Women’s History in Newspapers

Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth (c. 1797 – November 26, 1883) was an American activist for abolitionism, women’s rights, universal suffrage, and other causes.  Early Life Sojourner Truth was born Isabella Baumfree (or Bomefree) around 1797 in Dutch-speaking New York to enslaved parents. Sold away from her family in childhood, Isabella was owned by several abusive enslavers. In …Read More

19th Amendment

19th Amendment

The 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was adopted on August 26, 1920. The main section states, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” 19th-Century Efforts Early national-level efforts for women’s rights were …Read More

Women protest in Petrograd, Russia, March 8, 1917

International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day (March 8) is an annual day that advocates for women’s rights and celebrates the achievements of women. Origins International Women’s Day (IWD) grew out of the labor movement of the early 20th century in the United States and Europe. The first recognized National Women’s Day was held in the United States on …Read More

Clara Barton

Clara Barton (December 25, 1821 – April 12, 1912) was an American nurse and Civil War hero known for founding the American Red Cross. Early Life Clarissa Harlowe Barton was born in Oxford, Massachusetts, on Christmas Day, 1821, the youngest of five children. Her interest in medical care is often attributed to an early experience …Read More