The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on June 3, 1965 · Page 10
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 10

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Algona, Iowa
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Thursday, June 3, 1965
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Page 10
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6—AI0ona (la.) Upper Det Moln*i Thurtday, June 3, 1965 ^^_ d ^ Ku ^^ b __^_^^ Ku ^^ B .^^ ku ^^ u ^^t_di^hi^i^^a^*^A ^^H^^^^^^^^I^^^^^^^^H^^^^IH^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^HI^^^H^^^HH ^•^^•^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^•^^i^^^^^™ "• ' FROM THE ATTIC... ... TO THE VAULT (Your Hebby - And Y6ur N«l§hb0f'») By Dick Palm»r The Belmond Collectors Club will host a coin show Sunday afternoon, June 20, at the Belmond high school Student Center, located in the northeast part of town. Doors will open to the public at 12:30. There will lie a dealers' bourse and many interesting exhibits with no admission charge. This may be the last area show before the fall season, so mark your claender. - o - There is still time to send a card for this column's anniversary number two drawing. My pre-trip columns will deal with some of the questions received, but one merits Immediate comment. Meg E. Schneider inquires about the fiscal and monetary policies of Tibetaji mon- estaries. It is tragic that such a weighty problem must burden one so young. 1, too, Meg, have been disturbed about this obvious gap In the education of our young people. Fortunately, the same nice Daddy that helped you write your card can come to our mutual aid for, as the major team Instructor in World History, he is ever alert to the many unexplored problems of far off lands which so vitally effect our destiny. This column will serve as a directive for an immediate research project and I am certain that by the time you reach the 10th grade, an appropriate lecture will be forthcoming. I do hope that I am around to hear it. I would observe, however, that since the Red Chinese are presently holding Tibet, I suspect that the monks are more concerned with survival than money. - o - An American business man in Kuwait reports on how seriously the Arab League countries take their nbn- recognition of Israel. He ordered a Mlnkus Mr. Mlnkus Is Jewish - catalog and It was delivered torn to pieces. All stamp, coin, and news magazines such as Time are carefully examined and any references to Israel are cut out. The Scott catalog had the Israel section deleted. All of this Is reported in that most interesting of house organs, the Outburst, published several times a y«?ar by Herman Herst Jr., Slinib Oak, New York, one of the world's top stamp dealers. Pat goes on, however, to note a few things about our own postal policy and 1 would like to quote him directly. "But thanks to a rather silly law that Congress passed not too long ago, every couple of weeks the post office sends me a form letter (Pat subscribes to a Russian publication called Moscow News).Tliey want to know if 1 know that I am getting Communist literature and whether 1 actually want it. Of course, I know. 1 subscribed to it. Of course, what Congress wants is for me not to fill in the form, in which case this week's Moscow News will be burned. But then there is next week's, and the week after that and so on. In fact, I strongly suspect that there is one man In the New York post office who sits at a desk waiting for my copy to come in each week so he can send me his friendly form letter (which required no postage). Then he sits back and waits a few days for my reply (which requires no postage). Today two form letters came in at one time. That means my friend who is safe-guarding my morals, lest I succumb to Communist propaganda, will have nothing to do for two weeks. Isn't this ridiculous? Bear in mind that this applies to every publication from Russia, those destined for scientists, institutions of higher learning, industrial concerns, government agencies, libraries and the like. Just how many post office employees are * spending all of their working hours protecting Americans from this so-called literature no one seems to know, but this certainly must be a factor in the so- called post office deficit we keep hearing about." - o - Thanks, Pat. I knew that such a law had been passed to check on unsolicited material sent from Russia, but 1 had no idea that it pertained to publications by subscription or that it was necessary to reaffirm every time a new issue arrived. You might address your unknown postal correspondent in New York as "comrade" and really shake things up. - o In a previous column, I commented about the stamp racket relative to the death of President Kennedy. Pat also rises to do battle and again I quote: " Princess Grace and her royal spouse should do handsomely on Kennedy's death. In an effort to assure that every collector in the world can afford to buy a Kennedy stamp, the price was kept low. It is only 28 cents. But if you want to show your grief for Kennedy more substantially, you can buy the same stamp imperforate for only $36. But that is not all. The Kennedy brew has been sweetened with a souvenir sheet for only $57. But what good is just one souvenir sheet when it comes both perforated andimperforate?That will cost another $57." - o - Well spoken. A so-called complete coverage of Kennedy stamp issues now comes to some $450 to $500. Really legitimate issues would reduce the total to about $100. Yet someone must buy or these "garbage" issues would soon cease. It is a pity that hobbies are sometimes exploited and an even greater pity that the collectors involved allow it to happen. Francis Lieb Is Graduate Of Concordia College Francis Lieb son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Lieb of Algona, la. and attending Concordia College, St. Paul, Minnesota, has been announced as an Honor Student who graduated from Concordia's Ministerial program at the annual Spring Commencement, June 5, 19Q5., Summa cum Laude with "a Associate of Arts Degree. Harlan Wlttkopf, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Wittkopf presently attending Concordia Academy, has received the distinction of being included on the Honor Roll for the 1964-65 school year. He is a senior at the Academy. PRINTING THAT PULLS and does justice to your business, fairly priced. Upper Des Molnes Mary Hudspeth Will Wed Sept. 4 Eat Out Often In ALGONA VAN'S CAFE JCT. HIWAYS 18-169 OPEN WEEKDAYS 10A.M.-1 A.M. SUNDAYS 8A.M.- 1 A.M. CLOSED MONDAYS PRIVATE DINING ROOM BLUE & WHITE CAFE CARL NELSON, Owner FEATURING: ORDERS TO GO HOME-COOKED MEALS SANDWICHES - SHORT ORDERS OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY 7 Days A Wok Air Conditioned CHARLIE'S SUPPER CLUB SO. ON 169 DINING ROOM OPEN 5:30-11:30 P. M. COCKTAILS LIVE ENTERTAINMENT PRIVATE DINING ROOM Ttl«. 295-9152 CHROME CAFE JCT. 18 • 169 BROASTED CHICKEN OUR SPECIALTY OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY Clwd Sot. 2 P. M. - Sun. 5 P. M. HOTEL ALGONA COFFEE SHOP HOME OF THE VIENNA SANDWICH & FULL 1 POUND PORTERHOUSE STEAK OPEN Mon. - Frl. 6 A. M. - 9 P. M. Sat. A Sun. OPEN 7 A.M. THE JOHNSON HOUSE ON SO. PHILLIPS SMORGASBORD EVERY NOON A FRIDAY NITE PRIVATE DINING ROOMS SEPARATE COCKTAIL LOUNGE CLOSED SATURDAYS (Exctpt For Private Parti«) Mr. and Mrs. Worth Huds- petli, St. Benedict, announce the engagement of their daughter, Mary Joyce, to Darrell Gene Rol«rts, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Roberts, Bessemer, Michigan. Miss Hudspeth is a graduate of Klmore High School. Mr. Roberts a graduate of Bessemer high school. Both are employed by the Allen-Bradley Company of Milwaukee. A September 4th wedding Is planned. New Manager James Kollasch became manager of the Hobarton branch ol the Whittemore Co-op Elevator June 1, according to an announcement by Larry Twedt, manager of the home elevator. Dale Cole has been manager of the Hobarton branch. 68TH Mr. and Mrs. George Baker, Sr., recently celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary. They are residing in a nursing home in Hartley. Several Sets Cousins Are S-City Gratis SWEA-EAGLE - It has been noted that there are six pairs of cousins In the senior class this year, with many other cousins once or twice removed. Paul and Petrea Thoreson, son of the Cecil Thoresons and daughter of the Orville Thoresons; Danny Anderson, son of the Albert Andersons, and Marjorie Lee Tobtn, daughter of the Johnle Toblns; Reid and Roger Farland, sons of the late Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Farland and Ed Farland and the late Mrs. Farland, respectively; Robert Johnson, son of the Fred Johnsons and Kay Johnson, daughter of the Lamont Johnsons; Johnle O'Green, son of the Richard O'- Greens, andBonltaO'Green, daughter of the Walter O'Greens; and Claude Haag, son of the Claude Haags and Rodney Smith, son of the Clifford Smiths. - o - Mr. and Mrs. Ed Godfredson and family were Sunday visitors at the home of her parents, the Henry Hoppes at Fairmont. A wedding of Interest to many area people took place Saturday at Buffalo Center, when Leah Rae Orthel and Carl D. Nelson exchanged marriage vows. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Orthel, Buffalo Center, and the groom son of Mrs. Charles Nelson and the late Mr. Nelson, Mason City, is a great- nephew of Mrs. Ida O'Green. Attending from this area were Mrs. O'Green and Harold, Mrs. Gust Larson and Richard, the Harry Larsons, Gunnard Larsons, Mrs. Andrew Larson, Mr. and Mrs. Vic Proknik of Fairmont, the Walter O'Greens, Richard O'Greens, Mrs. Orrin Smith, Palo Alto, Calif., and the groom's grandmother, Grandma Nelson of Armstrong, who is 96 years of age. Mrs. Gust Larson was honored guest for her birthday Thursday at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. Woodward Helmersat Armstrong. Guests Included Mrs. Larson, Mrs. Ida O'Green, Mrs. Andrew Larson, Mrs. Clarence Fosllng, Fairmont, Mrs.Gunnard Larson, Mrs. Vic Proknik, Fairmont, Mrs. Harry Larson, Mrs. Laverne Larson and Mrs. Leonard Larson. Mrs. Joe Preston and Mrs. Nina Traub attended baccalaureate at Esthervllle for Janet Anderson, daughter of the Kenneth Andersons. Mrs. Preton reports that Janet was awarded a scholarship for one term at Estherville junior college from Morrell Packing plant, in addition to the scholarship she won previously for one semester from the Estherville Women's Society. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Preston and Mrs. Joe Preston and her sister, Mrs. Nina Traub, plan to attend the graduation of Mrs. Joe Preston's granddaughter, Marilyn Nelson, daughter of the Alfred Nelson's, at Henry, 111. Friday evening. Jerry Anderson was host to young school mates In his room at Grant school Wednesday for his birthday. The children gathered at the Albert Anderson home for games and refreshments and brought Jerry many gifts. Guests were Patty Pedersen, Dawn Clow, Karen Quam, Kristi Mlno, Lori Work, Valerie Farrow, Monica Haag, Julie Tokheim, Vlckl Richardson, Alan Eisenmann, Brian Farrow, Joel Stevens, Dennis Richardson, Eddie Payne, Robert Briggs, Clark Patterson and their teacher, Miss Trenary. Receptions and parties were held at homes of Swea City seniors after baccalaureate Sunday evening. For Howard Person at the O. R. Person home; at the Orville Thoreson home for Petrea; at the Cecil Thoreson home for Paul; at the Albert Anderson home for Danny; at the Johnle Tobin home for Marjorie Lee. Betty Clark and Marlene Belthius were weekend guests at the home of Betty's parents, the Glen Clarks. Ron Anderson had the misfortune of falling from a pony last week at home and fracturing a bone In his right arm. He is the small son of the Robert Anderson's. Ron's brother Paul broke an arm In February and again this spring had the misfortune of breaking the same arm. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Carr and Maurice were Sunday dinner guests at the O. B. Koons home at Lakota. The Don Koons of Estherville were other guests. The Harold Carrs attended baccalaureate at ArmstrongSun- day evening for Dorene Reding and were coffee guests at the Lawrence Reding home. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Carr attended baptism services for their granddaughter, Ann Marie, who was born May 4, and were dinner guests at the home of the baby's parents, the Keith Poshustas. Tne Poshustas have another daughter, Donna Marie. Mrs. Orville Budach and Paul of Blue Earth, and Mrs. Harold Carr called on Mrs. Donald Koons, Estherville, last Monday. Mr. and Mrs. William Gles and the Eldon Links attended baccalaureate at Humboldt Sunday evening. — G/ve Your Son a Head Start on lifolotiK flimiu'iiil mu'urity through life inminuuv. (let (lit* faclH on the Policy I'urchiiw* Option from LOUIS H. WILLY BOfll NEW YORK LUe Iniuranw Orouo U If A H C t CO:M P A!N Y IHMTMW • Annultw* "Did you hear about Ruby?... "Ever since she painted her walls with new DA-TEX, she simply can't talk about anything else!" You'll rave about one-coat vinyl DA-TEX, too. It's unlike any latex paint you have ever used. Developed by Davis Paint Company and advertised in LIFE magazine, .DA-TEX rolls or brushes on smoothly. If you touch up later it shows no laps or telltale traces.' The reason? It's Densi-tized. New DA-TEX has a heavier body. You get less drip, less spatter. Dries in 23 minutes. No painty odor. Choose from this year's newest colors at Sailer's Davis Paint Store, Algona, Iowa. ANIUAL MEETIIB ••1(4 OF THE Humboldt County C MIICA ifinjuiiuvii'JVi Ail vr Tfr' *".vr* * •"-"•-"•-"""--"""••" RURAL ELECTRIC CO-OP WILL BE HELD Tuesday, June 8,1965 AT THE New Humboldt High School Gymnasium Doors open 6:30 P.M. Meeting will start at 7:30 p.m. We will be looking for you. _ — — • .^^fc^^^^—^^^^-^^fc^-^^^^-^^^-^fc^-^^^-^fc—^^^^•^*-^^^^*^^^*^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^•^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^•^^^•^ 9 DOOR PRIZES WILL BE GIVEN 1-ELECTRIC CLOTHES DRYER 1-ELECTRIC WATER HEATER 1-T.V. SET 1-HUMIDIFIER 2-BENCH GRINDERS 1-SOCKET WRENCH SET 1-ELECTRIC BLANKET 1-FRY PAN MEMBERS ONLY ARE ELIGIBLE TO WIN) •*•(» Tin-re will be the reports of the officers and manager. The election of three Directors by vote of members present. Proposed chances in Articles of Incorporation and liy Laws. •«I»*^J<»*I^^^«^'«M*'**»'^'«*^^ WE WILL HAVE ENTERTAINMENT THAT ALL SHOULD ENJOY. r*^^^*^^*^**^****^*** 11 '*******' This is your Cooperative — Attend this meeting Coffee & Donuts after meeting. HUMBOLDT COUNTY RURU ELECTRIC CO-OPERATIVE J'hom- :}£2-nur> • On Broadway - Humboldt, Iowa V, IT w »PTf'fTVTl' r»l« I'!' I»!' I 'inPfTtTTTinf

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