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The National Era Archive

  • Washington, District of Columbia
  • 18501860

About

The Executive Committee of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society established The National Era as a weekly Washington, DC newspaper, according to the January 2, 1847 article "Anti-Slavery-Reporter, extra" in The Daily Union. First publishedon January 7, 1847 the anti-slavery The National Era was published by L.P. Noble and edited by Dr. Gamaliel Bailey, with corresponding editors Amos A. Phelps, a known scholar and logician, and John G. Whittier, a political contributor. Phelps previously served as the secretary of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, and he died within the first year of the paper's publication, as noted by The Sun on August 5, 1847.While the paper was a proponent of the Liberty party and abolitionism, it was not a party organ, and it never called for unconstitutional or unlawful means to the erasure of slavery, especially in reference to state's rights. In the discussion on slavery, the National Era defended the right to free speech. The National Era published condensed reports of the proceedings of Congress and explained its proceedings to a common audience. The paper took a position to "keep a constant watch upon the action of the Federal Government in relation to all questions at issue between Liberty and Slavery," according to an August 5, 1854 article. The publishers of The National Era also experimented with creating a daily paper called the Daily National Era. It recorded the activities of Congress, to be published, shipped, and sent out by the next morning. It ran from January 2 to August 5, 1854. Ending with that session of Congress, the paper did not gain enough subscribers for the following year's sessions.

Archive Info

  • 2,181
  • Washington, District of Columbia
  • 18501860

Source Information

The National Era, 1850–1860 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2024. Last updated: March 2, 2023

Recent Article Clippings

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James NW Davis 1st Marriage

James NW Davis 1st Marriage

The National Era
Washington, District of Columbia
 • Page 3
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Are Working Men “Slaves” An address by Henry Wilson

Are Working Men “Slaves” An address by Henry Wilson

The National Era
Washington, District of Columbia
 • Page 4
Clipped 

The National Era
Washington, District of Columbia
 • Page 4
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Slave owner for Wm Mills?

Slave owner for Wm Mills?

The National Era
Washington, District of Columbia
 • Page 3
Clipped 

The National Era
Washington, District of Columbia
 • Page 5
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The National Era
Washington, District of Columbia
 • Page 2
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Archive Info

  • 2,181
  • Washington, District of Columbia
  • 18501860

Source Information

The National Era, 1850–1860 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2024. Last updated: March 2, 2023