Detroit Free Press from Detroit, Michigan on May 3, 1964 · Page 22
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Detroit Free Press from Detroit, Michigan · Page 22

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Detroit, Michigan
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Sunday, May 3, 1964
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Page 22
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6-B Sunday, May 3, '64 " UJUmaj -gMkxf "WW 1 w Hedda Hopper's Debbie And BY HEDDA HOPPER Fr PreM HollywMd CMTMPondcnt HOLLYWOOD Debbie Reynolds came to our first' interview in three years wearing boxing gloves, but with an olive branch tucked up her sleeve. Being an outspoken little doll, she stated her case abruptly and effec tively: "You've been mad at me for four years. Don't you think it's time you got off my back? Every time . you see me you look through me. You know I've always liked you I like direct people what's the matter?" I ADMITTED I'd raised cain about her getting the leading role in the movie version of the stage musical, "The Unsinkable Molly Brown," and confessed I'd have to eat my words, but she moved in past my defense. (The movie will premiere in Detroit July 1.) "All of a sudden you didn't like me because you saw someone else in the part . . ." (Tammy Grimes played the role of Molly on Broadway.) I said: "I figured It should be a big woman." But she ignored that. 1 HOPE you'll see the picture and let me know what you think of my performance," Debbie said. "Not as a columnist, but as a friend. Criticism never hurts anybody if it's done in the right way. "But you Jumped to conclusions and said, 'If I ever saw anyone wrong for "Molly Brown" it's Debbie Reynolds. When that round was over I told her, "I understand you had to fight to go out and sell the picture because the studio wouldn't pay expenses." Debbie disagreed, and said she never wanted Metro -Gold-wyn-Mayer to pay for her pro-motional tour because she'd wanted the part and felt she was lucky to get it. "IF I BELIEVE in something, I'll go all-out to prove it. That goes for my personal life, my charity work for the Girl Scouts, and my career. "I believed I could play Molly Brown since I saw the play four years ago. I felt in a way, I was a lot like her, bat many people don't know me well enough to understand that. "I never worked harder In my life than I worked on that picture. We had a beautiful script from Helen Deutsch a love story with music, not just another musical. It's the sort of picture that will sustain itself for years, like 'Singin' in the Rain' or 'LAli.' "I volunteered my time to sell the picture for a month because I believe everyone involved in a picture today must help sell it . . . not only actors, but producer, director, etc. Whoever can give the time." DEBBIE had been shopping for clothes to wear in New York at the stockholders preview of the movie and a party 1atr anrl uaa smartlv rtrpsspfi in a blue sheath with matching jacked and a lovely fur hat. She had not asked the studio to pay for her clothes, her point? of view being that she . can afford to buy them and the money saved can be used by the company for promotion. "When I married Harry N O W Opt 3:45 17730 Jo I 866-8020 i e 3:45 12719 Gratiot 371-4575 a. AIM Ntir 'P II U C.U.r.D.T" I Optm 3:45 t . - a plor w AT 4:00-6:00-8:00-9:55 DETROIT EXCLUSIVE j". 4, ,21 "v - - - -- I , : : TrTrl tTigiA'faia DETROIT FREE PRESS Hollywood on Being Marrying Debbie Reynolds: "I'm not 18 and don't play 'Tammy any more. You grow up In life as well as in your profession . . . think J've faced my problems and matured both professionally and as a human being." Karl he told me I couldn't afford the kind of salary I was getting, and made the agent cut my salary down to what be considered reasonable. .- "After a certain amount, It all goes in taxes, and while we want the government to have plenty of money, he felt that instead of $200,000 more coming to me, it should stay in the production. I love this business, have been raised in it, and don't want to take any more out than I feel I give it." THEN MY long-time friend cleared away the last unspoken things between us: "I came here today to find out why you've been acting toward me as you have," she said. "You don't have to explain I know you were upset when I married Harry. S o were other people, who had a few words to say to me. But Harry had made me very happy. He's a funny man, in a quiet way." "My family objected at first because of the age difference," Debbie continued. "Harry is 50 and I'm 32. But now they love him. We went together for a year and a half before we married. He's pefect for me. We have a companionship I could never have had in my first marriage to Eddie (Fisher). "I DON'T WANT to criticize my first marriage, but It was like a young boys' club. I'm comparing, but without comparison we wouldn't know happiness, o r misery. I wish you knew Harry better; all your misgivings are unfounded. We've had our third anniversary and in three years have never had one fight. And he's very conscientious with the children; . Todd and Carrie (her c h i 1- THEATRE 13843 AND AT THE WOODWARD TO -189 OPEN 1:45 STARTS 2:00 HOW PLAYING! TERRIFIC DOUBLE SHOW! EXCLUSIVE! 1st SHOWING! BOTH SHOWS IN BREATHTAKING COLOR! INGRID, is oniy v nn( nf the - many beautiful girls who shed their earthly cares for a holiday with the sun-worshippers 'V YANNICK in a reveofing vndwwattr ballet' II Mi kill cnim 'Molly Harry dren by Eddie Fisher) love him." Debbie Is now ranked as the most popular star, above Sophia Loren, Liz Taylor, and Doris Day. When I told her, she said she was happy about that, but not about the comparison. She feels the public is beginning to accept her in her new image : "Im not 18 and don't play 'Tammy any more. You grow up in life aa well as in your profession. Comedy seems to be my talent. But in order to do good comedy, you have to be able to do dramatic scenes, also. You're challenged either to grow up or to become embittered and jaded by expereince. "I THINK I've faced my problems and matured both professionally and as a human being." "After six years, I feel I'm entitled to my own life and peace." This brought us full-circle to the issue of our misunderstanding, and Debbie broke the ice for us both. "Come on now, let's have a truce," she said. And a truce we have. mm THE PINK panther; DAVID NIVEN PETER SELLERS "VJ&raJt Ths CRITIC" M.MM OPEN 3:45 STARTS 4:00 FREE PARKING NEXT DOOR at both theatres! HIT NO. 1 SHOWS AT PARIS 3:30 6:00 8:30 10:50 SHOWS AT MELODY 5:40 8:15 10:40 PLUS HIT NO. 2 AT BOTH THEATRES June TOKinSon THE- leiifeojfe a very -funny -tae about little man with B'66iRis SHOWS AT PARIS 2:00. 4:30. 7:00. 9:20 AT MELODY 4:00 4:30 9:10 BLAKE EDWAROS-rIJSS!? ,W,.I,II,..I-.,IM.L,M,, I. I, LW.BUU ,,1,1.1 . Bww-u, ,,,.,,,,,,,,!,., H, .,. H." ' ' V I eV"T X SVw l They are not adversaries, that is certain, but there IS the question of who outshines whom in "The World of Henry Orient," the movie which opens Wednesday at the Mercury. Some contend that Peter Sellers, at left, maintains his usual edge over the rest of the cast, and the fact that he plays the title role is a'definite help. But, significantly, there is a vocal group which holds that the two young ladies at right carry off all the bouquets. The young ladies are Tippy Walker and Merrie Spaeth, and they are cast as adoring fans of Air. Orient, a flamboyant concert pianist. A Light Week Of Concerts With a very slim concert calendar, the rummer musical doldrums seem to be settling over Detroit this week. SUNDAY Chamber Music Players of Music On Campus University or Michigan Final May Festival performances, 2:30 and 8:30 this Sunday, Hill Auditorium: Tchaikovsky's Tlque Dame," 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Stanley Quartet, 8 p.m. Wednesday, Fair Lane Manor, Dearborn campus. Michigan State University Blrgit Nilsson, soprano, 8:15 p.m. Monday, University Auditorium. Chamber music concert, 8:15 p.m. Tuesday, Music Auditorium. Central Michigan University Spring Choir concert, 3 p.m. this Sunday, Warriner Auditorium; Student recitals, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday, Recital Hall. Adrian College Michigan I n t e rcollegiate Choral Festival. 8 p.m. Thursday, College Auditorium. 1 it HURRYI LAST 3 DAYS! GregoryTony Peck Curtis 5T1 Adilts $1 t 6 p.m. (Ext. Sin. Hols.) atinf tTiry sat.. Son.. wr DETROIT PREMIERE The LANDAU Compjny pfesents SARAH MILES' DIRK BOGARDE The SEX, Starring SEAN rlynoetfc KeJ t farminstoa Lead mrrnnti Cinfipld t rrrt 832-S665 ltl 3:45 iMUUJL , THEY LIVE...AND LOVE AS THEY PLEASE ALSO: "THE FLAMBOYANT SEX" WYMUT J Gross Pointe. S p.m. Grosse Point War Memorial. Easter Concert. 4 p.m. Serbian Hall, 19940 Van Dyke. Edo Lubich, entertainer, g-uest star. Don Frohman Chora Concert. 8:30 p.m. Art Institute Auditorium. Detroit Lyric Theatre opera concert. 3 p.m. Art Institute lecture hall. Marian Van Llew Lincoln, organ, .7:30 p.m. Central Woodward Christian Church. TUESDAY Cantata Academy Bach Family Concert. 8:30 p.m. Community Arts Auditorium. WEDNESDAY Orpheus Club Concert. 8:40 p.m. Scottish Rite Cathedral. FRIDAY Cans Tech Music Festival. 8:30 p.m. Cass Tech High School. SATURDAY Cass Tech Music Festival. 8:30 p.m. Cass Tech High School. 3 THE HOJE 1 ATTRACTION OF ALLTIME WINNER OF 4 ACADEMY AWARDS SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES! WATS. DAILY 2 P. M. EV6S. 8 P. M. LOtATfcA Color by Deluxe. 10 lACUr AVf. WO -7U I ,' i NOW ..."A SLICK, SPOOKY SPELL- STUDY OF CORRUP TION "HCOMMHDUI ADULT ENTERTAINMENT. CHUDRFN WILL NOT K AOMITTTD. i A I ' 1 BINDING yj hmi Kimr vl .W OIBK i M BOGARDE .1 "BEST ( EXCLUSIVE 1ST RUN at the 2 Newest Theatres in town! SPIES, A WILD HUNK O1 FICTION . . . A GLAMOROUS SHOW!" ,, ,..-. Osgood, WXYZ UI FLEMINGS CONNERY as JAMES BOND FIRST DETROIT SHOWING EXCLUSIVE FOR ADULTS r X STUDID-B 1 Gr,nf;.Id Berth eF I MILE U 2-K2T B f In ih Grm4 Shopping Cntf 8 V ; STUWO-8 1 lit?- V I- t i AS U ' . , Aixns: A? A Is Returning To U-M in Autumn The Association of Producing Artists will be back at the University of Michigan next fall for a third season of the Professional Theater Program. Robert C. Schnitzer said the APA repertory will run Sept. 23 through Nov. 15, with "War and Peace," "The Hostage," "Man and Superman," and a fourth yet to be named. The APA Is currently engaged at the w York Phoenix Theater, where its successful run has been extended through Labor Day. Coming to Michigan with the troupe will be Ellis Rabb, Paul Sparer, Clayton Cor-zatte, Jan Ferrand, Joanna Roos, Richard Woods, Sydney Walker and Keene Curtis. In addition to the APA ETJian-BiMiiivaasiiM SKYDIVERS" NOW OOOKIDI) r tllZalUM M6E pie Starts Friday Yoyri n m TIPPY WALKER and MERRIE It s Youth maKine make-believe ...and adults r. making for real! jt ''. It's a biff. wide. i wonderful whin through all the joys of Sving, lovirff and Uughirg!- 5 i Wn iMM MiMMMeMBeaaadeaeaaaeaaaaaaaaV i 7 i . yj m t a Sr-rrr?.. ., .8S!5S v. f Br!" "THE BALLAD OF THE TOWN THAT At told bj Lome Creene and sung "THE DAY THAT SHADOW presentations the professional theater program will sponsor a new Play of the Month series running' from December of this year through next April. Five outstanding professional plays will be presented. nrTi x yr7fi 2 HITS IN COLOR "CAPTAIN SINBAD" KOW FREE PARKING E23 MAD WORLD' 3 Shows Today at STAXLEYKRAEH ,.,. 1 1 o A MAD, bexeffic. by mail MAU, MAD, J'LV" MAD Club branches. WORLD" Orth. S2 8 J3.00 2.l0 $2.50 J3 00 J 2. 85 Son. thra Than Ev. 8 30 P M. Fri.. Sat. A Hoi. Evas. 8 JO P.M. WedotMlay Matinee 2:00 PI. Saturday Matinee 1:00 P.M. Saturday 4:45 P.M. Sal. Mat. 1:00 P.M. I 4:45 P.M. EXCLUSIVELY AT: wmm music hall Superb brilliant . w-c:-:-:---.v.;...- SAMUFI. RRONTOM jggj-A LOREN... IItlU stp" BOYD alecGUINNESS lfr MASON ojristopher PLUMMER CD iwrm IRELAND 5i FERRER and ANTHONY MANN jDlMlTRI TIOMKIN?,, IIMuJ BOX OFFICE ' OPEM NOON to 9 P.M. DAILY AT tl Wl.JJIjtai.i..llia.i 1 i ' 1 llO I Am Step into the world nf Hpnrv Orient... unu meet two SP1ETH 1 11111 OFSIZS misses and one king-size nut! : will' FREE PtlKIHC L. PETeR SeiLERS pam psemss hiigeb uunar r i " " ' , TCM BOSLEY Ph'ilLIS TKAXTER ONCE WAS" tj ViBghn Monroe In MOUNTAIN DIED" Adultt $1 before) 6 p.m. ( Excepf Sur:d-y & Holidays) Min Evry Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. mm f4HI PAMELA Cn Nelson Fay Spain I in "THUNDER ISLAND" tel.lili! r-rT' CONSTANCE T0WTRS iflMi ' ANTHONY EISLEY 44 GARY COOPER AUDREY HEPBURN iMr'lOVE IN THE AFTERNOON" witfi MAURICE CHEVAIIER HAS IT ALL!" L. Conk F. Preii 1:00 4:458:30 . For Theatre Party Information, Call the Special Services Dept. WO 1-3783 11 Mf7I. $2.85 $3.00 $2.50 $3 00 $2 85 Bait. 11.80 $2.00 H oO $2 00 $2 00 Jl.bO BOX OFFICE OPENS TODAY AT 12 NOON 350 MADISCN n W0 1-3788 f iTV'ii. r-r: V CONSTANCE TOWtRS J IAY- chariot race exceeds Ben Hur! J Hedda Hopper f oSHARIF r--,-v'-ri v. MADISON xvH!, CI1CUS fAK AIL PERFORMANCES ,f j .1, njameaau U .pm I 'A ; kv pi r A n.ytw PANAVISICr COLOR by DELUXE BIB! OSTER'.'ALD PETER DUCKW 1 - V7-? m J f I aK ! V J 4. v

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