Detroit Free Press from Detroit, Michigan on January 22, 1977 · Page 4
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Detroit Free Press from Detroit, Michigan · Page 4

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Saturday, January 22, 1977
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Page 4
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l-A Saturday, Jan. 22, '77 DETROIT FREE PRESS I Quake Toll Staggering; :A Laetrile Breakthrough i : o J SHAKE, RATTLE AND TOLL: If reports that 655,000 persons perished during earthquakes in China last summer are accurate, 1976 had the highest earthquake toll in modern times, the U.S. Geological Survey reports. The world toll was placed at 725,000. The record toll was due to more quakes in highly populated areas, the experts said. I RED PLANET RUMBLINGS: Seismic activity isn't limited to Earth: The Viking II Mars probe, it was revealed Friday, recorded two quakes on the Red Planet last November. Scientists don't know enough yet to determine what caused the tremors. j LAETRILE LEGALITIES: A 75-year-old San Diego man suffering from inoperable pancreatic cancer got a federal court order Friday allowing him to import laetrile, the controversial J(nti-cancer drug, from Mexico. The drug, derived from apricot pits, is used in 22 nations for treating cancer but is banned in the U.S. Lawyers will return to court Monday, seeking a waiver of responsibility for the MD who will treat the man. Laadb Hoover: His brand? What a Grind As coffee prices soar, the penny-pinching public has searched for viable alternatives. Apparently one of the most viable is an exotic blend of barley, chicory and corn. It's a remnant of the Great Depression and is popularly known as "Hoover Coffee," after President Herbert Hoover. The exact recipe: one pound of barley, one-fourth pound of chicory and a half-pound of corn. Mix and roast in an oven until brown, then grind and brew like the real thing. ; UNHOLLY ALLIANCE: Consumer activist Ralph Nader joined forces Friday with two congressman to urge that nuclear power plants be shut down unless there is absolute proof they can be safely operated. Among the group's demands: location of all reactors underground, and assignment of federal guards to monitor reactors with authority to shut them down at any time. SST BIRTHDAY: British Airways marked the first year of its commercial supersonic transport service Friday with dec-arations that the future is rosy for SST travel. Despite operating at a loss currently, airline officials said 30 percent of SST passengers were new customers, pirated from other airlines. The Britons are hopeful the'll apporval to land in New York soon. ACCIDENTLY ON PORPOISE: West Coast tunamen got a court order in San Diego Friday to block enforcemnt of a new law effectively prohibiting them from going after whitefin tuna, a common species. The law prohibited even the accidental killing of porpoises, who often travel with the whitefin. The judge set the limit on accidentaly killed porpoises to 10,000, however. Surveying the Scene The great American migration is slowing down, but the central cities are still the biggest losers. The Census Bureau says 35.6 million Americans moved during the year that ended last March, down two percent from the previous year. Central city areas lost two millions folks, three out of four to the suburbs . . . The adage that a women's work is never done is taking a beating. A McCall's magazine survey shows that four out of five housewives spend less than 30 minutes a day straightening up the house . . . With housework apparently out of the way, more women are going to school. The Census Bureau reports a 75 percent jump in the number of women pursuing an education beyond a bachelor's degree last year . . . As usual, newcomers to the job market will find a mixed situation. College grads in engineering or accounting are in demand. Non-grads willing to take special preparatory courses in technical fields will be in the money too. Things look dimmest for communications and education grads. Jobs in those fields are particularly tight . . . Tradition is making a comeback on college campuses. A survey backed by the Carnegie Foundation shows that in six years student interest in abolishing grades and required courses 'has dropped dramatically. Another thing making a comeback is religion 10 percent more disciples during that period . . . Those petrodollars landing in Arab pockets have something attached to them American diseases. Cancer, heart disease and mental illness are growing in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Iran where such afflictions once were rare. World Hot Spots . . . RHODESIA: British peace negotiator Ivor Richard met with Premier Ian Smith for two hours Friday, failing to reach a breakthrough on black rule for Rhodesia. Smith will imeet with his cabinet this weekend to discuss Richard's proposals. LEBANON: Arab Peacekeeping forces will sweep strongholds of warring factions in Beirut over the weekend to confiscate caches of heavy armaments. All weaponry was supposed to be surrendered last week under an. Arab League ultimatum. EGYPT: The government is pinning the blame for the bloody s food riots on communist elements and 900 suspected sympathizers in Cairo have been arrested since the rioting ceased Thursday. The sweep is expected to. further sour relations with the Soviet Union. The death toll was revised upward to 68 on Friday. INDIA: Four major opposition parties said Friday they'll band together to present a united front against the regime of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi for the March Parliamentary elections. The government loosened up further Friday, closing the censorship office in New Dlehi. PORTUGAL: Scattered protests followed a government decision Friday to hike the price of gassoline by 25 percent to $2.50 per gallon. Bringing In the Bacon If you think higher energy prices are the only expensive legacy of the numbing cold snap hitting the nation, guess again. In addition to higher prices for Florida citrus and vegetables because of the big freeze there, prices for California oranges, grapes, wines, tomatoes, lettuce, celery, asparagus, almonds, raisins, peaches, plums and wheat will rise, too. The problem out west isn t cold it's lack of rain. In the last six months, what little precipita-' tion that has fallen hit where it i wasn't needed, making things tough for farmers, and in turn for consumers. All that misery is a bonanza for Texas farmers. They had a very good citrus harvest and stand to make big profits from the fruits of their labor. But buyers can take some consolation in the fact that cows and pigs can withstand the cold bettor than most human beings, so the cold won't affect beef and pork prices. "To those pigs, weather doesn't make any difference," said Dr. A. H. Jensen of the University of Illinois Agriculture School. Basically both species are cold-resistant animals and if the porkers are kept out of traditional slop-filled pens and given a dry and comfortable place to sleep, everything will be fine. Pass the bacon. Girl Missing Since Jan. 2 Found Dead in Snowy Ditch Continued from Page IA her body except for her knees and her hand," Wozny said. He said it looked to him as if the snow had been thrown over the body in an effort to hide it. Two police helicopters were called to the scene to make an aerial surveillance and take photographs. Sgt. Dave Piche of the Berkley Police Department said nothing else was found near the body. He said there was no visible sign of how the girl was slain. Police speculated that the body may have been dumped in the ditch sometime after Monday because the footprints were made in plowed snow. Monday was the last time the road was plowed. STEVE HANDEL, 17, who lives in a home in the cul-de-sac at the foot of Bruce Lane, said he regularly walks along the road in the morning and afternoon to and from the school bus. Except for the homes at the dead end, Bruce Lane in flanked on each side by woods and fields. Handel said the only unusual thing he noticed this week was a pickup truck parked Thursday near where the body was found. He said the driver of the truck appeared to be sleeping. L. BROOKS Patterson, Oakland County prosecutor, said were was no immediate evi- 4 Killed In Copter FLORENCE, 111. - (UPI) -Four persons aboard a Coast Guard helicopter surveying navigation conditions were killed when the craft snapped two high-tension wires and crashed into the icy Illinois River. The victims were Coast Guard Lt. John F. Taylog, a reservist from Belleville, 111.; Petty Officer John Johnson of Mission, Tex.; William S. Simpson of Chesterfield, Mo., a member of the Government-Industry River Advisory Committee, and Navy Lt. Fredrick W. Caeser of El Paso, Tex. Costly Warm-Up PONTIAC, 111. - (UPI) - A woman trying to warm up the engine of her car hooked up an unshielded light bulb beside the engine and covered it with a blanket, firemen said. Apparently some oil overheated and the resulting blaze caused about $900 damage. Detroit JfcttVtm the action paper Tht Detroit Fr Pwi ii pufaKslwd daily by Dtlroi! FrM Prtii, Inc. of 321 W. lalayttt Blvd., Detroit, Michigan 48231. Scond-clau pottogt paid at Dttroit, Michigan. SUBSCRIPTION IATIS By Moil Stot of Michigan Dolly Ik Dally Sunday Sunday Only Only OntVMT $83.20 S49.40 S33.80 Si. Month. 41.60 24.70 1690 ThrttMonthl 20.80 12.35 8.45 Oi Month 6.97 4.12 2.85 OntWi 1.60 .95 .65 (Minimum ordof on month) By Mail Outtido Start ol Michigan Dally tt Dally Sunday Sunday Only Only OntYtor 591.00 554.60 536.40 Sin Month. 45.50 27.30 18.20 Thrt Months 22.75 13.65 9.10 On. Month 7.60 4.55 3.05 OiwWmIi 1.75 1.05 .70 (Minimumardtr on month) Conadion and Foreign rot, upon raqutit. Second clou pottog inckidd in obov fat.. No (ir.t clot, or oirmail available. M Addrtu including home number, apartment, irrt, zip cod, ond rtmittanct mutt accompany aH moil ordr. Addrtu Dttroit Fr Prtii, Circulation (Mail) Dpt., Dttroit, Mich. 48231. MIMBIR OF ASSOCIATID PUSS Th Auociotad Pru it wcknhwly entitled to th uw ol reproduction ol al nwt, dh patch, credited to or not othcrwiw credited in thi. paper and olio to In local new. publithed herein. AH right, of reproduction or ipeciol diipotche. herein or aho reierved. ADVIITISINO IIPMSINTATIVIS Knight-Ridder Newspaper Sol., Inc., New . York, Chicago, Atlanta, Miami, Dttroit, lot Angel., San Froncitco, Minneapolii. Travel and Retort for Canada-Metropoliton Pub-li inert Repreientativet, Montreal, Toronto. Mkoi Repretntaciont Profewonalej, S.A., Maiico City, GuorJoiajara. WE'VE GOT BRAND NAME LABELS THE BEDSPREAD PLACE 40-70 savings on Designer Spreads in stock The Bedspread Place (a factory outlet) has designer spreads at a fraction of the cost in other retail stores. We sell closeouts, samples, and odd job lots. Special orders and custom spreads and draperies at 20 savings. 341 E. Main, NorthvOle Phone: 349-0030 or 349-5820 Hums Men.-far. 9:30-5:30. Sun. 12S 425 Walnut Blvd., Rochester Phone: 652-4540 Hours: Men.-Sar. WJ:30 v 15 MILE - Jj if- BODY OF SHEW SR0CK, kV I JILL ROBINSON, 12, f CYNTHIA CADIEUX, 15, MURDERED HERE V B0DY F0UN0 0NE I FOUND HERE JAN 19 1S76 MF NORTH OF HERE, JAN. 16, 1976 14 MILE 5 1 KRISTINE k af BODY OF 13Mli WCHELICH, 10TY JILL ROBINSON tif KRISTINE LIVEDI !JN I MICHEUCH HERE! I LIVED HERE A- FOUND HERE,- 1-j 5V HERE, JAN. 2, 1977 g 'wS 11 MILE q Z 10 MILE 5 DETROIT EE B0DY0F 200 x MARK STEBBINS, 12, , 5 FOUND HEREFEB. 19, 1976 " 8 MS I dence to tie Kristine's death with the other four deaths of youngsters in southern Oakland County. Besides Miss Cadieux, Jill Robinson, 12, was found slain last Dec. 26, four days after she ran away from her Royal Oak home. Sheila Strock, 14, was murdered while baby-sitting for her niece in Birmingham Jan. 19, 1976. A month later, the body of Mark Stebbins, 12, of Fern-dale, was discovered near a Southfield shopping center at TenMle and Greenfield. Both Kristine and the Robinson girl were fully clothed. The bodies of the others were in various states of undress. KRISTINE was reported missing by her mother, Mrs. Deborah Ashcroft, at 6 p.m. Jan. 2. The girl had left her This story was reported by William Hart, Ken Fire-man and Jane Briggs-Bunt-ing and written by James Dewey. home about 3 p.m. to go to a nearby store to buy a teen magazine. Kristine arrived at the store, bought her magazine and left. The store clerk, Kathy Carson, was the last person to see her. Kristine's mother, who is divorced, remained secluded in her home Friday. A friend said she was being kept informed of developments by police. AT PATTENGILL Elemen-tary School where Kristine was in the fifth grade, her teacher, Mrs. Sarah Bishop, said she was "shocked." "I can't get used to it yet," Mrs. Bishop said. She described Kristine as a kind and considerate child. "I was looking through my records yesterday (Thursday) and I found a note Kris wrote me thanking me for a Christmas present," Mrs. Bishop said. "She was the only one in the class who was thoughtful enough to write me a thank-you note. That's the kind of sweet girl she was." January . ) JM JP SpU Sales .... - J perry WJfc 'Great Savings! I '"l3?o v OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY NIGHTS SALE Miss J Fall and Winter Coats $44 to $68 exceptional savings on coats, in time for cold weather wear . . .choose from a selection of wool btend pant coats or untrimmed boot lengths, in 5 to 15 sizes. FROM OUR 4hU1 JacdteanS Grosse Pointe Birmingham Dearborn Ann Arbor East Lansing Toledo Saginaw Jackson Battle Creek Kalamazoo Grand Rapids Buy and Sell Through Free Press Want Ads ymi Our Famous ANNUAL Water Heateir Sale F El Save$12 Wards 30-gallon gas water heater. Glass-lined tank for clear, clean. water. Fiber glass insulation to conserve heat 38,000-BTU input. Buy Reg. 89.99 now! Save $20 Wards "better" 30-gal. gas water heater 89 46,000-BTU 2 stage input heats 38.6 gals, per hr. Rust-resistant glass-lined tank. Fiber glass insula- Reg. 109.99 tion. 127.99 40-gal. gas heater, 99.88 Save$25 Wards finest 30-gal. . gas water heater 88 PUUONI YIAI WARRANTY Monteomtry Word war-font this wettf htotar for on ytof from daft of pvnfcoM Warat will furnish ond install a now haa tor of tH than oqutvolant moot I tVtt if th hatr tor latti, ond will raeoir any ethor dfctivo port fra of oWfl for pom or lobar. lIMtTID MINI Yf At WARRANTY AOAINST TANK UAKAGf For on additional nint yaon Wards will fumith o fraa rploemnt of th thtn equivalent modal if th hir tanks leaks, labor it net included during this period. This warranty does hot temt h eaten in other than single or two family residence in. For warranty lervlea contact any Montgomery Ward broneh. Evidence of date of purdioia is required. 53,000-BTU cast iron burner. Rust-resistant glass-lined tank. Fiberglass insul. 114 88 Reg. 139.99 149.99 40-gal gas 159.99 50-gal.gas IMMMIIMHIIMMtMNII IHHIIHMtHHINfMHMlnlHMtMI 119.88 139.88 Save $35 Better 52-gallon electric heater 99 88 Regularly 134.99 Glass-lined tank won't rust or corrode. Fiber glass insulation, easy to set thermostat controls, adj. 120" to 170. Save $30 Best 52-gallon elec. hot water heater 114 88 Reg. 144.99 With extra-fast hot water recovery. Full capacity model with many features found on more expensive models. White finish. 174.99 82-gal.elec, 144.88 10 savings 10-gal.elec. water heater i 54 88 Reg. 64.99- Extra-thick fiber-glass X insulation, dual watt v heating element. Cop-1 ; per lined steel nipple, 7; stainless steel. Inlet . tube. Great buy! ' 69.99 20-gal. elec, 64.88 SHOP THE EASY WAY CHARGE YOUR GIFTS AT WARDS Drop by for the holidays. fjg4D ANN ARBOR ALLEN PARK DETROIT MT. CLEMENS DEARBORN DETROIT WONDERLAND PONTIAC SOUTHFIELD SOUTH GATE WARJtEN Arborlind Cnlr 971 2750 16670 South- CrandRivtr 15 Mil Roid Michigan it Grttinlnr Plymouth it Telegraph it Telegraph it Trenton ai Dequindrttt field Road 386 90 it Greenfield 835-4200 at Gratiot 791-2000 Schar'er ' Mile Road Middlehelt Rd. 584-0S00 371 1100 427-1600 Alio available in Flint mi Toledo r- Ehuheth Lk Rd 682 4940 12 Mile Road 3581200 Eureka RaiJ 285-4400 12 Mile Rd K1-7S00 i i

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