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 - 0 MISSISSIPPI SOLDIER STATESMAN JURIST. 'yH...
0 MISSISSIPPI SOLDIER STATESMAN JURIST. 'yH was.riclujl 4on'tsthlnkjlstYer saw Conkling's wattles quite so red. The crossing of swords came up In this Way When the time arrived for the discussion of what was known as the army bill a measure in which the democrats were Interested but which the republicans were anxious to defeat by unfair methods Mr. Lamar asked for the privilege of taking up a bill to create a Mississippi river commission which he promised would not occupy more than twenty minute There was Bome sobjection as the republicans were anxious to filibuster but the consent of the body was finally 'obtained. As soon as the twMty minutes expired the army bill was taken up and then followed one of those protracted sittings which sometimes result from filibustering tactics. The day's session was prolonged until noon of the next day. About midnight a wrangle occurred between Senators Elaine and Saulsbury in which the latter charged the for. met and his party with obstructing legislation. Conkling participated in this debate and among other things charged Lamar and other democratic senators with having acted In bad faith with the republican minority. In closing be said "While I re main a member of this body no minority shall be gagged down or throttled or in suited by such a proceeding as this. I say Mr. President and I measure my assertion that it was an act not only insulting but an act of bad faith. As soon as Conkling took his seat Lamar was recognized. After explaining his con nection with the bill under consideration he added. "With reference to the charge of bad faith which the senator from New York has intimated toward those of us who have been opposing these motions to ad burn I have to say that if I am not et itacoaYlctas' the confidence of. his constituents. H has maintained it because of the southern est mate of hU statesmanship and integrity. sun another phase of Mr. Lamar's character is found in the following piece o newspaper gossip "Beneath Mr. Lamar's quiet and dreamy exterior one would not recognize the tact that he was a man of passionate nature and that at one period of his life he was devoted to athletic sports. He was a splendid swordsman and was likewise skillful in the use of the gloves Ha was always happy to take up the foils with any on who was skilled In fencing and at on time he was possessed of Wonderful physical strength. His arms and shoulder were almost as solid as those of a prize fighter. Those who have only considered him as dreamy and scholarly would ban been surprised If they could have seen Mr Lamar behind a foil. He had great agility and vigilance and be often crossed swords with professional teachers of fencing and rarely could one of them touch him with the button In speaking of Mr Lamar's fighting qua itles Dr. Mayes says "In theory Mr. La- mar was a duellist la practice he never fought one. Standing upon the strictest punctilio of the code of honor so that h occasionally figured as a referee in affair of that nature his career was a signal example of that working of the code which its better advocates insist upon .for its Justification a tendency to heal quarrels rather than to Inflame them. He never acted as a t econd in a duel and in early life formed a resolution to which he always adhered and sometimes under very trying Circumstances that he never would do so. In speaking of tie Lamar family Dr. -v gt shows that'll was then living In Prince George's -county By that instrument ho left What se ms to be quite a Urge estate. both to Maryland end England to hiwife. Ann and his two sons. Thomas and John. The-second Thomas also left a ffUK dated May 11. 1717 In which ha divid dHS'prop- arty between his six SODS and two soils-Inlaw. In the year 1755 three 'of these sons- Robert Thomas and John and one of the sons-in-law moved down Into South Carolina and Georgia. This settlement in these southern colonies may have given rise In later yean to the Georgia tradition t t four brothers came to America. John Lamar. son of John was a grand on of the John who came to Georgia He was born in 1769 and married his cousin- german Rebecca Lamar. Among the children by this marriage were Lucius Qulntus dnclnnatus Thomas Randolph Mirabeau Bonaparte tad Jeffenwn Jackson besides four daughters. John Lamar had the rare good fortune of seeing two of his sons achieve distinction. Of these Mirabeau the -younger was born in 1789. He was a writer collier lawyer statesman and diplomat serving In tho war for Texan Independence and afterwards becoming presi dent of the Texas republic. L. Q. C. was born in Warren county on the. 15th day of July 1'157. He passed his boyhood however. In Putnam county to which his father removed. About the year 1818 having been admitted to the courts of law and equity he opened an office in Mil- ledgavllle. He was subsequently exalted to the bench and acquired the reputation of being the ablest judge in Georgia a man of profound learning and scholarship. la the midst of -these honors however he suddenly died at the early age of thirty- seven leaving a wife and several children among whom was L. Q. C Lamar Jr. Lucius Qahjtns Cincmnatus Lamar was born at the old Lamar homestead In Put Earn county Georgia on the 17th of September. Much of his childhood was spent there. To his latest days ho retained a longing for the old place and .delighted to indulge In reminiscences of the bid life when a child. The scenes were apparently as clearly and durably cut as if they had been cameos. There was a large old- fashioned two-story house or mansion with a wide gallery along Its entire front. The white-washed walls of the airy rooms were hung with pictures of which one. symbolizing a nightmare had been painted ay "Uncle e a beautiful woman asleep upon a aofa and a great shadowy horse's head thrust through the window above her. An Immense front yard was filled with grand 'oaks and Lombardy pop- ars There was an orchard filled with fruit trees resonant with the hum of busy bees about the labors of their hives and thrilling with the insistent song of birds Then there was the blade mam my" the indispensable factotum of the southern nursery and the fascinated ter 'rots of those restless nights when she would try to frighten Lucius to sleep with threats of the devil who would come out of the blade hole under the garret stair and catch him if he wasn't good. As dearly as he loved his grandfather's home his own residence was of course with his father In MBtedgevUle 7udge La- mar It seems had also at one time a reel- ence In Scottsboro a village some four or five miles from Mllledgeville and it was there so far as appears from the papers till extant that Lucius received his first schooling. He also attended the school t Midway. Then came the sad event of his father's. death shortly after which Mrs. Amar moved to the town of Covington for le purpose of educating her boys. Near tovington was located the old Georgia Conference Manual Labor school. Dr. Alxander Means was the principal. To flue school Lucius was sent for three years during Ore period from 1835 to 1838. In August. 1841. Lucius entered the fresh man class at Emory college Oxford Ga He graduated In July. 1845. This Institution had been chartered Id'1837 and in 1SU its ret class Kraduote4."jXJnder UwTauspices of the Methodist church Its president was then Judge A. B. Longstreet During the first year of his college course Lucius manifested no special ability. His grade was highest in the classics and lowest in mathematics. He was a member of the Phi Gamma Society and its records chow that he was a leader In its debates. On every occasion he was awarded a speaker's place. Graduating in 1845 Mr. Lamar began a study of the law at Macon Ga In the office of Absalom H. ChappeU. After two years he was admitted to the bar of Vienna in Dooly county. On the 15th of July. 1847 Mr. Lamar was married to Miss Virginia LaFayette Longstreet. daughter of Judge A. B. Longstreet author of "Georgia Scenes. Dr. Hayes in this connection glees quite a lengthy and entertaining sketch of the practicing JSAT first at CovJnston and then aiMconJt e a term lajthe state legislature. Fittrng to- receive the- democratic nomination for congress and disgusted at the triumph of the know lug party in Georgia Mr Lamar returned to Mississippi la OSS. to- less than tw years he was elected to congress from that state. His first speech on the Nicaragua question brought bins Into' national promt' acne. at a bound. Subsequent speeches only served to Increase his reputation andj again In 1859 he was re-elected to congress Representing orthodox sentiment at th south en tho question. Of slavery Mr. La- mar participated In all the etlrring debate of that period. During this session of con- gresshe was elected to the chair of ethics and metaphysics In the University of His elssippt which position he accepted stilU retaining hh'eeat in congress. Ontheelec tfon .of Mr. Lincoln Mr. Lamar resigned. his seat and came home. In speaking ofl T g jhis im8 Blaice In his "Twenty Years in Congress. says "He stood firmly by his state. In accordance with th i creed in which he had been reared but looked.back with tender regret to the unlonJ whose destiny he had wished to share and under the- protection of whose broader 4 Uonallty he had hoped to live and die. Mr Lamar became a member of the find confederate congress."but did not retain his seat jongr as he preferred the life otj a soldier'on the field of battle. He was made lieutenant colonel of the First regi-M mentiOrganized In Mississippi. After leav-i tag for the front he was prostrated by se vets illness and forced to return home not. however until he bad acquired some dls-i Jlnctlon as a brave and fearless officer. InJ November 1SC2 Mr. Lamar was sent t Russia as a special envoy. After the wit he .held himself aloof from politics for ser eral vents occupying a professorship liv the University of Mississippi and devoting nimsn to toe restoration 01 ms privates fortunes. However In 1872 he consented to make the race for congress again and was elected. Itwas during this session od congress that he delivered his famous 4' gy on Sumner. The public is familiar with Mr. .Lamar's record since the war including his careeq In the senate and his service in the cabinet and on the bench. Dr. Maya has reviewed the stirring events of the last thirty yearsw showing the situation here at the south and the reasons which influenced Mr. Lames-I in the various attitudes which he assumed and the great speeches which he delivered during that per.od. The book contains all the speeches of Mr. Lamar and no one who reveres the-memory V f this great GeorgUa should fail to" procure a copy f th'i- book One Honest "M Dear Editor Please inform your reader that if written to confidentially I will man in a sealed letter the plan pursued by which I was permanently restored to health and manly vigor after years of suffering from nervous weakness night losses and weak. shrunken parts. I have no scheme to extort money fttmt any one whomsoever. I was robbed .and Dwindled by the quacks until faith in mankind but thank L .TC now wen. vigorous and strong and to make this certain means of cure to all. -f Having nothte to sen or i I want nomoney. Address i woat u JAME3 A. I nearly heaven. MERCUR. UTAH'S HEW EL DOTtATX- f "Wonderful-Development of the CanrjJ. Ployd Mining District w The Camp Floyd mining district oTTTtah distant. 6ot" mUesjfrom BaltXeJce City is" now attracting- toe attention of the world as theNmly western rival of Cripple Creek. Coin. The district has had a most remarkable history. The town ct Lewiston rose flourished and t passed Into decay twenty-five years ago on the Yerjrrt spot on which Men baa been built within the last eighteen months. It was re nowned as a silver camp in 71. and from that time until ism okMimera tell of tie- many big strikes in tie district tat it ws not until 1810 that gold was found. At' tention was then called to the McArthur- Porrest cyanide process and a test of in ore was made in Denver with such elabo rate results that the old mines and manyr new ones were put on drrtdHid-payliyr basis. The formation at Mercur is vem similar to the region about Joitaanesburg in south Africa except that the Camp Floyd ore bodies are larger and richer Geologists and mineralogists differ as to the origin and formation of the ore body some claiming three distinct gold bearing veins while others seem to favor th 7..1 I r.itt.i. raH rft 1i y 7. Conklfng's'watUe. ql1lteaoted. e .fi'Wbe .ed Jorthe'd1a cueso otwliait wukD wn"U.tbe 'army .blll. a.meas re th demo r t a.nxl us dete..t'brunfalr' metl ods was' .objection tb otiho Ii. 'the army' &ken onoof prc tracted slttngswh4ch sionwasprolonged l1 tda.y. le lsla.- tlon.Conkllng mongOther havln h reo. In- b a pr ceed.ln Iuy I e. .itth .r th ej O. tJ..t hJa. i COI1. n''Ctt "i. 'ODJ .r. .thecontJdenc othfS OOntItue t.s.'ll.'J1 i ta.lned i bccau e'ot.t 8 ou atate8 Ji e 1t1. Mr.Lama.r'I th paeceot that. v as f bights d wor smu-- 1i1 11tul theglove u 'any 'was atllne flgb.t r dr rDY theycouJd I t nndheoften qual- foughtlJne. 't he. It rath r a'i and' so F irlri t t.leema to. a. 'large. both'lnlIaryl&nd lfto his wife Th maa .J Th8" eooDd letta. r 1141in hlchJi. divided d roP- betw nhis "ofthe e' ons- 'I'ho John-and on.eoftho moveddownlnt 8 th 6e south rn D1Ayhave 7ea.n1to that brot ra I 'a .on whocameio ce .u L mar hlevo 'these w a tnl789 a.nd.dl- thew .r becomlngvresl- hl .Abo t to' anoIDce lll- th 1h abi t ese 'amo C. CinC1IU1atuSLaDlar w ldLamar otSeP- 1125. ret 1ned th ront ot. hB.d.bee1i by h ad wa late. fn ttrees resonant'with humot &bo t my"-the d tas a.ted resU ss nl hts thedevll.who wasn'tgoGd. gra dtather'l ms. ares- d fo r 1II1ledgevilleand.1twa. from.the still Lucl sr lved at Sh rtly whch'lIra. Lamar otCGvington' fO the h r th GeO tooprinclpaJ. T 183S'to lSU.Lu01use lered th Emqryc.ollege. Oxtofd. G InJuly,18 .Th1S be D. tharte ndiJilSUtts first cl du .te4 uD'de'r.the splce ehurclJlt.spr sldent w l.s Durtnithe oflWJ ma. 1- ade was r b tan at.1IIacon. Lnthe H .After otJuly. -Ceo U1 6 j II i ba legislaturefF'a.WDgA dlB ed tthjj U1 mPh"ot kn wno lng'partyJ11.r" l'llaw"Ht n to.UsslsJlppIUn. lJi..less tha hewu'el'JOt d c D resis'trom tirstisp Cb' \theN1C que ltlonbrou i hlDi' l 1t'o'na.t.IoDal nence bound.SubSequent. only..aeed tncr a.se hJ agalnJn .8S9'h wure- Iected.to con' Rep ntlng at. 'cn iho.quesUo 'tr'La mar'p ru lpJ.tedin theBUrring' ofthatperloo. Dortngthi gTess. he 'el cted t et andi tJiit' Un.1v rslty'ot 1 hpoll. e.accepted.atll On the' .LJncoln 'reslg e4f nd. Lamar. .aqhJs e Bla.I 'e hi. S - 1 Y 'In. ongress 8 o 1 mly hI$5 accordance'l"ltb' thel c mWl 1ch'he ed.butl ck wi t derregret 1mI3 whO -"ieStt Yh hadw18hed. underth& bt"hoBo e1 ad ho toJlve' Mr'L n ai ecame &nlemb toot he conr. l' \e. JIlgT..esS''b..U. t. dld.not. 8OOt' ong.-as.he.preferredth&Utfe. B'soldief'on'the tle 1d .ot ,1e'WU cOlo 1l'L ment organized ississiPpLArter.l &v' r'the froJlt1 \Vasprostlated Ira& andtorced toreturn o r.unt1t hada.cqutred omec11s--i .th ctlon Ii-brave Urteamu' .II r Amar.'f"&aEent .104 nf .th War 11-31. dblms. elf. alootJro. poU. ti. cs. mJ. eralvears. tn.l e tP rsIot 1ssi QV C' nuns u .to tlle. OI.lllIJ Ortu. .n.t's. HOW. ve.r es1. tomake'the' ra.cetor agatn'a.nd wU' d rtrg' grosstb .the hIa.tamous aon Stlln 1er fam u8.rir1th'Mr a re ord s.ln e' tMwar.1ncJud lg h1sS' the'senattt servlU'tn tabin andonhe b ncl1Dr Mayesh .s revfe ye UJ t. ye showjesltan he 11 a thereaDs 'hlch'influenc:1 L In.the U.a titdewhcthe a ct sP. eSW..h. Chh.e'd. eli. T. durg p oT6 bk' ct t spc'ourrLadnoe rvr "thtmeor"ot t t .Gr. shoud 'fUto pro. a cp bk j" c' J.1on1. 1 D EdtorP eu 'inor. fcf writtnto condentJw1 m& inaea e g i Jny'vgor.after"ea.rsof' auel tf e' 'n tJ ead schetextortmoDq. one.who1vr. .wasrbbecL swnded bytbe quck utI'J 'l f&th.n md'but 'tha hevit I wen vtgrou ad stng a m o t me of C. r.no t.UnO.ed J wat nomo ne Ad s. "r..i. .A A .Bx2 r' MCu 1 W'fr Donq WD f t A 1 f J 4 'b now. - .U. g. e e .u 0. ot'.1 d. a' tho' n Me Ciple Crk Cla Te c b'h xst.remkle hom. To Ltonre .10ur pe dey tet-fve'e. a conto. 'Ye. st w. Mer h bn bt i .1eJeltem"nw i noed as'a.stercln a 4 thatu.Iol. o may tl St. e .1..1e dt. i t. tnt Sty ot W thatgl w fut tentoas.tbecalle t te ru Frt cyade press' ad tet. of1 'ore.W m 1 De w rater ults.t.t.ta O. k m. e. 'a new"oe. puO" is. tol a. M 1 Y s1a t t r n.a suh cAkeot.t. 'to. C bes .nL le. a r Gl g,8 metsd1er. t' or' trn.or. the. o. bT se' t dt. cd vei 'hie oe se tr t 1' k tI 7 1 M I 'JIL H F" 1 I OE 46ntthipk 1. eve rjt. th was'eaken thatif elth.erthe. 'Outage 'of blss000viattonvr II..ha. t asti- I of periodof one o that he re.- county"l3ythat seams a.4111 11 nis G gi otJohn whocame 17 dentof Qu.tnt an UT a S S nursery-end. ter- h hii onetisno deuce four.or Thencmrie ad IS4l.Luclusretered an d iAiS4l theauspic churc1ts pr bilit 'as I pracucingiasy rtat an Ma4ontb$4e'aerv'flt a in' FaI1IDgtO t returx twe as po-oc anz ta I. gives bewas a at say looked back'wIth andg Lainarbecame drs enigress but retainJ seatong of soldiep on rcg1 l4av- se.- riot t. hlrn.selfaloof i lo audi It was ofi CabInet4 uth beassurnett4 andtheT'great one'who4 'of e thl. 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Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 19 Apr 1896, Sun,
  3. Page 15

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