Detroit Free Press from Detroit, Michigan on August 26, 1980 · Page 5
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Detroit Free Press from Detroit, Michigan · Page 5

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Detroit, Michigan
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Tuesday, August 26, 1980
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Page 5
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DETROIT FREE PRESSTUESDAY, AUG. 26, 1 980 5 A 1 Hudson's semi-onnud Bake and broil your way to red hot savings ft! T"w mum ""w M 1 - - y! AP Pholo Ronald Reagan, left, and George Bush after their press conference. i China flap a mistake, Reagan says '" y iffllM IIIIllIBll From AP and UPI LOS ANGELES Ronald Reagan, struggling to escape an embarrassing diplomatic vise, admitted Monday that as president he would strengthen U.S. relations with Taiwan. But he stressed that his proposals, which have angered the Chinese, are allowed under the Taiwan Relations Act as passed by Congress, f The Republican presidential candidate, describing the flap as a matter of semantics, emphasized that he never advocated renewing formal diplomatic relations with Taiwan. And in what appeared to be a conciliatory gesture toward the Chinese government, Reagan pledged to work with all Asian countries against aggression threatened stability. REAGAN, APPEARING at a joint news conference with Bush to calm the diplomatic storm, said President Carter has contradicted the act's legislative intent and humiliated the Taiwanese by his interpretation of it. "I will eliminate petty practices of the Carter administration, which are inappropriate and demeaning to our Chinese friends on Taiwan," he said. Indeed, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, in a . report assessing the Act's first-year consequences, said that while it was generally successful, some problems had arisen stemming "primarily from the administration's defining 'unofficial relations' too narrowly." The Chinese press generally lambasted Bush, constantly referring to Reagan's "two-China" policy. The Chinese official news agency accused the GOP ticket of "attempting to turn back the clock." Vice-President Walter Mondale, speaking in upstate New York, agreed with the Chinese estimate. Reagan said Bush's trip to Peking provided "extensive exchanges of views," and said he believes the objective was reached. Bush explained that "I very clearly pointed out Governor Reagan's support, proper in my view, for the Taiwan Relations Act. We're (Reagan, Bush and the Chinese) bound to disagree. I don't think you have to know anything about the China equation to suggest some of these things would cause heartburn in Peking." The former California governor accused Carter of accepting some unnecessary Chinese conditions for normalization which had been refused by Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. "I felt that a condition of normalization by itself a sound policy choice should have been the retention of a liaison office on Taiwan of equivalent status to the one we had earlier established in Peking," he said. M 33.99 I i M sale 59.99 Reg. 74.98. Toastmaster toaster-oven-broiler cleans Itself continuously while you cook-(the oven walls have a porcelain enamel coating). With quartz elements for faster heat-up on less energy. Toasts 6 slices of bread, 9" pies or cakes. You'll have a full temperature range from 200 to 500 F. Safety features, too. 150 units." sale 69.99 Reg. 84.98. Toastmaster System III oven-broiler with Slow Heat settings to cook, then brown meat all at once. Separate dishes can be cooked at the same time with no worry about mingling flavors. Cooks a whole meal, soup, vegetables, even the dessert for a family of 2 to 6 in 8 to 10 hours. 125 units. i ' saHon,.."-" 33.99 sale 34.99 Reg. 43.98. GE Toast R Oven will actually cost you just 31.99 because you'll receive a $3 rebate from GE If you buy before Sept. 1st. Here's the big-little energy saver that toasts, bakes and top browns tool As a toaster: it handles 4 slices of most breads, then signals when they're ready. As an oven: it handles a large 3- course frozen dinner. The special top brown setting browns, crisps or melts tops of foods, there's even a separate oven temperature dial. Along with a removable oven tray and racks, hinged crumb tray that swings open for cleaning. 150 units. sale 33.99 Reg. 37.98. GE automatic grill-and-waffle baker Is three appliances In one. It's a waffle baker with closed or open grill. It bakes 4- section waffles (has a signal light) then, it opens flat for open grilling,..or, closed for sandwiches. Special channel for grease drainage. Non-stick coated cooking surface. 150 units Aides clamp down on ad-libbing by candidate Reagan. Page 12D. Carter ponders limited debate sale 149.99 Reg. 189.98. Toastmaster convection oven-broiler broils, bakes, but also features slow heat and convection cooking. In broiling, heat radiates from top elements sealing in the juices. In baking, top and bottom elements assure balanced baking, And in convection 'cooking, forced hot air circulates to cook foods evenly. 75 units . In The Marketplace at all Hudson's stores. "Total units at all Metropolitan Detroit Hudson's stores while quantities last, 59.99 sale 33.99 Reg. 39.98. Salton convection toaster with radiant and convection heat that provides a hot air updraft to speed up toasting time by 20. You can toast things like English muffins and even home baked bread with one setting. The slot holds 2 slices of white bread or one long thick slice of French bread, 125 units.' By TOM FIEDLER Free Press Washington Staff WASHINGTON President Carter's campaign strategists are considering participating in only one of three presidential campaign debates sponsored by the League of Women Voters, White House sources said Monday. That plan stems partly from Carter's irritation at the League for failing to consult with either him or Republican nominee Ronald Reagan in scheduling the three debates, and partly from unhappiness that the League format could include-independent candidate John Anderson. TWO-MAN debates are a cornerstone of Carter's reelection strategy, aides say. They believe Carter will appear to have "an encyclopedic knowledge" of the presidency, while Reagan will seem simplistic and shallow. The League of Women Voters' debate format would include Anderson if, by Sept. 10, Anderson has the support of 15 percent of the people surveyed in public opinion polls. As a result, the president, if he limits himself to the League debates and Anderson gets the 15 percent, couldn't be guaranteed a head-to-head confrontation against Reagan. The plan now being formulated by Carter workers calls for the president to participate in one Legaue debate, and in one more debate against Reagan with another sponsor. Campaign sources have noted that two of the three proposed Leagues debates fall on Monday nights, where they would be competing for audiences against the popular Monday Night Football broadcasts on ABC. Carter is expected to refuse debate invitations for those nights. The first League debate, however, is slated for Baltimore on Sept. 18, a Thursday, and Carter probably will accept that if Reagan also agrees. WHILE THE DEBATE talk bubbled, Carter and Sen Edward M. Kennedy held a rather subdued meeting to discuss the coming campaign and the president's economic proposals. Carter's domestic affairs adviser Stuart Eisenstat conferred with Kennedy for more than an hour, briefing him on the president's economic proposals, before the senator left his office to meet with Carter. 69.99- lit ' 'l!1 149.99 Ojpn Monday through Saturday: Nlotlhland, Fastland, Pontiac, Wetland, Oakland, Southland and Jwelve Oaks 9:30 till 9, Lakeside, Fairlane and Ann Arbor 9:30 till 9:30; Flint 10 til! 9:30, Downtown open 9:3'0 till 5:45. A Also contributing to this story was United Press International.

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