Detroit Free Press from Detroit, Michigan on November 10, 1929 · Page 108
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Detroit Free Press from Detroit, Michigan · Page 108

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Detroit, Michigan
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Sunday, November 10, 1929
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Page 108
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192 Found the Mysterious Royal THE DETROIT FREE PRESS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER HHk I sn ess. MMMtMMMMMMMMM x - -ir-r TT'-V ... v-: yr f f U 'ft ) Burying Ground of Blonde Children Fathered by a Race of Giants 3,000 Years Ago on T: lHAT a race of magnificent, tall, white Indians once roamed the Americas long be fore the first European sailed across the Atlantic has been a subject for mild, almost bantering debate among archaeologists. None of them took the thing very seriously; it was regarded as picturesque legend. But now amazing new discoveries have confirmed beyond question that white men had already lived in America for centuries when Columbus landed. New Amis on Catalina Island, off the EXCAVATOR A member of Prof. Glidden's party, pretty Miss Agnes Bell, with one of the carved jewel boxes made of clam shells which belonged to the Indian princess. 5 M- h A Wl ' "n "J tr fi lettiii i iiinniin if urun susrlrriis ih -1 y v-'; n t-" 1 Young Miles Overholt, Jr., of Catalina Island, holding a tray of the white Indians teeth, 4,083 of them, enough for 127 sets. Not a single tooth showed marks of decay. California coast, overshadow In richness and significance most of the archaeological events of recent years. Digging, on an outlying part of the Island, long the favorite "location" for movie directors seeking atmosphere, Professor Ralph Glidden, curator of the Catalina museum, has uncovered overwhelming proof that a fair-skinned, tow-headed, highly Intelligent race once lived in the west. His discovery of a vast cache of skeletons, urns, heads, wampum and domestic utensils, is no ordinary Indian relic find. Not only does It reveal the existence of a white race of Indian living In America some 3,000 years ago, but it poses a tragic mystery. Trofessor Glidden's first startling find was a huge funeral urn carved out of stone, and containing the skeleton of a young girl, crouched In an upright position within, the finger-bones of her little hands clenched over the wampum-inlaid brim. Ia a circle surrounding the urn were Interred the bodies of 64 little children, In tiers four deep, their small heads placed close together. Some five feet below the children was the skeleton of a gigantic man a man measuring 7 feet 8 Inches from the top of the skull to the ankle bone. A spear blade was embedded in the ribs of the left side. There was conclusive evidence Including strands of hair thnt all the?e people were blondes. The sand within the funeral urn had the arpearance of gio'ind crystal. It differed from the fand In the burial p!ot without and may have been sacred stul used only In the burial of royalty. Around the shoulders of the girl In the urn hung a necklace several yards lone, made of minutely carved stone beads. At the bottom of the urn was a Jasper spear blade. What ghastly accident, what wholesale slaughter, what weirdly Inhuman rlto. ca'jfed the dtaths of thee 63 young rtop!e? Were the Catalina Indians, known as K.ir?hir.ers of the s in god Chlnipchinch, addicted to the fearful ceremonial r.tes i,l child parrifice as is recorded of the ancient peoplei of Mexico, the Tolt r and the Ar'ers? Or did they follow the h rr!Me c:i.cora of slaying the aer;ri;i:.rs V'--:-. -V Catalina Island J7 V o "V' Ar' 6) her death, so that their spirits might accompany hers to the happy hunting grounds? Or It may be that the white Indians V-r J! VICTIM OF INHUMAN RITE I f : K .u. J3jl ' Th premier find: An ornate (unerel urn holding the upright skeleton of young girl. I 4 I - i "-I p " f V Buried near the urn, Prof. Glidden dug up the remains of 64 children, who may all I I I sij h ',Jtl'r- 'i ' f, J have been elain to accompany the Indian princess upon her lat journey. I THOUSANDS EMPLOYED IN BULLFIGHTING; INVESTMENT RUNS TO MANY MILLIONS B ULLFIGHTIXQ today is a big in dustry, representing an Investment of many millions of pesetas. and giving employment to several thousand persons, a United Press correspondent points out. The great "fiesta" has been popular on the Iberian peninsula "since thp memory of man runneth not to the contrary," but its organization as a strictly business proposition is a development of the last two or three centuries. The capital invested in bullfighting increases every year, and the number of persons dependent directly or indirectly upon it for a livelihood is augmented In direct ratio. The business affords the opportunity for the meteor-like ascendancy of one or two star pen'ormerg every year, but It also provides for steady all-year-round employment of thousands who never appear within the boarded arena. To get an Idea of the city real estate and country land dedicated to the business It Is only necessary to say that there are about 400 bullfighting arenas in Spain, an.l 100 ranches (ganaderlas) dedicated to perpetuating the Bos Taurus Ibericus the fighting bull which is found on'y in Spain and Portugal, or in ranches in Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela which sent to the peninsula for their original stock. Seating Capacity Large. Some of the arenas aie majestic and have a large seating capacity, such as the new one to be InaugJrateJ In Madrid next reason with a scatmg capacity of ::6. '-"0 and the Monumental arena In liarulona, which accommodates 25.0'jO. Incidentally, Madrid has three arenas in its suburbs, a:.d Barcelona has a secoai srr,aiier r.n;. Sn.ailcr rings, some of them teat ice 1.0'"') persons or even less, are sra'tered all over Spain, Spanish Morocco, and the Balearic islands. In CT.er?.! the arenas In the cities whtrh are raptta! of provinces be!o"e '" the yio.i..i.ai e. litLt ltS.(4uclB VICTIM OF INHUMAN RITE The premier find: An ornate funeral urn holding the upright skeleton of young girl. Buried near the urn, Prof. Glidden dug up the remains of 64 children, who may all have been slain to accompany the Indian princess upon her last journey. of the Island had a girl queen, Instead of a chieftain or king a queen chosen at birth by some sign from the god Chlnlgchinch. But Professor Glidden Is inclined to the belief that the little maid buried In the urn was the daughter of a reigning chief. She may have been killed by an enemy chief or a traitor and given a great war burial. As to how the children burled around her came to be killed he has not yet reached an opinion. "It is even possible that the little white Indian princess was given some poison potion and burled alive," states Professor Glidden. "The manner In which her hands clutched the rim of the urn makes this a possibility. The natural way In which her little head reclined against the stone side, as If she had merely fallen asleep, Is also significant." Burled in the pit with the skeletons of the other children were 187 artifacts. These, fashioned of shell bone and stone, Included treasure boxes made of two large clam shells cemented together with asphaltum and containing abalone pearl pendants, carved stone beads, small stone rings and other trinkets. There were also small paint pots, bone needles, carved heating stones, pipes, stone toys and miniature canoes. These Indicate that the white Indians of Catalina had Provincial), and are leased to empreza-rios, the revenue going to the provincial hospital. Tbe emprezario is also obliged to give four big benefit "coridas": one for the hospital, one for the Red Cross, one for the Montepio de Toreros (Bullfighters' Beneficent association), and one for the local Newspaper club, this last one generally being the most important and colorful of all the bullfights of the year. The ranches are run either for profit, or as a hobby, or to maintain an old family tradition. For hundreds of years the bulls were found at random in fact it la probable that bullfighting developed DETROIT REMEMBERS WITH FLAMING POPPY AS SYMBOL Continued From Page Three. fighting on Flanders fields. "And the two names," he continued, "Immortality linked with the symbols will be Betsy Uoss and Moina Michael." While men have been publicly praising her and her poppy idea has been circling the earth the Poppy idea has been serving as lady principal of the Georgia State Normal school at Athens, Georgia, the position she held when the World war called ber to the colors. For 40 years almost the entire span of her lite. Miss Michael has been doing social and educational work. She waa born on a farm near Good Hope, Georgia, the eldest daughter of John Marion Michael and Alice Sherwood Wise, whose family gave to Virginia. Governor 'Wise; to Texas, Governor Colquit and Governor Hubbard; and to Georgia, the present governor. Dr. L. (!. Ilaidman, and loimer Governor Colquit. Early in her life, certain financial re-verpes left her family penniless and threw upon her own slim shoulders the support of the ftimlly and the education of her younger sisters. She began teaching belore rhe was 14 years old and has frucit'erj through every phase of county, town an 1 i'.ve schools in Ceorcta. AVer hr apprc in counfv su.O'jis cu was asked U take charge of reached a relatively high stage of civilization. The professor has been looking for five months for the legendary temple of the sun god Chlnlgchinch. The temple Itself he believes Is buried under a high landslide cot far from where he came upon the graves of the children, Father Torquenada, San Franciscan friar, who visited Catalina In 1602, told of the ancient edifices, which he declared contained a hideous grinning Idol. Father Torquenada described the Indians, some of whom were alive when he made his visit: "The women are very handsome and decent. The children are white and ruddy and very smiling." Now the cryptic entries In the priest's diary have been verified, No longer can Europeans lay claim to being the first wWte immigrants to the New World. But how did the sun god worshipers reach the Island themselves? One theory recently given considerable substantiation Is that they migrated from the south many centuries ago. This assumption has been lent weight by Richard O. Marsh, the American explorer, who brought back from the wilds of Darlen, on the Isthmus of Tanama, three young members of the San Bias Indian tribe, spontaneously as a means of self-defense but with the approach of relatively modern times the bulls had to be raised In ranches, with much care being taken as to breeding and maintaining the qualities which make the fighting of the bull interesting. Tradition says that the "ganderias" began in the 15th or 16th century, but they really started in the 18th. The oldest existing ranch w.'ib established In Madrid province In 17S0 and is now In the hands of the Duke of Varagua, Don Cristobal Colon y Aguilera a direct descendant of the discoverer of America. The most important genaderias are in the Georgia Baptist Orphan's home in Atlanta. After four years' service there she went ba k to the school room, teaching in various towns of the state. Then she was sought out to be principal of Bessie Tift college. After two years there fhe was elected to the same k ,n of work in the Georgia State Normal school. She has traveled widely and was In Europe when the Wcrld war broke out in 1914. She served with the American committee at Rome, Italy, In assisting the embassy and the consulate in handling the di!fie;;itpS created for American tourists by the war. When the United States entered the conflict, she offered her services to tiie government immediately and waa appointed to the Y.M.C.A. Overseas head-quaners at Columbia, where the inspiration for the pop;iy pre gram came to her. Sh spout every penny which she had saved from her yens of teaching and many, ninny hours in spresding th'i idea; but. of course, tueie has never been a single regret. She is full of a glad content that It has winged i'seif further than she ever dared to hope and has brought peace and happln.-Fs to to many millions of people. When she look3 at the vase of poppies that always glows upon her desk at the State Normal, thre is a look of wonder in her cir h'-ip vec prayer of thnksgivms on her l:;. WHITE INDIANS OF DARIEN White Indian children of Darien, on the Isthmus of Panama, photographed with Richard O. Marsh, American explorer who discovered them. who were possessed of golden hair, pale blue eyes and white complexions. At first these white Indians were be-lleved by scientists to be albinos. But careful examination proved that they were not, although they did possess soma albino characteristics. There are three theories about them. One Is the supposition, not well'borno out, that they suffer from a disease called "leuco-dermia," common In the West Indies; In some quarters they are believed to be abnormal racial types, and a third theory Is that their white complexions are the the vicinity of Seville, Salamanca, Madrid, Jaen, Badajoz and Cordoba. When the climax of a bullfight Is reached, the "matador" Is in the ring to kill the bull yet hundreds of persons have had to perform some work to make that act possible. And since there are about 65 active matadores who hold the "doctor's degree" entitling them to kill the four-year-old bulls, and about 350 "matadores de novillos" who are entitled to fight the three-year-old bulls (or older defective bulls), one begins to realize the huge proportions of the business. In the ring, participating in the preliminary phases of tbe fight, are three "picadores" (horsemen) and three "ban-dorilleros" (those who piace the darts on the bull's back) for each "matador" and in Spain there are about 1.200 men In these two classes. But this enumeration is only a starter: one must take into consideration the fighter's manaeer: his "mozo de cstoque," the boy who carries factotum; the fellows who drag out the dead bulls and horses; the doctors who specialize the bulls. In curing wonds Inflicted by And That's Not All. Then there's the army of ticket gales-men; ushers; program vendors. Besides there are all kinds of inspectors and veterinary surgeons to examine the bulls and horses before they're allowed to enter the ring; a corps of butchers to hand e the bulls as they're killed; horse contractors; tailors, shoe makers, hatters and sword manufacturers who make a livjns outfitting the bullfighters not to mention monument makers who erect expensive monuments on their graves. There are still others who make a living off this great business, as for example those connected with the publication of th I J ntaL-azines and reviews (voted ex"lu.-Jvely to bulls: the bull-fi-htins rr po:ters of the daily papers; the prin'ing firms which issue programs ar.d posters; artists and writers whose subjects are generally connected with bullfighting. This list may sound pretty large, but remember that we must still add to it those who work on the 1C!) ranches devoted to rais.ng the fihtins fcig number. GRIM RELICS The weiid spectacle 187 human slculli with which Prof. Glidden startled Philip K. Wrigley, visitor to his camp. result of disturbances to the endocrine glands. Mr. Marsh described his discovery of tlia Panamanian white Indians In a letter to the London Times. He wrote: "I visited Ina Pagnina, chief of chiefs, or king of the Darlen. At my request Ina PaRuina called a confsrence of all the chipf3 of Darin. I told them I wanted to see the white Indians that have existed In Darien from time immemorial, long before the coming of the Spaniards. The chiefs called In the White Indians. They are numbered by the hundreds, If not by the thousands." Three young White Indians Mr. Marsh Above Bone whistles, 3,000 years old, found on Catalina Islands by Prof. Glidden. These ingenious needles, alio of bone, wen used by the ancient white tribe to fashion tea weed into garments. brought back to America with him, two boys and a girl. The boys and the girl had golden hair, blue eyes and white, tender skins. Their eyes, as in the case with albinos, were extremely sensitive to light, and both the boys' skins were blemished with "liver snots." Their gums were pink, their skulls unusually round and differing markedly from the skulls of typical San Bias Indians. They were not, clearly, however, true albinos, and It Is possible that they were the descendants of a race of white people who Inhabited Central America many generations ago. Perhaps the ancestors of these young people made their way up the Pacific coast of the Americas to Californiawhich was then a virgin wilderness unknown to the Old World. During the expedition to the Interior of Catalina Professor Glidden collected the skeletons of 3,781 Indians. The largest he found was of a mtin 9 feet 2 inches tall. Tractically all the male adults were of gigantic stature, averaging around 7 feet in height.' One of the curator's chief problems was to dry the skulls, which he found burled In damp sand near the water's edge. Great care had to be taken that they did not crumple whan exp'-'"''"slo the air. In the daytime he wou e them In rows In front of his teu At nlp.lit he covered them with tarpaulin to keep out the dampness. One evening Phliip K. Wrigley, of Chicago, whose father, William Wrigley, Jr., owns Catalina Island, visited the expedition's leader. Wrigley had been on a strenuous wild mountain goat hunt and ftopped by to ask how Professor Glidden was getting on. "Fine," replied the professor, and pulled away the tarpaulin. The revelation was startling 1S7 human skulls, staring grimly at Mr. Wrigley in the moonlight. The whole slgiiifioane" of the finds just related has not yet been worked out by anthropoUpi.-;t-s. Iir.t the establish-ntent as fact tit Uk old idory of a fail-race of giants In America Is causing a new leaf to bo written into the text books. It may r -ult fn-illy in a revision of our idea.-, as to where the white race or!f.-inateri and a3 to hw thm primeval races reached what is called the New World. :.- ..I. Inc. Cr-at 1 0IIl mm i-iUiri R fhii R rvel.)

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