The Bend Bulletin from Bend, Oregon on October 1, 1963 · Page 3
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The Bend Bulletin from Bend, Oregon · Page 3

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Bend, Oregon
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Tuesday, October 1, 1963
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Page 3
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uir. or Omm., r The Bulletin, Tuesday, October 1, 1963 Briefs Tonight at 8 o'clock meetings will be held as follows: Pine Forest Grange, Grange Hall; Mccracken Circle, First Christian CWF, with Mrs. Wayne Hamilton, 504 Congress Street; Faculty Dames, Kingston School auditorium; Kawata Circle, Methodist WSCS, with Mrs. Paul Reynolds, 3.'!5 E. Lafayette Avenue. It. and Mrs. Ralph W. Vargas of Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., are parents of a boy, born at Harrison Village. The baby weighed 8 pounds, 14 ounces, and has been named Christopher Otis. Mrs. Vargas is the former Anne Lammers, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Otis S. Lammers of Bend. The Vargases also have a year-old daughter, Elii-abeth Anne. DagrM of Honor will meet tonight at 8 o'clock, in Norway Hall. Mrt. Adelbert Skaggs, 1245 Milwaukee Avenue, will be hostess to the Six Corners Extension Unit Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. Miss Joan Hawes, Bend, has been elected president of the freshman class of 19 girls, at Emanuel Hospital School of Nursing In Portland. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hawes, 1215 Milwaukee Avenue. She registered at the school a week ago. Golden Age Club will meet Wednesday at the clubhouse, E. Fifth Street and Glenwood Drive. Doors will open at 12 noon, and the meeting will start at 1 p.m. There will be games and refreshments. Here and Xhert- " ' ) I u , IpjL u il I; " ; h, I J I $ s$ fill.' t-4S 4s,f ' ! lot made at a regular meeting Thursday, October 3, at 8 p.m. at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Stacy, Bend-Burns Highway. Bend Women's Golf Club will have a luncheon meeting Wednesday at 1 p.m., at the clubhouse. There will be a business meeting for election of officers and committee reports. Mrs. W. A. Lack-jiff t rhairnifm of the luncheon committee, assisted by Mrs. Carl ! auxiliary, Veter- F. F.rir-k&nn Mrs C. V.. Skinner ! ans of Foreign Wars, will hold and Mrs. Dick Martin. j regular meetings Thursday, Oc- tober 3, at 8 p.m. at the VFW Marvin 0. McManmon, electric- j Hall. Auxiliary members are to lan's male fireman In the U.S. ! lake cookies for the White City Navy, is serving aboard the anti-1 hospital box, and are reminded of mihmarinA airi-raft carrier 1ISS ! a hospital sewing meeting on will meet Wednesday at 8 pm., in the district court room of the Deschutes County courthouse. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lytle, 909 E. Tenth Street, were hosts the past two days to Mr. and Mrs. Orlin Lett, Myrtle Point. Mr. and Mrs. Lett had recently returned from a three-and-a-half - month tour of Europe, including a tour behind tho Berlin Wall. Mrs. Lett, a public school teacher, is Mrs. Lytle's cousin. Alcoholics Anonymous w'ill meet at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday in the basement of the First Lutheran Church. Mrs. Fred Hodecker will be hostess to the Mid-Oregon Music Teachers Club, Thursday, October 3, at 9:30 a.m. at her home in Redmond. All music teachers In the area are invited. A regular meeting of the Eastern Star Extension Unit will be Thursday, October 3, at 10 a.m. at the Eastern Star Grange Hall. Carl E. Taylor, machinist's mate second class in the U.S. Navy, returned to Norfolk, Va., early in September aboard the attack aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, after spending seven months in tlia Mediterranean. Taylor is the "; of Mr. and Mrs. George E. Taylor Sr., 738 S. Ninth Street, Redmond. First Lutheran Church Ladies Aid will meet Thursday October ( &raM 3. at 2 p.m. in the Fireside Roomi ' of the church. Members of Esther j BAulle, W,rl ,r , . . , Circle will bo hostesses. , As Ule result,of fund-ratsuig of- ! forts over a three-year period, Officer nominations for the Pi-jthe Dcsdiutes County Humane Kearsarge, which recently spent several days in Kahodate. a small Japanese port rarely visited by U.S. ships. McManmon is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John McManmon, Burns Star Route. Tuesday, October 8. Following the Thursday meetings, refreshments will be served by Mrs. Lydia Cooper and Mrs. George Mc-Quinn. TO REPLACE POUND Jess Smith views progress at Deschutes County Humane Society's animal shelter, under construction on Skyline Road. Smith, county dog warden, is society president. Group is contributing fund-raising effort, for maintenance of new facility, Deschutes County Humane Society starts work on animal shelter on Skyline Road quisition of funds. It Is hoped that the shelter will be ready for use at least by spring, officers said. Hie goal Is to provide care for foundling animals which now go to the (xnind, and to hold them for a long enough period that a maximum number can bo placed in homes. Ait area has also teen designated for an animal cemetery, in which pet owners may buy plots. This is to be planted to lawn. Provision is being made for future extension of the building. Windows are to he coverrd on the outside with heavy mesh wire, and possibly bars, as a safeguard against vandalism. Some of the material for the building was donated, according to Jess Smith, Humane Society president, lcslie Lucas, Bond, is the builder. 2 Boise papers sold to Midwest publishing firm BOISE, Idaho (UPD-Purchase of the Boise morning and evening newspapers by Federated Publications of Battle Creek, Mich., was announced today by James L. Brown, publisher. John A. Scott, who has been publisher of the Lafayette (Ind.) Journal and Courier, a federated newspaper, will succeed Brown, The two Idaho newspapers transferred to the Midwest group today are the Idaho Daily Statesman (morning) with a circulation of 38,000 and the Idaho Evening Statesman, circulation 12,000. The Sunday circulation is 47.000. "For reasons of health and age It has become necessary for me to relinquish the responsibility o( publishing the Statesman news papers," Brown's announcement said. He was personally associated In his early newspaper career, the announcement continued, with Robert B. Miller, president of tho Federated Newspapers, and with Louis A. Weil Jr.'s family. Weil is executive vice president. Scott, the new Boise publisher who took over today, is a retired Marine Corps brigadier general. He was also previously mayor of South Bend, Ind. J ir Mid Oiit t of Itospitaif BEND New patients at St. Charles Me morial Hospital are Darwin K. Cornford, son of Sidney E. Corn- ford, 1531 E. Fourth; Herbert Wilcox, 215 Hunter; Mark Noakcs, son of Frank Noakes, 805 Columbia; Mrs. Lawrence Rametes, Gilchrist; Mrs. Archie Owen, Crescent: Mrs. Charles Speck, Redmond; Mrs. Goldie Nielsen, 725 Lava Road; Carroll Sanborn, 1205 Baltimore; Mrs. Clarence Smith, 1230 Hartford; Vern Ro- chek, Gilchrist; Donald J. Hamilton, Prineville; Mrs. W. L. Mahaf-fcy, Route 2, Bend; Mrs. Francis Langcle, Redmond. Patients dismissed were Mark Noakes, Lynda E. Owen, Darwin Nicklas, Phvllis Grindle, Mrs. T. H. Olea, William B. Packard, Raymond Clark, Edward Ny-strom, Mrs. Francis Maracich. Butte Farm Bureau will be Socie'y has started work on its animal sneuer, on aityiino ltoaa. The facility, on two and a half acres of land given by Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Schuman, is just outside the Bend City limits. The organization now has approximately $3,000 for the project. This is enough, officers say, to put up a 20 x 32-foot pimic? block building and to install five individually fenced outside runways. Proceeds from a rummage side, to continue tomorrow at the former location of Superior Cafe, on Bond Street, will also be used for the project. Of the $3,000 now on hand, approximately $1700 was raised The interior of the building will be divided Into two principal compartments, one to contain cages for dogs, the other for cats, kittens and puppies. The animals are to be given access to the ;un-ways in daylight hours. There will be a small space in the building for an admittance area and office. Tho facility will be staffed partly by volunteers at first, with the possibility of a full-time custodian dependent upon future ac- i JUST NEON SIGN I through rummage sales, cash Sagabrushers Art Society will i PORTLAND (UP1I Portland i contributions and membership meet Wednesday at 7:30 p.m., at j Fire Bureau trucks on their way I fees. The City of Bend and Des-the gallery, 851 Roosevelt Avenue, j to a reported blaze at the Port- chutes County have provided as-There will he a lesson for begin-; land Heart and Convalescent Hos-1 sistance. ners, with Dot Hamre in charge. 1 nilal returned to their stations Tile shelter will serve the en-All who are interested are invit- Monday night when the dispatcher I tire county, officers say. The plan ed. , said: is to eliminate the present dog I "Hold down your sirens. It's a I pound at the Bend city dump, Jay H. Upton post and auxili- j neon sign on the side of the when the new building is com-ary. Disabled American Veterans, i building." I pleted. DKG installs new members Helen Peak, Bend, and Arleta Ferne Jones, Prineville, are new members of Delta Kappa Gamma, honorary society of women educators. They were installed into membership of Sigma chapter, at a meeting recently at the home of Velma Buckingham. Nadine Harmon and Faye Crawford were assistant hostesses. Other Bend members attending were Valborg Fisher, president; Mary Thompson, Marie Broster-hous, Bonnie Hollinshead. Violet Dahlin, Ardinelle Bain and Carrie Scott. PREDICTS WARM WEATHER WASHINGTON (UPD The weather bureau predicts warmer than usual weather this month except In the eastern half of the nation where temperatures are expected to dip below normal. October's chills will be felt sooner in stales bordering the Atlantic, tho Gulf of Mexico and the Appalachian Mountains. Redmond firm offers low bid A Redmond firm, the Mann Construction Co., offered the apparent low bid on public facilities at three of four sites around Ice Harbor Dam Reservoir on the Snake River northwest of Walla Walla, Wash. The Redmond firm was apparent low bidder for a levee and landing site on the north sliore at $37,371, on facilities in the Walker Canyon at $6,000, and on facilities in the south shore in Fishook Canyon Park at $79,240. Seaside dropped from court suit PORTLAND (UPI)-The City of Seaside has been dismissed as a defendant in a Federal Court suit arising from the 1962 Seaside La bor Day riots. The complaint seeking $76,000 in damages was filed in August by Richard Wicks, 20, and his mother, Mrs. Ray F. Wicks, of Eugeno. It alleged Wicks was arrested by police without commit ting a violation, Injured by a night slick and jailed without medical aid. Nation on right track, Douglas tells audience PORTLAND (UPD - Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas said Monday he was glad this na tion was on the right track In combating racial discrimination. Justice Douglas, accompanied by his young wife, spoke at the opening of reading week at Lewis and Clark College. He said, "I'm sure that If this country had tried to segregate Jews and keep all of them in one school, everyone would have agreed years and years ago that it was unjust discrimination," HOMES IN DEMAND BELFAST, North Ireland (UPD The Northern Ireland govern ment, noting the tourist business which Eire has promoted around its Kennedy homestead, said It plans to buy the family residences of two previous U. S. Presidents. It said the father of President Chester Arthur once lived at Cul-lybackey and the grandfather of President Woodrow Wilson lived at Strabane. Both men later emigrated to America, government officials snld, but their old homes still are standing. Mental Health group sets bid for members The Central Oregon Mental Health Association is launching its 1963-64 membership campaign, according to Dr. J. E. Hyatt of Bend, president. The group will sponsor seven public meetings again this year, he said, and will continue Its program of study and assistance. The membership fee Is $3 an nually. Mrs. J. U. Dahlin, 1504 W. Third Street, Bend, is membership chairman. The association has tentatively selected "Alcoholism" as the top-. Ic for the public meetings. It will ' continue to provide public speak. ! ers for other groups, and will sponsor an intensive study of reC gional mental health needs, Dr." Ilyatt said. Other officers, elected recently! are Dr. Evan L. Jones, Prineville,-1 and the Rev. Lawrence Ferguson Madras, vice presidents: Mary Howden, Prineville, secretary,!' and Carrie Scott, Bend, treasurer. - Mrs. Randall Moore, Bond, is Christmas gift chairman. Committee members and area repre--sentatlves are Darlyne Chacarte' gul, Jofferson county, and the. Rev. James Egly, Redmond. II CASCADE ' m h PRINTING INC. I w "Printing To Do? Call Lou!" PHONE 382-1963 I 0DEM MED0 DRIVE-IN Redmond, Ore. NOW . . . Thru Tuesday First Showing in Area . . . 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