The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on March 11, 1965 · Page 16
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 16

Publication:
Location:
Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Thursday, March 11, 1965
Page:
Page 16
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GET THAT EXTRA $20.00 PER ACRE A most interesting program is being presented throughout the Corn-Soybean belt this winter. As you will see from the front page, it will appear in this area soon. Corn and Soybean Clinic, it's called. The goal is ambitious—to give in one short day a complete rundown on the latest moneymaking practices in corn and soybean production. Farmer meetings have long been a favorite winter sport—thousands of them every year, sponsored by extension, suppliers and dealers. Many of these meetings provide valuable information. Others just peck at the problem, some get too busy with commercials. There is a need for fewer, bigger and better farmer meetings, thoroughly covering a limited subject. Corn and Soybean Clinic attempts to do this, to run the entire gamut of profitable corn and soybean production—giving information on the latest in soil management, hybrid seed, pre-emergence weed control, custom built fertilizers, soil insecticides, and the most effective machinery to use in planting and harvesting. We have all heard too many times that old joke about the farmer not farming half as well as he knows how. It is not nearly as true as it used to be, because farming today is such a deadly competitive business. You either keep up or you're through. University people used to say, and some still say, it takes seven years to get acceptance of a new recommended practice. Some farmers will say they are actually ahead of the educators. Yet it is true that all but a few farmers can greatly increase their profit by doing things very much within their reach. Corn and Soybean Clinic claims that, given enough information about the operation of the average good corn and soybean producer, the experts can usually show him how to increase his net income by at least $20 per acre. Building up yields was once thought to be a slow process, but today you can get the effect (more income) almost at once—like "instant coffee." CAN IT BE DONE? EXPERTS SAY, "YOU BET/" A modern corn growing system can Early Planting Narrow rows Improved varieties High population High fertilization Pre-emergence weed control, little or no cultivation Early harvest Combining over picking Control soil insects offer these additions in bushels per acre. +3 (better use of season, avoidance of drought) +10 (conserves moisture, better use of light) +5 (more vigor, resistance, fewer dropped ears) +3 (up to maximum) +10 (more balanced nutrients) +5 (no root pruning, no loss of stand) +5 (cuts down losses) +7 (cuts down losses) +5 (of course, where infestation is heavy, saving much higher) At the New Melleray Abbey farm near Dubuque, Iowa/ a yield of 128 bushels in 1964 resulted from following most of the practices described. This was in spite of a severe drought. There is some duplication in the list and weather conditions will affect results but most of these increases are reasonably proven possibilities, if the various jobs are done right. Improvements in soybean production during the last few years have been even more spectacular than in corn. Not long ago 25 to 30 bushels per acre was accepted as about all we could hope for. Now, thanks mostly to chemical weed control, this yield barrier is being broken time after time and 50-bushel soybean yields are coming very much into the picture. Soybean producers who are serious about boosting their per acre yield are careful to use top quality seed varieties properly suited to the day length for their latitude, plus the most advanced management practices. New developments on these factors are on the way. To date, however, pre-emergence weed control is responsible for most of the rapid increase in soybean production.

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