Variations on Christmas Plum Pudding.

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Variations on Christmas Plum Pudding. - CHB1STUA8 PLUM PUDDING. Octave Ttianet'i Beclpe...
CHB1STUA8 PLUM PUDDING. Octave Ttianet'i Beclpe How Christmas Ii Unnamed In the 'ed. Copyrighted by The Constitution. The first time I as taught to make a Christmas plum pudding 017 hair disturbed itself with terfror As nearly as 1 can rec- oleit this Is like what happened My teacher swept be hand toward a neatly but- teivd pudding mold and a bag oft he biscuit that formerly even In Boston were called crackers. I used to think said she "that the crackers most be soaked in milk over night It says to in the cook books I ventured timidly Cooking recipes the answered "remind me of conjure-charms they require so much faith and whatever they leack ID sense they mike up In awful mystery. Did you ever n nice how in the average recipe everything Is on the same le the most trivial di -carton and the most valuable' Take to soaking the cralers over night what it the object why to soften them isn't it Well why n t roll them so that there shall be smaller pieces which will soften much more quickly. and use ho milk or water instead of cold and do th softening in ten minutes instead of ten hjuif See' She djfth ranged cue crackers they were large rounl milk biscuit of the sort that old old cooks affected for scalloped t A LA FIFTEENTH CENTURY. oysters on a molding board and rolled UHUI auto crumbs Hou many crumbs' said I meekly i shall take a pint said she for a pudding for six or ht people und that will li ample I shall thoroughly wet it with boiling milk if 1 didn't t ha\e milk I snouul take water und no mortal would be ili \uscr Ihese things are unimportant N w will you beat up four egg But first the learner asked hoping to mike all iiupnssi n of careful tiactuesi how much water or milk do you take' 'The impression was not made she gave ma a glace of direct scorn as she said in a dry tone That depends entirely upon the cia kers some will soak up a deal more than others 1 should be sure you nn er bad cooked from just that question What you have to look for is the result Pour in your hot fluid until the entire mass is wet and can be stirred You can say as uff as a stiff cake batter I positively did nut dare to ask her how guff that was but 1 gazed intently on tile smooth mass f irurabs which now began to wear the appearance of dough and 1 timorously separated the whites of four eggs from the A oiks "Yon needn't do that said she care- essly it is quite as well if not better to Seat them all up together Get me a tea Liicui an uy v x. spoonful of cinnamon and half a teaspoonful ofcloves and a teaspoonful of allspice and a dash of ginger if you like it and mil them together with a small wine gla s of good brandy. lh will c lor the pudding darker in a liquid form than the will it put in dry and give it ui re flavor too That is worth your remembering how take heaping pint of fruit observe it there- is candied lemon peel and there is candied orange peel and cherries all cut very small eicept the cherries as well as currants citrons and raisins I soak the cherries a little in hot water to soften them They are nicer than raisins For Christmas I put in twice as much fruit. Do you jun ble tlum all together said I Ccrtaiulv and if I hapie-n to have more of one thing than another that thing goes in more it doesn't t matter Now She sprinkled fine cracker crumbs fine as flour these were over the fruit Sometimes I sprinkle them and sometimes I don t said she eisily I don t think it much matters You see this crumb d ugh is wry warm I put in half a cup of butter and a cup of half molasses and half sugar u Ion t use suet No I Ion t suet was u el to save butt r It is not nearly so delicate and it turns up in clammy cold white lumps when the pulling is cold Butter mu butter f r me even time \nd I ilou t boil in a 1 en cloth r ured into a sort of mongrel planter of pans cast I don t boil it at all I steam it lion long Three or four hours I made no c comment but in my secret mind I t exported a verv queer pudding for dinner I was disappointed It was the be t plum pu 1 ling tint I had ever eaten Therefore I submit a h t of ingredients Iet I Plum In One heaping pint of biscuit crumbs one quart of fruiu chernes lemon and orange peel cition currants and raisins one cup 0 UK r an 1 molasses one large wine glass of brui kj one teaspoonful of allspice one teaspoonful of cinnamon one-half teaspoonful of cloves nutmeg to taste four eggs milk to moderately soften the dough 1 am bound to confess that this hit-or- miss pudding has never missed in my experience. It should be served with a little brandy poured around it and set on fire just as it enters the dining room Alcohol will make a more brilliant display than brandy but the flavor of the pudding is not so good by a long long distance hard sauce flavored with lemon and brandy is the conventional aTwompaniment People of sets- t in ut sometimes stick a sprig of holly in the pudding but when the liquid about it is afire the holly is apt to blaze and the children may have more .au than is good for them A plum pudding has a costly sound but it r ill\ w i' nit be expensive A family of moderate means who eat bread three times a day will accumulate in a few days enough crusts and stale pieces to drj in the oven afterward to be rolled into crumbs and soaked m a quart of milk A cup of beef suet from the last roast of beef you may trust the butcher to help the weight along with plenty of trimmings a cup of molasses about three teaspoonfuls of spice a cup of currants and one of seeded and cut raisins will with some good sauce make a very toothsome pudding t ggs make it lighter and better but eggs may be omitted when the\ are forty cents a dozen A very excellent plum pudding which mar be as rich or as plain as one chooses is the Brown Broad Plum Pudding. To any good recipe for brown bread Boston brown bread. I mean add spices and fruits and brandy in the proportions most convenient and according as your hand with the dainties has been liberal you have an agreeable plain pudding or a steamed wedding cake pudding We find the following recipe very satisfactory One pint of rye flour one pint corn meal very fine and white one teaspoonful soJt one cup of molasses in which has ben melted one-half cup of butter one glass of brandy in which has been stirred three teaspoopfnls of mixed spjces put more hi If vou likfe the taste one quart of mixed fruits one pint of sour milk one teaspoonful of wda Boil for three hours in brown bread tin placed in a kettle of hot water which must never be allowed to stop boiling for a second unless yon wish to see a heavy band wreathed like a hand- euff round the pudding to mark the place Bow As-nearly sWE' t ten. pudding-mold Bo totlz "I "It "Cook.in he rOIlJur hllrws l ck uotice le\ e-the di. .c rion not lm ller whi h h L n g tly la e roan' old oned I onJ. mol llj-bol1l'd "I IX 1J"l\mlJlc mill.-if tlt. wiser. Th" e 'W. t t I"arn r illn some fr m qUP6 on. 'ou o a k. mten y rn.a s of bt an separate i yolks. "it sp Onf11l of doves a d Tbpy color pu dll g in they ll b" ye worp j aYor .too. orth ow th re is lit e Theyare ni r raisins. in "Do jum le I. in dll sn't Xow"- were-over fruit- don't ea ily. "I don't dough Iln\ sugar"- "y"u Ion't don't used t"r. nice for ,10n't in lillPI ftro1lrf mon rel rl\ ter cast-I don't it. Ion n ind t'xpe 'ted very best rUd/lin Thpr fore list fruits-cherries Rn suar ant brunkr tea poonful all.p ce' teu p ouful clnlUl.IIlonj tE.'a poon- nUlllJ g tastl.four m eraIRly rience. gooa 'A fia vored tillJ'nt is IIl Y .1ll is rally ' pieces In CU ou \Veig t lI.l n th tri IIlg T ry Eggs e d en. 8 e I'OWD have.an followinf 0 t n teaspoonf la ou Uk the th b plAced'in hich boU nI 111 k ba bis- sayssoiutbecookbook m the l the td \1 1 muIdingboard Non- inipressiun ut a a it. mi glass i a jumble "No. it" pudding Jte t PnIdI -vil brand' ish ronn he . 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Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 18 Dec 1892, Sun,
  3. Page 30

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