The Cincinnati Enquirer from Cincinnati, Ohio on May 25, 1936 · Page 17
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The Cincinnati Enquirer from Cincinnati, Ohio · Page 17

Publication:
Location:
Cincinnati, Ohio
Issue Date:
Monday, May 25, 1936
Page:
Page 17
Start Free Trial
Cancel

THE ENQUIRER, CINCINNATI, MONDAY, MAY 25, 1936 17 OTHER LEAGUE RESULTS. WINNER CROSSING FINISH IN WALK TOLEDO SERIES RED BATTING AVERAGES "STROLL" Won By Detroit Man. ' . til ' f Lowell (Mass.) Hiker Next In 31-Mile Walk. Victor's Time Is 5:16.16 One Second Separates Second And Third Contestant. Ernie Crosbie, of the Detroit Track Club, Detroit, Mich., won the United States 50,000 meter walking championship yesterday, over a course starting at Neville, Ohio, and ending at the grounds of the Cincinnati Gymnasium and Athletic Club, walking the distance, xvhich is equivalent to 31 miles and 125 yards, in 5 hours, 16 minutes and 16 seconds. Crosbie finished second to Henry "Hank" Cieman, of Toronto, Ont, in the 1934 and 1935 national championship 50,000 meter walks on this same course. Yesterday Cicman, obviously in distress at the finish of the race, finished fifth, 7 minutes and 22 seconds behind the winner. His record time over, this course of 4 hours and 57 minutes, established last year, still stands. Yesterday's hot cunshine was responsible for the slower time. Only 25 competitive walkers, out of a starting field of 69, finished. Albert J. Mangan, of Lowell, Mass., furnished one of the biggest thrills of the race. A lad of 21, with no previous experience in walks of this distance, he caught up with the veteran Cieman, who was leading the field about five miles from the finish line, and held the lead almost to the Gym club grounds before Crosbie, noted as a slow 'starter and fast finisher, went around him. Mangan finished second, two minutes and 39 seconds behind Crosbie, his official t ime being 5 hours, 18 minutes and 55 seconds. Ernest Koehler, of the German-American Athletic Club of New Y'ork, and John M. Deni, of the Metropolitan Club, Pittsburgh, Pa., staged almost a neck and neck finish, Koehler taking third place one second ahead of the Pitts-burgher. The first man to reach the finish line was W. Mountain of the Maroon Athletic Club of Hamilton, Ontario. He was entered in the recreational division of the race, whose entries started from Neville at 8:50 a. m. The competitive divi- National 50,000 Meter Championship 1. r.rme trosny ; 2. Albert J. Mangan 3. Ernest Koehler 4. John M. Denl 6. Henry Cieman ; 6. Harry L. Clark 7. Phillip Jachelskl 8. Wm, Halee 9. Wm. Chlsholm 10. John Rahkonen 11. Irwin J. Carroll 12. Alden Burroughs 13. Leo Schnepel 14. Clarence Hickman 15. Clarence DeMar 16. Chuck Kline 17. Joe RoBsenhoffer 18. Rudolph Hantke 19. Terrace Brady 20. Sebastian E. Llnehan 21. H. Tabb 22. Mel Hans 23. Halns Landen 24. A. L. Monteverde 25. Jack Barry Ernie Crosbie, Detroit, winner of the thirty-one-mile walking race yesterday, from Neville, Ohio, to the Cincinnati Gym Grounds, is shown as he crossed the finish line. Sam Schwartz and Mike Schwartz, both of New York, who were judges of the walk, are shown with the winner. Sam is to the left. ACES MADE Continued From Page 13. son Gene defeated George Todd and his son George, 2 and 1, in a best-baller at Clovernook. . , . Loth Newberg and Lou Gutman were all square at the end of 18 holes in the finals for the President's Trophy at Losantiville. They will play off the tie next Sunday. Nate Rosenberg beat Dick Kaufman, 2 to 1, and M. B. Kahn defeated Bob Wise, 3 and 2, in the semi-final round for the Vice President's Trophy. . . . Campbell Dinsmore carded five threes to win the prize for the most number treys at the Cincinnati Country Club. F. E. Good carded four treys and Rudolf Homan, three. . . . The blind bogey swag at Wyoming went to J. H. Cleveland, C. D. Drury, J. N. Wilkinson, G. B. Doll, M. A. Fuller, M. Ruston, Roy Elliott, and J. W. Friend. Maketewah's blind bogey winners wer,e W. Foster, Carl Wenzel, J. H. Deekin, W. E. Blackburn, and L. A. Davison. MID-ATLANTIC LEAGUE. Johnstown, Pa., May 24 (AP) A savage assault which scored nine runs in the first two Innings gave Johnstown a 10-to-6 Mid-Atlantic victory over Zanes-vllle today. The Johnstown team nicked three Zanesville pitchers for 12 hits, while the Greys reached Lee, the Johnstown hurler, for 14 safe hits. Score by Innings: Innings .. . 1 23450789 R. H. IS. Zanesville ..30001100 1 6 14 1 Johnstown ..45000010 x 10 12 3 Batteries Zanesville: Hvisdo, Babich, Stancue, and Hahn; Johnstown: Lee and Grey. Canton, Ohio, May 24 (AP) Canton got in just ahead of a severe thunderstorm today to defeat Akron 6 to 0 in a Mid-Atlantic League ball game. Canton scored all six runs in the fourth inning. The storm forced the game's end Immediately after Akron had batted in the first of the fifth. Score by Innings: Innings. 1 2 i Akron 0 0 I Canton 0 0 ( 5 R. H. E. 00 3 X 6 2 0 Batteries Brown, Ramsdell, and Strauo; Ulrich and Condon. t N. Y.-FENN. LEAGUE. (FIRST GAME) Innings ... 123456789 R, H. E. York 00300000 03 7 2 Binghamton ..00002024 x 8 11 0 Batteries Rogers and Couts;1 Rego and Rosar. (SECOND GAME) Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R. H. E. York 0 0 0 0 1 0 23 8 1 Binghamton 003002 x 5 6 1 Batteries Brown and Guerra; LaFlamme and Reilly. (FIRST GAME) Innings 123456789 R. H. E. Allentown ....00111020 05 11 0 Elmlra 02010001 0 4 7 3 Batteries Barr and Smilgof; Claset and Klumpp. (SECOND GAME) Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R. H. E Allentown 0 0 0 0 1 0 01 6 1 Elmlra 000130 x 4 8 2 Batteries Winston, Houtekamer, and Smilgof; Krause and Klumpp. (FIRST GAME) Innings. . . 123456789 10 11 R H E Wllkes-Barre 000000000 0 00 6 0 Hazleton... 000000000 0 11 8 0 Batteries Day and Wasem; Mulcahy (SECOND GAME) '""'"S' 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R. H. E. Wllkes-Barre 3 0 0 0 1 1 05 10 1 Hazleton 0 0 0 0 0 1 01 7 i Batteries Kerdock and Stats; Judd and Stack. (FIRST GAME) Inning 123456789 R. H E Scranton 1 (1 ll 2 (i in n i , , Wllllamsport ..02200000 04 8 0 Batteries Shoffner a)nd Van Orafski-Ahearn and Stelnecke. ' INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE. Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R. H. E. Rochester 00801201 214 20 i Balo 0 0 1 0 5 1 0 1 3-11 15 1 Batteries Harrell, Michaels, Kleinke and Polanf; Kline, Llsenbee, Wilson, and Grouse. First Game Innings 1 2 .1 4 5 6 7 8 9 R. H. E. 7,ornto 00120000 1 4 11 0 Montreal 000030000 .1 s ,Batte,re Mooty, Nekola, and Heath; Wade, Hcnsick, and Myatt. Second Game-Innings,. , 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R. H. E. Toronto ...010200 0 341 Montreal ... 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 11 0 Batteries Pattcaon and Heath; Polll and Tate. First Game r. Inning 1 2 3 4 5 8 7 8 9 R. H. E. Lalllmore ...40000100 2 7 9 i Syracuse 01201001 0 5 7 3 Batteries Berly, Pearce, and Savino; Starr and Heving, Legetl. Second Game Innings... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R. H E Baltimore.. 8 0 3 0 0 1 0-10 11 2 Syracuse. ...000020 3 573 Batteries Pearce and Savino; Brown Mangum. Reder, and Legett. First Game-Innings 123456789 R. H. E. Newark 41003000 0 8 13 0 Albany 1000000001 8 3 Batteries Plechota and Collins; Delacruz, Bokina, Benton, and Mackle. Second Game Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 R. H. E. Newark 0000002 O 2 4 1 Albany 0000002 1 3 5 2 Batteries Sundra, Wicker, Makosky, and Baker; Pettlt, Matuzak, Delacruz, and Redmond. PAOIFK! 4'OAST I.EAGl'K. First Game-Innings 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R. H. E. Portland 00000200 0 2 13 3 San F-ancisco. 00000400 x 4 7 0 Batteries French, Larkln, and Brucker; Campbell and Monzo. Second Game-Innings 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R. H. E. Portland 00000300 0 3 5 4 San Francisco. 13000002 x 6 9 1 Batteries Posedel and Brucker; aibson and Salkeld. First Game Innings 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 R. H. E. Missions 02002000 O 4 12 0 Oakland 00000010 2 3 12 2 Batteries Osborne, Lamanske. and Sprlnz; McDonald, Olds, and Herschberger. Second Game Innings 1 2 3 4 5 8 7 8 9 R. H. E. Missions 10000000 4 5 6 0 Oakland 00000010 0 1 7 3 Batteries W. Beck and Sprlnz; Franko-vich, Douglas, Larocca, and Hartje, Kies. First Game Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R. H. E. San Diego.... 100 3 00021 7 12 0 Sacrament i ..0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 7 4 Batteries Salvo. Herbert, and De Sau-tels; Chambers and Narrow, Second Game-Innings 12 3 4 5 6 7 R. H. E. San Dleg 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 Sacramento 000001X 1 3 1 Seven innings, by agreement. Batteries Plllette and Kerr; Plppen and Head. First Game Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R. H. E Seattle 20200300 0 7 12 2 Los Angeles. . 500010000 6 12 3 Batteries Lucas, Osborn, Craghead, Barrett, and Bassler; Casey, Gabler, Berry, and Bottarlnl. Second Game Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R. H. E. Seattle 1000000 1 5 0 Los Angeles 300000 x 3 7 0 Seven Innings, by agreement. Batteries Koupal and Splndel; Salveson and Steiner. SOUTHERN ASHOCIATION. Innings.... 1 2 3 4 5 8 7 8 9 R. H. E. Little Rock.. . 01010200 1 5 13 1 Nashville .... 00000042 x 6 10 4 Batteries Rogers, Porter, and Rice; Eiland, Speece, and O'Malley. First Game-Innings... . 12 3 4 5789 R. H. E. Birmingham.. 00013100 1 6 12 1 Knoxvllle ....0000100001 7 2 Batteries Darrow and Palmleano; Petty, Mooney and Mueller. Second Game-Innings 1 2 3 4 5 8 7-R. H. E. Birmingham 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 10 0 Knoxvllle 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 Batteries Jones and Seume, Palmlsano; Moon and Mueller. Innings.... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R. H. E. Memphl 3 10000000 4 7 0 Atlanta 00120100 15 11 3 Batteries Nelson and Haley; Durham and Galvin. First Game Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1? R. H. E. rt. t irfrftrf n n ft a i I n N.o. 020100100 o o 04 14 2! Batteries Lanahan, McColl. Crompton, i and Holbrook: Wetherell, Perrlnn, Suche, Thomas, and Krole. Second Game-Innings ..123456 R. H. E. Chattanooga 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 12 0 New Orleans 0 2 0 1 0 0 3 6 0 Batteries Messenger and Holbrook, Crompton; Thomas, Perrlnn, and Helf. (Called end sixth; darkness). TEXAS LEAOIE. Fort Worth, 6; Dallas. 0. Beaumont, 4; Galveston, 1. San Antonio at Houston; rain. WESTERN LEAGUE. De Moines 10, Waterloo 1. Cedar Rapids 5, Omaha 4. Sioux City 12, Davenport 2. MARTY LIONS. I CLIFTON CUBS. AB.H.PO.AI AB.H.PO.A Staab.rf 1 0 0 0; Kline, If 3 2 0 0 Bauer.cf 1 1 u Uib& sna.cx i i x u 2 0 2iBrack'an,s 3 113 2 2 3 Kenk'ns.Sb 2 0 0 2 0 8 O EIIIs.lb 3 0 10 2. 0 0 2 Powell, c 3 2 7 1 2 10 SLouls.cf 4 10 0 1 0 C Weller.rf 4 110 1 1 0 Hamburg.rf 10 0 0 Smith, 2b 3 Fisher, sa 4 Rentz.c 4 Berg'an,3b 4 Ryan, lb 3 Sellers, cf 4 Kisee.rf 3 Pete.p 3 2 0 JiW'll'Is.rf 3 10 0 'ranklin.p. 10 0 2 Totals 30 11 21 14 Tierney.p 2 0 0 1 Totals 30 9 2lU Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Marty Lions 0 3 6 0 0 0 Clifton Cubs 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 Two-Ba.ie Hit Ka.iee. Home Runs Pow- en, thorns, weuer, wims. uoudib nay Peele to Lents. Bases on Balls- Off Pete, 4; off Franklin, 5; off Tierney, 8. Balk Franklin, Struck Out By Pete. 7: by Tier- 'y, I. Umpirei-Kobman and GenarrfW '.' Players. AB.R. U. 2B.3B.HR.Pct. Frey 2 1 1 Sehott 17 1 8 Hollingsw'th. 21 S 8 Chapman . . 48 S 16 .500 .471 .381 .348 .333 .323 .282 .278 .264 .262 .262 .229 .216 .213 .18A .154 .143 .143 .120 yjo .000 .000 .000 Lombard! . . 87 14 29 Handley .... 65 10 21 Myers 110 15 31 Rlggs ......108 16 30 Campbell ... 63 914 Herman ....145 21 38 .Cuyler .. 141 32 37 Thevenow . . 48 6 11 McQuinn .. .125 4 27 Goodman ... 89 15 19 Kampnuris .64 9 10 Stine 13 Derringer Walker . Byrd ... GrisHom Brennan Freitas . Hilchesr RKU PITCHING RECORDS. 1'ltchers. W. L. H. SO.BB.Pcl. 1 0 4 0 2 1.000 Frey Hllrher 1 Holllngswortll.. . A Si-hott 3 Grlssom 1 Brennan 1 Derringer 3 Mine 1 FrelUa 0 0 9 0 3 1.000 2 59 21 20 .714 2 44 12 18 .600 I 23 10 6 1 29 12 9 4 75 22 11 6 69 17 12 2 6 11 .500 .600 .429 .200 .000 Nelson, released, one win. Chores. Losing Pitcher Fette. Umpires-Johnson and Swanson. Time of Game 2:00. COLONELS ON TOP, Defeat Hoosires In Game Halted By Rain Score Is 7 To 3. Indianapolis, May 24 (AP) Louisville bunched 10 of its 11 hits in 2 innings to defeat the Indians today, 7 to 3, in a game limited to six innings because of rain. Two errors, sandwiched between three hits, gave the tribe a three-run lead in the second inning, but the Colonels drove Vance Page from the mound with a seven-hit attack in the fourth frame and "Dizzy" Trout, who relieved him was hit hard in the sixth. LOUISVILLE. INDIANAPOLIS. AB.H.PO.AI AB.H.PO.A Rosen, cf 4 Rollings.lb 3 OIBluege.ss 1 1 6 II Fausett,3b 2 0 Eckhardt.lf 1 5 Riddle, c 2 liHeath.lb 1 0 BerKcr.cf 0 OSiebert.rf 3 U:Sherlock,2b 1 0 0 2 1 4 1 9 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Simons, lft 4 Adalr.Zb 4 Mal'sky.ss 3 Brack, rf 3 3lgafoos,3b 3 Kingn'fr.c -i Lamaster.p 3 0 2 Page.p ITrout.p 29 1118 9 Tinning, p Totals I Totals 24 6 18 1U Inning 1 2 3 5 6 0 3 I 0 03 Louisville 0 0 0 Indianapolis 0 3 0 Errors Fausett, Riddie, Mallnosky, Brack. Runs Batted In Berger, Sherlock, Adair, Simone 2, Sigafoos, Rlnghofer, Rosen. Two-Base Hits Riddle, Rosen. Left on Bases Indianapolis, 3; Louisville, 6. Base on Balls Off Trout. 1. Struck Out By Lamaster, 2: by Page, 3: by Trout, 1; by Tinning, 1. Hits Off Page, 7 ln 3 Innings; off Trout, 4 In 2 Innings; off Tinning. 0 In 'A Inning. Htl by Pitcher By Trout. Rollings. Wild Pitch Trout. Losing Pitcher Page. Umpires-O'Brien and Guthrie. Time 1:33. TWO STREAKS END As Millers Twice Trim Brewers Eight Homers In First. Minneapolis, May 24 (AP) Minneapolis ended its four-game losing streak and at the same time stopped Milwaukee's winning string at five by winning both ends of today's double-header, the first game by 18-7 and the second 5-3. Eight home runs figured in the opener, with the Millers getting five of them. The second contest was a mound duel between Joe Heving of the visitors and Reggie Grabowski and Jake Baker of the home club, Grabowski going out for a pinch hitter in the seventh and getting credit for the victory when the Millers reached Heving for three runs. Two more runs in the eighth clinched the second victory. The Millers left tonight for Kansas City for a four-game series. (FIRST GAME.) MILWAUKEE. I MINNEAPOLIS. AB.H.PO.AIRyan.ss Morgan, rf 5 1 4 OIBrnwnc.rf WUburn.ss 5 2 4 3(',affke,cf Uhall.cf 6 0 2 (IHarrls,lf York. lb 2 2 11 1iHolland.3b Lsabs.lf 4 10 0lHauser,1b Htorll,3b 3 10 1Oeorge,c Brenzel.c 4 11 0Pfleger,2b Hope, 2b 4 0 2 IHTauscher.p Braxton. p 1 0 U II Bell.p 10 0 1 Totals Smllh 1 0 0 0! Totals 35 8 24 lol 45 24 27 13 Batted for Bell ln ninth. Innings.. 12345878V Milwaukee. 1000002047 Minneapolis 00171045 x 18 Errors Ryan 2, Holland 1. Runs Batted In Ryan 4, Brown 2, Harris 2, Holland 2, George, Pfleger 2, Tauscher 4, Wllburn 3, Morgan, York, Laabs. Two-Base Hits Tauscher 2, Gaffke, Harris. Home Runs Holland, Oeorge, Pfleger, Browne, Ryan, York, Wllburn, Laabs. Double Plays Pfleger to Ryan to Hauser, 2; Hope to Wllburn to York; York to Wllburn to York, Left On Bases Minneapolis, 6; Milwaukee, 5. Bases On Balls Off Tauscher, 4; off Bell, 3. Strike Outs By Tauscher, 2; by Bell, 1. Hits Off Braxton, 11 ln 3 innings: off Bell, 13 in 4 innings. Losing Pitcher Braxton. Wild Pitch Braxton. Umpires Dunn and Borskl. Time of Game 2:00. SMOM) AME MILWAUKEE. MINNEAPOLIS. AB.H.PO.AI AH.H.i'O.A Morgan, rf 5 1 1 1 3 OIRyan.ss Wllhrun.ss 4 01 Browne, rf OIGaffke.cf HHarrla.lf 0 Maimer, 1b 2 Holland, 3b llPflegcr,2b Uhalt.cf 2 3 1 11 1 1 1 1 n 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 York, lb Laabs. If Sl.ortl,3b Dickey, c Hope. 2 h Heving. p Smith 5Hargrave,0 1 TMcKaln 0! George, c Grah'ski,p 9 24 lOllArlett I Baker, p I Totals Tnials 34 7 27 10 Batted for Heving In ninth Inning. Ran for Hargrave ln seventh Inning. Batted for Grabowski In seventh inning. Innings... 1234587(9 Milwaukee.. 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 -3 Minneapolis. 00000032 x 6 Error Wllburn. Runs Batted In Ryan, Browne 2, Holland, Pfleger, Moran 2, Dickey. Two-Base Hits Gaffke, Hope. Stolen Bases Hauser, Morgan, Uhalt. Double Plays Pfleger to Ryan to Hauser; Holland to Pfleger to Hauser. Left on Bases Minneapolis, 7; Milwaukee, 8.- Hit by Pitcher By Heving, Hauser. Bases on Balls Off Grabowski, 2; off Baker, 2; off Heving, 4. Struck Out By Grabowski, 5; by Baker, 2; by Heving, 3. Hits Off Grabowski, 6 in 7 Innings; off Baker, 3 in 2 innings. Winning Pitcher Grabowski. Umpires Borskl and Dunn. Time TEN STARS ON ONE FARM. Ten of the greatest thoroughbred stallions in America are all at one breeding farm. Sir Gallahad III., Glalant Fox, Stimulus, Diavola, Reigh Count, Jacopo, Hard Tack, Gallant Sir, Sir Andrew and Alca zar are all standing at Arthur B, Hancoks's Clalrborne Stud in Ken tucky. ONLY ONE PRESIDENT. When the Thoroughbred Club of America was organized in Lexington, Ky., in 1932, Thomas Piatt, a leading breeder, was elected President. Since then the club has held four more elections and each time Mr. Piatt was reelected I I I i Taken By Columbus, Which Loses Final To Break Even On Day. Two Singles And Triple Clinch Opener For Birds Smoll Hurls Nightcap. Columbus, Ohio, May 24 (AP) The Columbus Red-Birds captured a four-game series with the Toledo Mud Hens by a three-to-one margin by splitting a double header with the visitors today. The Red Birds won the opener, 8 to 6, after twice overcoming Toledo leads, but faltered in the night cap, losing 6 to 1. Singles by Anderson and Owen, and a triple by Cullop off Paul Sullivan scored the deciding runs in the first game. Smoll pitched a smooth game in the night cap, allowing only five scattered hits, while his mates pounded Mort Cooper, Columbus hurler, for five hits and five runs in the fourth inning. FIRST GAME. TOLEDO. I COLUMBUS. AB.H.O.Ai AB.H.D.A Carson, cf Vtnc't,2b Dawls.lb Powers, it Oarback.c Leon'rd,lf Calvey.lf Ross, 3b Parker, ss Sullivan, p Thresh Thomas, p 2 12 0 Ak'man.ss 0 2 1 10 HBush,2b 2 And'aon.lf OlCullop.rf 0Lwen,c 0iG'rldge,3b 0Doljack,cI llMorgan,lb 5 Potter, p 4 1 Macon, p 0 2! Totals 0 0 Totals 35 6 24 15 Batted for Sullivan n eighth Inning. Innings ..1 23466789 Toledo 2 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 06 Columbus ..0 3022001 x 8 Errors Vincent, Powers, Parker, Auken-man 2, Owen. Runs Batted In Cullop, Owen, Doljack, Morgan 2, Potter, Powers, Garback 2, Sullivan. Two-Base Hits Owen, Morgan, Davis. Three-Base Hits Potter, Cullop. Home Run Sullivan. Stolen Base Garback. Sacrifice Morgan. Left on Bases Toledo, 7; Columbus, 6. Bases on Balls Off Sullivan, 3; ,pff Potter, 3; off Macon, 1; off Thomas, 1. Struck Out By Sullivan, 6; by Potter, 3; by Macon, 1. Hits Off Sullivan, 10 In 7 Innings; off Thomas, none in 1 Inning; off Potter, 5 in 6 innings; off Macon. 1 in 3 'A innings. Hit by Pitcher By Potter (Sullivan). Balk Macon. Passed Balls Garback. Winning Pitcher Potter. Losing Pitcher Sullivan. Umpires Rue and Kober. Time of Game 2:16. SECOND GAME. TOLEDO. COLUMBUS. AB.H.PO.A. AB.H.PO.A. arson, cf 4 O'Akenm'n.ss 4 Vincent,2b 5 Davls.lb 4 Powers, rf 5 Leonard.lf 5 2 Bush, 2b 3 1! Anderson, If 3 ill Cullop, rf JJwen.c l.Gut'dge,3b 4IDolJack,cf OlMorgan.lb liCooper.p -lChervlnko 9iCox,p Ross, 3b Parker, ss Linton, c Smoll, p Totals 40 13 27 0 0 0 0 iFisher Macon, p 0 0 Totals 30 5 27 8 tBatted for Cooper In sixth inning. t Batted for Cox in eighth inning. Innings... 123456789 Toledo 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 06 Columbus ..0 0 0001 0 0 0 1 Errors Ankenman 2. Runs Batted In Carson 2, Vincent 2, Davis 2, Collop. Two-Base Hit Powers. Home Runs Davis, Vincent. Double Plays Davis to Parker to Davis; Parker to Vincent to Davis; Bush to Ankenman to Morgan. Left on Bases Toledo, 9; Columbus, 4. Bases on Balls Off Smoll, 2; off Cooper, 2. Struck Out By Smoll, 4; by Cooper, 2; by Cox, 2; by Macon, 1.' Hits Off Cooper, 10 in 6 Innings; off Cox, 2 in 2 innings; off Macon, 1 in 1 inning. Losing Pitcher Cooper. Umpires Kober and Rue. Time of Game 1:54. TWO GAMES DROPPED By Saints As Streak Beaches tight Blues Are Victors. St. Paul, May 24 (AP) Kansas City handed St. Paul its eighth straight defeat by taking a double header, 3 to 1 and 9 to 4, today be fore a crowd of 8,500. Phil Page limited the Saints to seven hits in winning the opener. Carl Fischer, starting St. Paul hurler, was relieved in the second inning and was succeeded by Ira Hutchinson and Lou Fette Fette was charged with the de feat in the second game after a home run by pinch-hitter Bill Norman tied the score in the seventh inning and the Blues went on to win. It was the first day Norman had played since wrenching his knee ten days ago. Bill Shores, although taken out for a pinch hitter in the eighth, received credit for the second victory. A home run by Marty Hopkins with bases full in the ninth clinched the game for Kansas City, Bob Fenner, St. Paul catcher, was lost to the team for at least ten days when he received a split finger in the second game. FIRST GAME. KANSAS CITY. I ST, PAUL. AB.H.PO.A! AB.H.PO.A Marshall. ss 5 2 1 ? Warner, 2b 4 0 3 2 Breese.lf 4 3 1 0 Rosent'al.ef 4 0 4 0 Bocek.rr 5 15 Olsteinb'er.lf 3 2 2 1 Alex'er.lh 5 2 13 1 Boken.ss 4 2 2 3 Stumpf.cf 4 0 2 0 Todt.lb 4 Madjeskl.c 4 1 2 0iMcWlll's,3b 3 Hopklns.3b 4 3 1 1 Pasek.c 4 Schulte,2b 4 2 2 7 Koster.rf 3 Page.p 4 2 0 3 Flscher.p 0 IHutch'on.p 2 Totals 39 18 27 ISi'Norman 1 IFette.p 0 0 10 M 1 2 i 3 l n o o o Batted forHutchlnson in eighth. Innings.. .,123456789 Kansas City. 1 10 0 0 0 0 1 03 St. Psul ...00010000 01 Error Boken. Runs Batted In Bucek. Hopkins. Page, Pasek. Two-Base Hits--Hopkins. Hutchinson. Boken. Three-Bsse Hit Madjeskl. Sacrifice Breese. Double Plays Marshall to Schulte to Alexander; Alexander to Marshall to Alexander; Pasek to Boken: Warner to Boken to Todt. Wild Pitch Hutchinson. Left on Bas Kansas City, 10; 81. Paul, 6. Bass on Balls OK Page, 2. Struck Out By Page, 2; by Hutchinson, 2; by Fette, 1. Hits Off Fischer, 6 In 1 Innings; off Hutchinson, 9 in 6V5 Innings; off Fette 1 in 1 inning. Losing Pitcher Fischer. Umpires Swan-ion and Johnson. Time of Game 1:43. SECOND GAMB. KANSAS CITY. AB.H.PO.A ST. PAUL. AB.H.PO.A Warner,2b 4 12 2 M'rshall.sa 4 14 3 Stumpf.cf 5 1 1 9 1 Ros'thal.cf 4 Stelnb'er.lf 3 March'd.rr 4 Alex'd'r.lb 4 French, lb 0 Bocek.lf 4 Madjeskl.c 3 Hopkins, 3b 4 Schulte,2b 2 Shores, p 3 M'Cull'ch 1 Nlg'ellng.p 1 1 Boken.ss 3 OTodt.lb 4 3 0 M'Wl'ms,3b 4 5 1 Fenner.c 1 lPask,c 1 6 Koster.rf 1 ,3i Spencer.p 0 OIRIgney.p 0 OltNorman IFette.p Totals 35 10 27 14 Totals 34 8 27 13 Batted for Shores in eighth Inning, tBatted for Rlgney in seventh Inning. Innlnes .123456789 Kansas City 30100001 49 St. Paul ...1 0000120 0-4 Errors Boken, Jasek, McWIlliams, Runs Batted In Marshall. Alexander. Bo- cek, Hopkins 5. Rosenthal, Tfdt, Norman 2. Two-Base Hits Hiumpi, AiaajesKi, Aiex ander, Boken. Home Runs Hopkins, Rosenthal. Norman. Sacrifices Hopkins fcchulte. Stolen Bases S'hulte 2. Leu on Banes Kansas City, 10; St. Paul, 6. Bases on Balls Off Snores, 1; off Niggcl-Ing, 1; off Spencer, 1; off Rigney. nil Fette, 2. Struck Out By Shores, 4: bv Nlggerllng, 1: by Rlgney, 5. Hits Off Shores, 8 in 7 innlngss; off Nlggellng, none In 2 innings; off Spencer, 3 in W Inning: off Rlgney, 3 in 8 Innings; off fette, 4 In 2 innings. Winning Pitcher Learned yesterday that Our Reds are angling for the services of.', "Ripper" Collins, veteran first sacker of the St. Louis Cardinals. Collins has been riding the "wood"' since Johnny Mize took over the Initial hassock duties several weeks ago. Johnny Fischer's ' Cincinnati's young Walker Cupper, informed . Sparks last night that he positively ' would compete in the men's city ; amateur championship at the Terrace Park Country Club next -month, unless the strenuous first-year law exams at the University ' of Cincinnati takes too much out '-of him during the next 10 days. " Long John hasn't hit a shct for 10 days, having devoted all his"' time to studying. He is 12 pounds underweight, and fears that if he"5 loses any more weight he won't bo able to withstand the strain of an entire week's play under a boiling June sun. Contrary to the opinion of some?., wiseacres, there is absolutely no., "highhatishness" in Long John's makeup. He isn't afraid of losing' any prestige by dropping the derl, cision to some unknown in the city classic. Fischer has been playin golf long enough to know that even., a Sarazen or a Hagen can be., "knocked off" by some unknown" in an 18-hole match. Fischer also appreciates the great , match-play ability of such golfer as Neil Ransick, city and state ama " teur champion; Milt Cook, three-" time city amateur champion; Allen Joslin, Jr., Doug Hill, Don Gill, Milt Schloss, Wally Chadwell, and a host'1 of up-and-coming young stars. And" also realizes that nothing will tend to sharpen his competitive blade more for the coming Walker Cup '' matches and the national amateur than to cross niblicks with the besth in this district. Our guess is that Long John will " be on the "firing line" in both the, city title chase and the Kentucky State amateur at Summit Hills" Country Club the week following" the city. 'j Herr Maxie Schmeling says that Young Stribling gave him his tough-. est fight. Which means that Nazi . Max has somehting to look forward to on June 18. This column has a pet peeve, sev- eral of them in fact. To give this one its proper place it will be desig-'. nated as Pet Peeve No. 1. It is directed at those golfers who, persist in drawing lines on the put- . ting greens with their fingers. They do this when they lift a ball that Is in another player's way. Sometimes they claw the greens'1' so violently as a man scratching the seven-year itch. And there are those who apparently figure theyi" can't dig deep enough with their' fingers so they use one of those sharp-pointed tees. One line or a mark isn't enough- for some players. They must drav? two, making either a dagger or an "x" to mark the spot where the J" ball rested before it was lifted. t As a result greens often are so marked and scarred after a heavy ' day's play that persons not wise to the ways of golfers might figure ' somebody was trying to draw maps I or pictures on the greens. 1 Generally the fellows who com- -t plain the loudest about the condi- 1 tions of the greens, the tiny weeds ! and foreign grasses in them, are the worst offenders. They don't seem ' to realize that the marks often handicap the players following them and that it may be several . weeks before the marks heal. Considerate golfers when they must lift a ball, will place a small ' coin, blade of grass or cigarette i ashes. It's even better to guess at the spot than draw those lines. WAS PEPPER'S PAN BED? After losing a close game to the New York Giants on the recent , Eastern trip, Pepper Martin and Dizzy Dean decided to have a little fun at the expense of Branch Rickey, Vice President and General . Manager of the Gas House Gang. Pepper called Rickey shortly after midnight, placing a piece of paper over the mouthpiece to dis- guise his voice. He announced him- self as a New Tork newspaperman and asked Mr. Rickey his opinion . of the ball game. "I'll be frank about it," said J Rickey, "we lost the ball -game be- cause of the stupidity of Pepper . Martin. If he had an ounce of brains to guide that ton of muscle J he carts around, we would have . won quite handily. Is that all.'" According to the great Dizzy, -Pepper lost his power of speech and dropped the receiver, According to information received by this column, two members of t the English Walker Cup team are newspapermen. Sam McKlnley and Jock McLean are the two Scots 't who eke out a living dashing out obits and chasing ambulances and patrol wagons. Both are rated as ' excellent golfers. It Is rather hard to believe that . a couple of typewriter athletes are good enough to make any golf team. Newspapermen are usually notoriously poor golfers. Some of e them have been playing golf more J than a dozen years and still celc- 3 brate by getting "high" every time J they crack the century mark. i MINOR GAMES. SPICUI. DISr-ATCH TO THE KSQU1RKR. Port Clinton, Ohio, May 24 Port Clinton Standard Products, 10 runs, J 14 hits, 5 errors; Bellevue, 7 runs, j 9 hits, 5 errors, in a Northwestern Ohio League game today. I 1,959 ACRES FOR HORSES. At Clalrborne Stud in Bourbon , County, Kentucky, owned by Arthur B. Hancock, 1,959 acres or line j . . . ' bluegrass land In devoted exclu- f I g(vev t,0 the breeding and ralsinjr-i ,i.tlhj hnrsa X thoroughbred Horse. i Dog Oval Opens Wednesday; Improvements Made At Track Morris Shreimer celebrated his winner in 1928 and a&ain ln 1933' seventy-second birthday by carding and Deacon Litz of DuBois, Pa., an 86 at Ridgewood. . . . Congrat-! are among those expected to ulations, Mr. Shreimer! . . . Major j qualify tomorrow. S. E. Wolfe, Veterans' champion, of Both Litz and Meyer have had Greater Cincinnati, was a visitor in , one of the three chances allotted. Cincinnati over the week-end. The : Litz registered a 115-mile-an-hour Major played at Kenwood. He is ! average for the 25-mile qualifying now a resident of St. Louis. . . . distance, but used a quart more Winners in the selected 12-hole j gasoline than the two-and-one-half-tournament at Hyde Park: M. ! gallon minimum. Meyer quit when sion did not start until 10:10 a. m. Mountain made the unusual time, for a recreational -walker, of six hours, three minutes, and two-fifths of a second. Conrad T. Kraeger and P. W. Bohnert of Cincinnati, Miss Claire Windsor and Miss Margaret Harris of the Canadian Army and Navy Vets of Hamilton, Ontario, who finished after Mountain in the order named, also had reached the finish line before Crosbie, the first of the competitive walkers, arrived. The German American Athletic Club of New York City won the team championship trophy awarded to the three-man team with the lowest number of points according to position of the men at the finish. The fust Cincinnatian to finish was Irwin J. Carroll, who came in eleventh. C. Watson Hover, President of the Junior Chamber of Commerce, sponsors of the event, was announcer, keeping the large crowd attending the finish of the race informed as to the status of the contestants. Harry C. Wallace, General Chairman of the event, and Harry E. Wessling, President of the Ohio A. A. U. Officials' Association, who was in charge of the judging, received many compliments upon the success of the contest. Walk. May 24. Time made In Competitive Event. residence. Hrs Minn Hepa Detroit, Mich 5 Lowell, Mass 5 New York City s Pittsburgh, Pa 5 Toronto, Ont 8 Forest Hills, Mass 5 Baltimore, Md s New York, N. Y.., S Los Angeles 6 Los Angeles 5 Cincinnati 6 West Roxbury, Mass s Eliza beih, N. J .1 Cincinnati 5 Kecne. N. H S Cincinnati 8 Cincinnati 6 New York, N. Y 6 Hamilton, Ontario 8 Cincir.nantl Hamilton, Ontario Chicago, 111 Bethel,, Ohio Los Angeles Calif Pittsburgh, Pa 16 18 18 19 19 23 27 28 34 36 38 38 40 42 fit) M 83 1 4 6 55 50 51 37 3814 3Hi 20 32.4 38.4 58 17 112 28 12 25.4 12 20 26 the north end of the track between the lacing strip arid the paddock. All grandstand seats have been painted Improvements were made by Robert Williams, noted greyhound race track builder, under the supervision of Walter T. Askew, Executive Secretary of the club. During the winter, Askew visited the West Flagler track in Miami, which is regarded as the last word in dog tracks. He instructed Williams to pattern the track after West Flagler. John W. Masner, who headed the track last year, again will be the general manager. Masner is one of the best managers in the country, and he declared last night that the track plans the beat greyhound racing ever staged in this section. Among the famous kennels that Blair has signed are Ostendorf's, Whitehead's, McCarthy's, Wolf's, Falk's, Weron's, David's, Boyd's, Burnett's, Peasely's, My Favorite, Kaley's, De'Geer, and others. Al Mescher, well-known Cincinnatian, will manage the mutual department. Melscher is one of the outstanding mutual managers. Ten races will be run each niht instead of 11 as last year. Schooling races will be held tonight. JACK W00D WINNER At Waverly Regatta Cousin To Detroit Veteran. Waverly, Ohio, May 24 (AP) Crowds massed along the shores of Lake White today to watch a score of motor boat pilots compete in a four-event race program featured by a return to competition of Jack Wood of Detroit, a cousin of Gar Wood, veteran boat builder. Wood won one of the four events and was second in another. Officials of the Mid-East Outboard Association, which sponsored the races, said 30,000 spectators paid admissions. Results of the four five-mile events: Class A (12 horsepower) Carl Stoner of New Baltimore, Ohio, first; Joe Roch of Cleveland, second; Melvin Pohle of Columbus, third. Time 5:25.8. Class B (16 horsepower) Milford Harrison of Vermillion, first; Jack Wood of Detroit, second; Ott Reagel of Findlay, third. Time 5:00.9. Class C (24 to 30 horsepower) Wood, first; Harrison, second; Reagel, third. Time 4:50.5. Class D (Free-For-All, Maximum 60 horsepower) Bernard Weaver of Fort Wayne, Ind first; Ken Frank of Cleveland, second; Reagel, third. Time 4:42. Wood was injured during speed trials at Chicago three years ago, and was forced by his injuries to retire temporarily from racing. He said the Lake White course was one of the finest in the Middle West SPEED TRIALS Prevented By Rain, But Speedway Drys Sufficiently For Several To Drive At Low Speed. Indianapolis, May 24 (AP) Rain prevented any qualifying trials for the 500-mile Memorial Day automobile race today, but the speedway surface did dry sufficiently for several drivers to make practice runs at low speed. Mauri Rose of Dayton, Ohio, who cracked up his four-wheel drive car a week ago, had it out today for the first time since the mishap. Trials will be resumed tomorrow. Henry MacQuinn of Indianapolis, Louis Meyer of Huntington, Calif., the motor of his car failed to per form to his satisfaction. Twenty-five drivers have already qualified, leaving eight places open in the starting' list. Approximately 18 cars are being groomed for chances at the remaining assignments. Officials of the Borg-Warner Corporation presented to Captain E. V. Rickenbarker, President of the Speedway Corporation, a silver trophy valued at $10,000, which will become the permanent possession of the Speedway. Cast In metal and surmounting the trophy are likenesses of the heads of the 23 drivers who have won the Memorial Day race. THREE GAMES TONIGHT. Ohio Valley Flood Light League i teams which play its games at Taft Field, will play their second round j of games tonignt, starting at i :)) o'clock. In the opening contest, the H. H. Meyer Packing House team will clash with the Delaney Wood Heels. Delaney lost a 1 to 0 decision its first time out. Second contest, will bring together the F. H. Lawson nine and Schroth Packing. In the final game, two teams that have not been scored on will clash. The Pure Oil Peps will tangle with the Cincinnati Coffin Company. Hank McMurray, hurler for the Pure Oil team, will attempt to repeat his no-hit performance of the cpening game. MATCH STRIKE SETTLED. Akron, Ohio, May 24 (AP) Union employees of the Palmer Match Company today voted 4 to 1 to return to work, ending a controversy which has kept the plant closed since March 4. Announcement of the vote was made by Donald David, President of the United Match Workers Federal Labor Union, who said the workers would return under the same wage scale. About 450 are affected by the settlement, many of them women employees. The union demanded a wage increase. FIRE DESTROYS CLUB. Parkersburg, W. Va., May 24 (AP) Fire destroyed the Parkers burg Country Club house today. Officials estimated the loss at $25,-000. They said the blaze apparently was started by defective wiring. The clubhouse was built in 1903. Greyhound racing returns to the Harrison track, located on Route i 62, Wednesday night. The track is one of the most beautiful in the United States. More than $12,000 has been spent in improvements. The entire plant has been painted white and trimmed in red. A ramp with a twenty-degree slope has been installed so that (those who prefer to stand, while viewing the racing, may have a clear view of the track. This ramp, as well as all other parts of the grounds where the spectators stand, has been covered with asphalt. The old wooden cyclone rail has been replaced by an artistic iron fence. Along the fence and across the track flowers and shrubbery have been planted. The judges' stand has been changed. The presiding judge's stand has been changed to one of wrought iron and glass. An odds board, 54 feet long and SO feet high, visible from all parts of the track has been erected on Should Know! Columbus Ohio, May 24 (AP) Larry Snyder, Ohio State track coach, said today that Jesse Owens, In winning the low hurdles in the Big Ten meet yesterday in 23.5 seconds, nine -tenths of a second slower than the world record he set a year ago, "ran the greatest race of his career." The dusky speed king missed his stride at the start and had to put his left foot ovfer the first hurdle. He tried to make up a stride between the first and second, missed, and splintered the top bar. Still off balance as he reached the third hurdle he splintered it into three sections, hut stayed on his feet. Snyder estimated that at that point Owens was last by six yards and almost ten yards behind the leaders. Then Owens kicked into his regular stride and cut down on the other five to win by two feet. Frishkorn, T. O. McLoughlin, M. A Williams, Judge John Druffel, Stanley Hennegan, Paul Hennegan, E. K. Wuerdeman and C. J. Ratter-man. . . . M. C. Farrell defeated Ernie Wrampelmeier, 3 and 2 and A. R. Groenke beat C. H. Davis, 2 and 1 in the semi-final round for the Vice President's trophy at Kenwood. Golfing members of the Traffic Club will gather at Ridgewood Club this afternoon. . . . C. H. Langley nudged the egglet 30 times to win the putting tournament at the Highland Club, while Joe Hales won the match play against par, finishing three up. Doubles Title Taken By Bearcat Netmen Gambier, Ohio, May 24 Ed Fox, Ohio intercollegiate tennis champ from the University of Cincinnati, paired with Louis Zimov today to wrest the intercollegiate doubles title from Bill Wolf and Henry Dc-bussey of Marietta, 86, 63, 06, 5 7, 86. At the end of the five gruelling sets on the Kenyon College courts, Fox had to ask the first name of his partner, who heretofore has been on Cincinnati's No. 2 team. Judges and spectators described the team work of the two almost total strangers as phenomenal. Fox took the singles crown Saturday, defeating Bill Turner of Kenyon, 86, 60, 6 8, 6 4, in a three-hour match. In the doubles semi-finals, Wolf and Debussey beat Howenstine and Pfshischeck of Miami, 46, 86, 75, 63, 62, while Zimov and Fox were eliminating Wooton and Cummings of Denison, 6 3, 6 4, 6 3. WABASH HI TEAM WINS. Wabash, Ind May 24 (AP) Wabash narrowly outpointed Warsaw yesterday to win the track championship of the Central Indiana High School Conference. Wa bash scored 52 7-10 points, compared with Warsaw's 49', i. Other scores follow: Noblesville, ZVi: Rochester, 2011-30; Tipton, 14; Plymouth, 111-15; Huntington, 11, and Alexandria, 4 2-10. Warsaw and Huntington tied for the championship last year,

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the The Cincinnati Enquirer
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free