Sally Ride Challenger launch (News-Press, 1983)

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Sally Ride Challenger launch (News-Press, 1983) - FORT MYERS 1A T Partly cloudy Details 24A High...
FORT MYERS 1A T Partly cloudy Details 24A High in the 90s; low in the 70s A GANNETT NEWSPAPER Fort Myers, Florida, Sunday, June 19, 1983 Final Edition 99th YearNo. 210$1.00 Spa ''gl8-to ''gl8-to ''gl8-to V," rv- rv- It t , V?1 - f ' V' "Llichael k.' fero Nnaannet News" Ser vice Space shuttle Challenger lifts off a fraction of a second late from Cape Canaveral launch pad Communications satellite goes out right on schedule Shuttle coverage 6A From News-Press News-Press News-Press Wire Services CAPE CANAVERAL After 22 years and 57 men, the United States put a woman in space Saturday. Sally Ride, a 32-year-old 32-year-old 32-year-old 32-year-old 32-year-old astrophysicist, went right to work, sending a Canadian Canadian satellite spinning out of Challenger's Challenger's cargo bay. After the crew settled down for their first night in space, flight director director John Cox summed up the first day as "a super successful day." He said none of the astronauts complained of illness. Neither Ride nor her four male crewmates aboard Challenger made note of the breakup of a men-only men-only men-only group. But as fire belched from the tail of the shuttle at the beginning of Flight Seven, the voice of launch control control exulted: "Liftoff, liftoff of STS-7 STS-7 STS-7 and America's first woman astronaut!" astronaut!" On the shuttle's seventh turn around Earth, Ride conducted critical critical checkout procedures and then pushed the button that ejected the $24 million Anik-C Anik-C Anik-C communications satellite at a precise point over the Pacific Ocean, southwest of Hawaii. Her fellow mission specialist, John Fabian, said, "As previously advertised, advertised, we deliver." Pilot Hauck maneuvered the shuttle shuttle six miles below and eight miles behind the Anik-C, Anik-C, Anik-C, owned by Telesat of Canada, to keep it safe from the satellite's kick motor, which appeared to fire perfectly 45 minutes minutes later.

Clipped from
  1. News-Press,
  2. 19 Jun 1983, Sun,
  3. Main Edition,
  4. Page 1

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  • Sally Ride Challenger launch (News-Press, 1983)

    staff_reporter – 19 Feb 2018

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