and about fifty familial remained during the federal occupation o the city. Tnls was early In September. On the 15tl of November Sherman destroyed the town and started on his march to the sea. In and Immediately around Atlanta 4,500 houses were laid In ashes. A few churches the courthouse a medical college an ol hotel on Alabama street and about 0 houses were'epared. Between that time and the inoccupation of the "city by the federals there was trouble. The civil authorities could da nUUlng and il e soldiers under Colonel 4. i J Glenn the confederate comman-liag officer 1 not maintain order. -4fc Stragglers from the army helped them- .elves to mules and government stores claiming that they had as much rtgnt to them as anybody else. Early in May 1865. Colonel B. B. Eggles- ton. of the First Ohio cavalry took posses sion of the place and the citizens were glad to see him. Even the- rule o th enemy was better than the anarchy Into whlch'the ruined city was. drifting. Eggleston at once stopped the sale o liquor Then as he found that the idle negro tramps were firing trouble. he or aered the arrest of every black who could not show pass. Still there was no civil law.When cWien was oppressed or wrouged by .an of his neighbors he hadjto lay MS case before the military-'authorities. In June occurred thTfirst public meetln held after the surrender. Mayor Calhou presided and made a pie for the revival of public spirit good feeling and confi dence eaylng that he had never favored th destruction of the old union. A committee was appointed composed o John M. Clarke. Jared L Whltaker. A Austell. 3 I. Dnnwoody and George W Adalr. Resolutions were reported an adopted congratulating the people upon th return'of peace advocating the peed restoration of old relations s unelir obedience to the laws condemning th assassination Lincoln expressing confi deuce in President Johnson's admlnlrtra tlon. and Indorsing ProvtaloHal Gov rno James Johnson. Bat martial law did not end with th Atlanta -wax the headquarters of a mm tary -district fan several year after th close of hostilities and she had such corn- tnander 'Generate Pope- Meade 'and Terry. For yean federal soldiers many of them negroes fined our streets and even after the re of civil authority th court were hampered by the frequent In terference of the military. 'And yet our experience with martial la 'will In future be regarded a a' mere Mi when .compared 'with the harsh method will 1 accessary -Wea-o r ensi i undertake 'the difficult task of reitortne Order In Cuba Porto Rico and perhaps' la he Philippines. The wconsjructlorVrbf.'those countries un- er American Saycmets will be a -very un- ileasant chapter la our history It will Va long- time'after the'end of-Out "war with Spain before It.frtU be cafe to disband ur armies. WALLACE P RSEP.- How It Is Viewed Abroad. rom The Birmingham -Ala. Age The figures of the GeoTgiapriinarle ar astonishing and gratifying. The wide- wake state has taken a step in political regress that will certainly be demanded n other southern tate a step that has ong been sadly needed In all' states that ractllLlly have but one white man's party. The rule of tha.courthouse cliques U near- ' ended. A study of the Georgia figures shows at a glance their doom. In our sister state there were three aspirant for gOver- or two for secretary of state two for com. missioner of agriculture and three for pria- n commissioner. Heretofore such contest lave been decided none too.satisfactorily iy tha courthouse "fliers. averaging about wenty cchemlag Individuals to the county. The figures of last Monday primaries are not complete.- but a table IQ The Constitution shows for example that Cl.SU dtp en voted for Colonel Candler JS.J33 for Mr. .Berner and 13,61.4 for Judge Atkinson a total of , . When the fuUflgures are received It will doubtless appear that fully 00.000 citizens came out and expressed their choice for candidates. Compare.tha mas- nificeht expression with the customary clique.nominations of the pastl. and you have the cause of some at least of the bolt. and factions and dissensions and troubles of the eouth in-recent times. The re- suit In Georgia Is eminently Satisfactory and is accepted throughout the state and no. ticket can be put up by the populists or republican's that cam successfully stand" against it. The people have come to their own at last.It Is a case in-Georgia of a ticket made by 100,000 honest Citizens against a ticket licked shape by deals' and secret combinations among about 2,000 politicians under the discarded end thoroughly worn-out convention system Jtv.i plain that Georgia wants no more of th old ratezn. The Georgia state executive committee retains a semblance of the electoral college planned by the worthy but mistaken fath -era of the. constitution. The county live committees are required to appoint delegates .in. sympathy with the vote their res ectlve counties. 'These delegates meet to formally ratify the choice of the people and to frame a. platform. Neither Job Is at all necessary arid.will not probably be repeated thereafter. The tateiex- ecuUve "committee could Just as 'well tabulate and announce the vote Asa matter fact the papers of the'state print the ticket selected last .Monday in .that classic place to. their columns- known as the masthead and that settles .41 alt the convention does not meet until the lost week the present month. Bo'faf as a platform Is concerned none needed. Acts are better than Words. Platform promises are rarely kept. 'Let spar- ty stood or fall as It does In .England.of In any other country that has party government .by the acts and .records oMtijoffl- dais and especially-of of Its members of tb legislature If heed Toe the democraflo members "of .the- legislature fconld put a. platform. This would be'a return to the early practlcai of the country to'the me th odd of the pre and purer day of the repubHe. Sweptesif byCli&ff. From The -Lumpkln Ga Independent. A ground swell or a landslide a cyclone or what you please to call Ityeiir-ttac4 Allen D. Candler got there all th ame He swept the field a If there was only light chaff in his way. Nothing like itJa many years. supremely Happy ; From The Darien- Ga.j Gazette The Gazette is supremely .Iiappy the ylctory on Monday. And It ha nothing" In the world to say against. the good men who were defeated. iv. All for.Uncle Allen.ifowy From 'The Newnan. Ga. Herald and vertlser. A good many democrats took occas'qn to sass" your Uncle Allen at different' times .during .the .campaign which closed Monday night but now that tht.'real fight has opened we don't Intend fto-illow th populists to abuse him. Democratic/blood Is thicker than water. ODDS AND EKTDSl The phonograph 1 now used to teach for- sign languages. With each phonograph pupil receives a textbook and twenty loaded cylinder Each 1 in the tiook Is ar ranged In the form of -questions pd were. The pupil-ready to begin put cylinder pf the fifsr lesson In the machine the tube In hi ears an4 start the phone. graj The amount paidby th "United.State government'for pension In one'year would' be sufficient to pay all the o vernment pence of 'Mexico 61 every kind for years. A San Francisco newspaper make careful estimate of the wealth pf tat est reserves In Bavaria It.sayB that at a per cent Inters rate the net/ Income them make them worth (130,000,090 or an acre while the land without wood -would not be worth $10. These figure U make the base of an appeal for the care preservation American forest ibis 1 good -way to go to"-work to a good oauM. particularly in California where vandalism trees ha been rampant In the twenty-throe libraries of Berlin which -are either public "or belonging to official bodies there are over 2,000,000 volnmw The royal library contain over 1.000,000 volumes th university library 2 ,000 of the royal statistical bureau 135,000. war academy co U' cUon consists -of volumes that of the general staff of and that o the royal chancery 71690 volumes. M. Martel the well-known Preach hunter. ha explored a cave or natural in the llmotone of the Xoi6re France with remarkable' runUs After descending a vertical haft tot about y feet he an immense ha Q eloping downward nd the lower end forest of taUgmltee seraMlne pine and palm tree Many them are very beautiful and one ninety feet In height Teaches nearly to vault of the cavern. Nothing like this forest of tone ha beea observed In any known cave.or pit Deaths in Columbus 'Columbn Qa 'jane IS. Special G. W. OKletreej aged thtrty-nina years wife of Profeasor O. W Ogletree. died today at their hom north of the city a long illness. air Amanda Wyatt wife of Mr. 3. W4t died. ye t rday'and wailjuried e d,4Cr9. q' k' 1 rk i ae so t of ha 'new keY Ue ek .tl. .announce wbo has frm o pt cap hoa b f' IHOWM JJA LAW'r 'WqR. P 'T. cy'wa .b l proges or r n e btor.Uat& ae' nmtPt .c not .ue I Md IJorA Lydel.w.madete emmdgomcer. Aut marlaw 'wa delar b de err .on te 'prCst'mar- lhW. det tme wre G.1 yor aceand'c. 'W. 'L pt 'entde- .te'omc wh di "rr ag Wenir deae ma kw.the HOI.ae M Oo wa 'maYor cty. Te'geeral Pbed h v v- emo ofAtata wih" te athe'fe bnc' romoUo bano btween to dvldt mit autbr Unt r tatte tt olba Orus h r e i'ful fore butte arrst Polesl Wisol cuse wrJ t b susPne. Wl w O. 1t ppur Ichlecerin t e ciy danT tour older ldent 1s upll He. ws higy eteeme a l.uprlht ctz n an4aceyer g nteman but'he tt mforue b a unlO1t prlcpie- and .ypt. I tose exct 6 w o not the. s eupJe b I 1 expreSse uo sn- tenthis nelh sad i b' 8'tbe teaher wa rreted dlloaty and loe "Wit a' gig at'lt" ake mcr. "S IW r fepUe Wl n "a gt ona wt 0 btu cr .Te om r' rshe l wnen' Wisn's Vlte prvot'm b1' om t Inqure Ito te mter. wudelle Unt te wareehe trmnic mnd alung slpello'n of -he wrt uerus Attt i fve mies. te toW I to lng sto 'tel Wilon wa r.ele &hor te be ebrc lrt oprtunity J0re wlt h1 ta1111 t Un pr grd ws orgned. .ome Ume therewerelntne1 everstret crer dmanding 8 'ps fm ever ale bied mie cten Joys.Wo w re rater tal a ba 8 bad tme. Te pr vost marhal rtsed gve te psses 6 to .u ards we stsfe wih ths explanaUon meste te.younter sxteenye ld by tltow are th bigest b foud yher cmn rmark aong eolder. Te rles ve strict Lquor 'wa &owe beold bt W t b1d on hOUBW s alow log8' vsior trm aote tow unes he h a p whc b b provo maf- sha Oce th viitor leve wihot pe Ever hOe ower had.t mae a rrt nightot hi visiors Ind.n teir psses. Th& pa ver Feuenty youg areste . theate bcaus theb forotten. papr. I lad wJh alowed. esor grd wae Wt them AtoetMr ther 're hospit here. Fom frst lat 7,0 sck 'ur cnfederates ced wihi ou Imens QU8tte medl es. her i wa Jmpslble pr cue soe drgs qull e Inst-nce adbiokade rn- oter get iducements brng tem thru tn. tIe ct bd nowaterwor pave streLno go sewer an no scienUc sa regtn' ilck solder sent'bere fm. ever qurter Wth'aU kind disee. Te eleve hopUjU pked wt sutere te mraiy an 'oul bn frghtu i b n t ben te unfsh uns e fors te lade wb e.e ng .tat posile their ndUO. Ot ospUas dsea deth marche forh t- ravage com nty. Blpxbae 6' feuent rand maliant fever enteed boeS .ut Yelo Jack a now. wa 'abt c fothold th Gae Cty Telow ptent we diaea di spred ay facy pslon e s er'un e b O' at Bragga appointmen Inte1gencer ope tbs ve Bi te nee a civl gvemQr. Chou rmed dur.ng te wr ad. f.oraly surendere Sherman feeras cae t re wa msal la. bs geners quatered themlves b t haes ad cUzen wer tat tey hd rihts. Sheran rde dthe rsdens transpore tousads tem Wth sme househol gos headqurer Rougl Reay. 'ny north.jnd abut ffy tmie remaie durrg feerocptonot tho dt Tnl wa ealy Sptmbr. 1 b Novembr Shran de oyed tOt stred h mach' leLIn tmeatel aound Atata 4f la 1 uha curhouse a eca col1 e old Abaa ad ahutf house were 'Ipare Betwen tb' tl a th "Occupaton 'cty feerathere a truble cVl authort coul ca. n.thng .nd soldier \thel J. Glcn te cqfeerte comm3'lag cer ca nt mnt orde. Stragle1 ay helpd tbe .to mues ad. Ioverem cng1bat "much' rg tt tem a anyby eLe. ErlY Y 1. 0lnel gle tn oftbe Frt Oho cva psses Ionof te plce ad .cUzenawee le hm Een the rle of" te enemys beter t anb71t whb -the1ne ctw dtng. Eksto nceBtopp. t saot Uq r. Ten. foun thatUe 14e negro tpwer.y tru le r dere te aest. ever bck ho Cul ebO ps. Sti tbr wa no cVllaw. When a cUzen waoppree w01e ba h1 neighb1 'badto iy b. cao' forete mUt. brUe -nJune cure te tt-publcm UI be' .afer. surn.er ayor ahoUJ preld ad Je& pie. 'firthe'rva 'of pbc eplrt god feUng an cnl denc eg eba ne aavr e .destctlon t 'o1 oon cmtte8 "a' aJlec iPSe 'of .ohn'1 rke .aM'L Wter. AUtel .L.1woyid erW d Reolun'wer repre ad a te natultg 'tep e upn. te riur f .pc avgtelpy. tert ol rtons uD 'obence' t t 1aa 4emnlg" .the Us1 CfUclexpsgcn denc"tn Pent 10l on'.at. t0 n4'i.1ofng. .PD 'Gerr ButFn lW 'clnofend.'th Je i- .f 'h Ure.o tr -te" Svert:7e ate i. t' e ne fe o. e ad ftr te. sent' fr .tJrty't c e. hp Jreqet. 'tmerUC tth.mt ou. 'expeneWtl/b ,1 rtur.t'Je re m rj ttt11i mpar ' ll1et , 11'1 Ube arr' e " dertake 'J dtifte 1t' t'r t i1llC Ohrd. er. n. .Po. r .Rl. 9.a..n.d. P .In. t e Philippi es. The. ru tio tthos erAmericaii 1onets. be& 'geryun- p .asant. 'haptertn. JtwU1o be ia. > ng' tlme'atter.1he.endof.our. war. wlthBpalnbetore besate.t d1Sba 1d our 1\ 'WALLAcgp. 'u laVle ed b Oa.d. FromTheB go efigures. G i&1a'Prlmarles' ar..and. BT 'i. h"'J1 has.takeQ aatepinpolltJcs1 lhatWUt eertalnIybe4e ndetl In southen.t&tes-a.ste . long n.a1 'etatesJbat yracttJatiT'bave ori man -party ne 11' A. studyot tbliGeorgIa1lguz o r.slster' w reth1" e UIilr lts vef' nor. fO eereiari of'ltate.twO - co f gricult\triani1'\t reeor'Prls. on con ta. have no byJhe "tlxers.'ll.vemitnCa.bout t twenty-scheming 'indivld Ia 'to.Uie ountn oflut pri.marles.are . nample.iL t Qm. dl- 'sen. for Ca .l935f r for'Jl.ldi t1rln. 94,652. Whm. th full el cue received W11140ubUeas t ll camtrout an4expreu ompare. the.D1Il Ithtb. .custo U7 tl1 ast. and'Ou have C. au.ae me at l as't. t- pi. e. d1ssens OIIlS 1 f the-south In'recenftlm 'rbe're- suIt t 1ri\,1gJ1out O'state aJd 'tlc etcan Jlutup by tha s &nd' h .veco o n laat It caso.tni.Georc4ta boned. t1z ns Uck d 'JntoahapebydeaIl Be ret among'abouti.OOOt under. 'is ard.ed .th r .mor ot'Uie. system. exec live'cotnm1tt theelecto l nege bilt' rs unty 1 r reqilire4 d egates ,1nsYmpathyWtth.thevoiOI re i t1ve -Thesede eg9.tes the'cholcesof the me. a'Plat oruL. Jielthei. Is'.at 11eeessar'yand'jrtUnotprob ther fter e. state. ex- e uUy 'comm tteeco 1d. s 'weutibu- arinounce As smatter' pape 'of'the'.tat printthetlck- ast1a1 DdaT th 1r olumnitkMwnaa.h masth theeonien- do untlltherutweek B far apla.tform collC med. than. arerar lykOpt. t."J1 r aalt does.n'En&'la 1d.or any''Other ul ry Party I'Qiem &Cta8.n4 co andespecla1iyot tth 'the' d J 1Ci riflo membji1'll' tthe'legblature'could' p Thiawo11 d 'b 'a tuh1 to.the pl' cUc CollDlI7..t tl1 inet - nvent1on 'purerd Swept as if. The' qa. : en j .weUor8olandsl1de a.jeYclon. 1t.Y t"Unc1. th r the ame ldaatt. 'there'w. cl1atrfu. maIlY I' SupreinelyRapP1 1. The. ueit ctory Itb .no th wc.rldtosay a atn m Jor UneleA11en.'ifOw T e eraIdan manYdemo ratsto k' yo'uryncl Al1enll.t 'dl1fete.nf times thecampalgn'tVhlc.hdoll 'M nda now.thit'tht to l1OW b e o I : phonOgraPhts'now toteacb 't e recel s extbook'and t1rentyoact l .Qn :1J1 tbebO ltls lormofquellUona I beg1n.'putsthe. oc under fitst'lesa9nlnth6maehlne tubeIlJnhfle&ra'an4 ItarUthe r 'c -The pald byth. 4 & ay' 'jPovemment' . a ot.Xexlco t. for.tx' Fr nc.laco ne. a1)er a thl'wealtb t. t 1nBavaria Itaars.thatat .tnter afrat. ID Omeffom th m ane. rewblle not' 'beworthWl 1'heSe11rurea Um.altea tbe' bueof' al1'appeal.for'thecare Jh 'Is' l'ood1fa7.to:1'0" .1J1',6. C . rn y against rees'bu' b In'tb .twenty t iro ofBer u pub orbelongfnr t o 'bodi S. there' are. Oyolwnu. l'oY&l1ibrary' cont.abs'over 'th.unlver.1tY.Ubr oYailltat1llUca bureau13GOOQTb.- acadeIiYOOU'ICUOncoM1sta f88.000 'volwnes.tha 'ot. .staft. of'GI'lOO th t .fLthe han 'ry1U3O' rte " 1VeI kn 1rn''ie ch' hunter."bu' 'a oi'naturat Z re. Arter4u arihaft OOlee u' Jmmensellal1.loplng40 wu .ufcnest\ tta.1apnitea-'n I1neana &lm trees. plemare .1 eaIJUtufand ne. netYleetlnhe1gbto 'nearlyto'tf1. Ukethlafor- ofa on l . rved'I11Jin1'Oti1 kno v' or'piL 'inCQlumbU& c 1mn i e'j ) G.W Ogtetreel6ed Dineyean.tb6 "wUe OtPrI ! J.LW g1etree4Ie rlLt ' t cltYo.rte. W1iK''ofiieiit'3.t 3 Wittdled W ' ried't 'he' IntaataQI1 Of are has use cook a de- a pot Is thj liOrethan wasdoujin Jooei5c3 Leyden comma g denerai endmong s wer'- Q- acre andO gaflanteonreder ate wh lion city. 0 h th thatthe o iiai tut .the .A Wilaen wa the- most -many of citizen wa Botbe It to tei five famii o lines .A corner ut theyoungsters. from Ever Th t hadladies t eey thing iiy -Vi of 400 'spare& city em the- 4utbtt iy took0055ee- 't.ii the wadrifttflg. oee of a. law. When a. any had to military authoritIes. juneoccurred the first m etlnt eaylngtbat the A. W. and the return of speedy eounselinw of floe 'Governor the war the as 'even the in- wit law infutore " i which be whec the i'eatoth PorL andperhaps reconstruction of those der ploasantchapter- a. time after the 'end of our it still Prom Georgia primaries are states-a all Ilracti'ally'have the courthouse too thecounty. figures expresaedtheir nlflce t clique nqminations 1 in titiz iickd into It is more the County exedu- in regective and will state a a 1astMonday s 5r faiiaa ha.party -andecorda of its offis iiszneinbers the -be- th iccjo Of could pu a would'bea z'et tn tothi t to ttOtb . andpisrerdayiof S b- Chaff.- I as there-was S I supremeiyieappy has AllefltXo'w nowthattht'eaight Democratic blood iinow Ce a pupi1' ready ieesonin his eb2a2n4 gaph -the tInlttdStates one year allthegovernnient stat. It says netincoine of is to-go trees or eta the 135,000 coil'c'Joa or 2Gto ume. 3 haeexplored or ZOO hafl antI a eet has been-observed cave or a' Deathstn ColumtIeiz June 13.- Mr l6rs. 1fe Wittt yeltfday and was buried infant sonGt Mt. 4 Mrs. wLaeiitead. .5 ; - - ¬ , " . . ¬ - * . * " ¬ , . " ¬ , - . , ' . . . * , . * , * * - , . * ; - . , , , - . " " . . * / * . ; , . . . - , , . , - . . . * , * - . . , * . . . * * * - , - . * . ' * . - " * . ' " . " , . . " - . ' ' * , , ¬ , . : , , . , - - - - . . . - , , ' , . ' - - , " , . - , . , ¬ . , " . ' ' . . , ' . * . . . , . , , . , ¬ , , , ¬ . ; ; , - . . * * , . ¬ . . / . . , ; . , . , * , , , . , . ' * . , . : - . . ' , . , ' * . , , . . . ' , . , , < ' . - = " . > . \ , - - . . , , „ _ - . _ _ _ - . . , . . . - . , ¬ , . - . ' . . . , . : _ . . ' . , , . _ . . . * , , . . . . . * . . ' ; ; < > * ; : ¬ ' . * _ " - - * , * ' , ' . * " , , , * ¬ . . ' ' * , ' ( . . ' * - - ' : , ' . ' ' ' , ' ; : ' " ' ' ' ' " . 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Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 14 Jun 1898, Tue,
  3. Page 4

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