Lead Daily Call from Lead, South Dakota on June 4, 1981 · Page 1
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

Lead Daily Call from Lead, South Dakota · Page 1

Publication:
Location:
Lead, South Dakota
Issue Date:
Thursday, June 4, 1981
Page:
Page 1
Start Free Trial
Cancel

3r ' ! Si c 'a " ;- ' . vi , - r 07th Year (0$P$ iv-utt Vol. 87, No. 251 OMICM!' toulh Mlln.UMIDiniiniMIIM'lW Ikm CiMt Potttt rm4 at Lm4. to VIM Thursday, June 4, 1981 Country singer brings film crew to town jwnwtMT rMTcrifcCK IbULS II LIKE IT WILL BE on television commercials for K-TE LL Records' new album, "Kickin' Country." Here he was supposed to be sitting on the stool at the Old Style, but Paycheck is an artist, and sometimes he likes towing It. Sawmill won't By PAT DOIIBS Call-Times Writer No decision has been made on which railroad, if any, will haul the lumber and byproducts from Pope and Talbot's sawmill in Spearfish. But then, the plant won't begin major production until sometime in October, says plant manager Jim Rarick. In Wednesday's address to the Lerd Chamber of Commerce, Rarick said the rebuilding of the fire-damaged mill property purchased from Homestake Mining Company went into the construction stage about a month ago. The undamaged planner has been restarted, and combined with construction people now on site, Pope and Talbot has 80 people employed. That number will grow to 120 in two or three weeks as materials for the new main building begin arriving, Rarick said. Job applicants are being screened through the state Job Service office in Spearfish. Rarick said the sawmill won't be hiring too many more loggers and mill workers until September or October, when the plant is expected to go on line. Rarick, formerly with Homestake Forest Products, estimated 170 people would be employed at the mill 'and at ETSI not only threat to By Kill Harlan Call-Times Writer SPEARFISH - If the 20,000 acre-feet of water per year that the ETSI coal slurry pipeline will use sounds like a lot of water, then proposals that could draw a total of 278,000 acre-feet per year from Wyoming, Montana and South Dakota should be studied carefully Mike Strub of the Sixth District Council told a gathering of about 50 people in Spearfish Wednesday evening. An acre-foot is the amount of water needed to cover an acre of water to a depth of one foot. Rapid City, for instance, uses between 12,000 and 15,000 acre-feet per year. Wednesday's program was sponsored by the Lawrence County Soil Conservation District and was intended to both educate the public about groundwater supplies and explain a project that will measure in detail groundwater flow in the Black Hills. Kathy Peters and Lee Case, Governor presented honorary PIERRE, S.D. (AP) It took him a lot longer than most people, but Gov. Bill Janklow finally got something Wednesday night he's wanted for years a high school diploma. The diploma was only honorary, but the governor was still happy. Janklow, 41, dropped out of high school at age 16 to join the Marine DRIVER'S EO RECEIVES A CAR. Greg Calabro (a the wheel), driver's ed director, Is seen receiving trie keys to a fully equipped Ford LTD from Bub Roberts of Deadwood Ford. Don Quaschnlckof the Lead-Deadwood school board looks on. Deadwood Ford is providing the car at less than cost for the summer program. begin major production until least that many more will be working in the woods when the mill begins major production. Beginning the $17 million project "has really been a shot in the arm" for the local economy, Rarick said. "It's been really good for Spearfish nad it's really been good for us." The new mill will be built in two phases. The first, including construction of the main structure, should be complete in mid-October. The second is scheduled for completion by Jan. 1982, Rarick said. General construction and electrical contracts have been awarded to Spearfish firms, while moving a 'debarker' was awarded to an experienced Idaho company, according to Rarick. "The main building encompasses an area bigger than a football field by itself," Rarick said. "And the equipment we're installing is referred to as 'state of the art'. That means it is the best of its kind. When we're done, technologically, there won't be another mill like it in the United States, he explained." "We're proud of the sawmill. We think it's something the area can be proud of too," stated Rarick. Word of the plans have spread hydrologists with the United States Geological Survey, joined Mike Strub for the presentation. "Trie situation with groundwater in the United States today is similar to the energy situation of a few years ago," Strub said. "People are just beginning to wake up and say, 'What happened? How did we get in this mess?" Groundwater is that water which flows through "aquifers," layers of gravel or porous rock that provide a medium through which water migrates. Interest has increased in aquifers around the' Black Hills because of the ETSI pipeline, which will tap water in the Madison aquifer, a major supplier of water for many Black Hills communities. Strub said that, although ETSI probably wouldn't affect Lawrence County ground water as much as other counties, there are 19 energy projects Corps. After leaving the service, he persuaded officials at the University of South Dakota to admit him without a high school degree, by scoring well on admission tests and promising to leave college if he failed to maintain a "C" average. Janklow went on to earn a college throughout the industry and Rarick said Pope and Talbot has "a list a mile long" of requests to tour the facility when it is completed. The computerized technology Rarick spoke of, will allow Pope and Talbot to produce 300,000 board feet a day. That equates to 72 million board feet a year. By comparison, the old Homestake mill could only produce SO million annually, he said. The housing market slump won't affect production levels because the mill is being designed to cut to one-inch widths, while housing materials are usually two inch, Rarick said. "If the housing market does come back, then we will really be in the drivers seat," Rarick said. After studying their marketing options, company officials have changed their minds about shipping the Spearfish sawmill's products west. Most of the lumber, and possibly the woodchips, will be transported east and south. "We're the last timber between the eastern markets and the West Coast," explained Rarick. "We don't have the tree stands the West Coast has, no way. But we can compete with them because of transporation costs." aquifer water supply being considered for eastern Wyoming and Montana everything from liquifaction plants to power plants. And four more coal slurry pipelines are in the planning stages, said Strub. He told the group that not air of the projects . will necessarily be undertaken, but the fact that they are being considered warrants close study by local people. Kathy Peters expained some basic hydrology. The two important concepts she stressed were the hydrologic cycle and the hydrologic budget. The cycle is simply the way water circulates in and out of an area. Water is never lost, she said, but it can migrate at different rates and in different directions. Changes in the cycle can affect local water supplies. The hydrologic budget is the amount of water that is available in a given area, and it is possible to "overdraw" the water account. Strub said that even massive diploma diploma and then a law degree. No one had told the Janklow of the honor in advance. "Fellow classmates," a smiling Janklow told the cheering crowd. "My God, I got a high school diploma!" Janklow was then handed a green cap like those worn by his fellow graduates. By Bill Harlan Call-Time Writer DEAPWOOD Singer Johnny Paycheck and a Canadian television crew spent Wednesday afternoon shooting in the Old Style Saloon No. 10. The CKY-TV crew from Winnipeg was shooting a commercial for a K-TEL record called "Kickin' Country," an album featuring "outlaw" country singers like Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard and, naturally, Johnny Paycheck. True to the outlaw tradition, when the television crew finished shooting. Paycheck started. He put a bullet hole in a picture on the wall. fall The Spearfish sawmill currently does not have a railhead, but officials from the Portland, Ore. headquarters are investigating freightcosts on the Burlington Northern spur from Deadwood and the Chicago and Northwestern line from Whitewood as possibilities. . A decision on which line, if any, is not expected until about a month before the mill begins major production, Rarick said. For the time being, all of the products are being trucked out. In other chamber business, President Gene Lindberg reported several meetings have been held by the board of directors of both Lead and Deadwood chambers to complete paperwork on the recently agreed to merger. The necessary bylaw changes have completed the preliminary stages. In the board of directors meeting earner Wednesday, Bill Waugh was named as the new vice president. He succeeds Chuck Wuttke, who recently left the area. Pat Dobbs was voted to fill the vacant board position. Lindberg further announced that summer meetings for the Lead chamber will be called on an "as needed" basis. aquifers can be "used up." If Madison is pumped dry, he said, the the re-charge period would be about 150 to 160 years. Lee Case explained a study that will get underway this summer. With an initial $20,000 grant from the Black Hills Soil Conservation District a the USGS, a preliminary study will be done to determine how to go about creating a detailed map -of groundwater in the Black Hills. The Summer 1981 study will look at water quality and quantity, recharge, and the effects of septic systems in Piedmont. The study will also outline a proposed "digital model" of groundwater flow in the Black Hills. The final study, which has not yet been funded, will take three years and cost $630,000. That study will carry out the recommendations of this summer's work. The purpose is to devlop data that local planners can use, data that could be important, Strub said, in light of potential energy development. Weather Clear to partly cloudy tonight and Friday. Lows tonight upper 40s to low 50s. Highs Friday low 80s. Northwest winds decreasing to 10-15 mph tonight and northerly 10-20 mph Friday. Chance of thunderstorms Sunday and Monday. Gold Prices By the Associated Press Selected world gold prices Thur sday: London: morning fixing $463.75, $11.75; afternoon fixing $462.50, $13.00. Paris: afternoon fixing $531.18, off off off $6 28 Frankfurt: $463.98, off $11.05. Zurich: late afternoon fixing $461.00 bid. off $12.00; $464.00 asked. Handy & Harman: only daily quote $462.50, off $13.00. Engelhard: only daily quote $462.50, off $13.00. Engelhard: only daily quote fabricated $481.00, off $13.52. Silver: $10,020 per troy ounce. Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Pluma school A smoky fire at the Pluma School this morning caused mostly minor damage. The blaze was contained in a small storage room adjacent to the basement boilers, but smoke filled the entire facility. Deadwood Fire Chief Lynn Gerving said the fire apparently originated among paint and cleaning supplies, however the cause of the fire has not But that was at the end of the afternoon. First, there was a commercial to be shot. K-TEL is the Canadian company that always interrupts "The Monster That Insulted Manila" on the late late show to tell you about the incredible album offer with dozens of your favorite artists. The company was founded 15 years ago by a young man named Phillip Kives. At first, Kives warehoused albums in his mother's basement. Now the company operates in 21 foreign countries (including the U.S.). K-TEL is especially big in the Balkans and central Europe. And the man responsible for most of the K-TEL commercials made over the last seven years is creative director Bob Shipley. He needed a true-life western bar for the "Kickin Country" spot but was unsatisfied with some proposed sites in Minneapolis. But a K-TEL executive had been to Deadwood, so several months ago Shipley contacted the Old Style's Gary Keehn, Keehn sent pictures, and the deal was struck. Paycheck, Shipley and the CKY-TV crew arrived in Deadwood on Tuesday from all over the country. . Wednesday morning the television people ran their cables, cameras and lights into the bar and set up a mini-studio. Talent call was at 1:00 p.m. Shipley was looking for "Kickin' Country" types to sit at the bar while Paycheck pitched the album, and Keehn had been joking all week that he was running "Gary's Rent-A-Redneck." The extras were chosen and shooting was underway by about 1:30. Commercials are not directed like Hamlet. Shipley and his K-TEL colleague, Jerome Bowie, had reviewed the "script" with Johnny Paycheck Tuesday. They told him what they wanted to say and asked him how he'd say it. The commercial, said Shipley, was in Johnny Paycheck's own words. The final script products were magic markered on to the back of flattened beer case cartons, and the shooting -began. In the first of five shots Paycheck Paycheck strolled along the bar at the Old Style, talking to the television audience. The soundman: "Tapes rolling. We've got speed." Director Shipley: "Quiet please. And ... action!" Johnny Paycheck: "Yeah, you're right. It's me, the old outlaw. I've teamed up with Willie Nelson, Moe and ... and ... Take two. "Yeah, you're right. It's me, the old .outlaw. And I'm here to tell you that I've teamed up with Willie Nelson and (pause) Mutt and Jeff ... Goll darn, I'll get it, I'll get it." "OF COURSE I LIKE COUNTRY MUSIC JOHNNY!" Joe Barcelona tries to look unperturbed after singer Johhny Paycheck's attempt to hit the balloon. Note new bullet hole just left of center In the picture behind the pair. (Staff photo by Bill Harlan.) building damaged by fire been determined. A state Fire Marshal was expected at the scene later Thursday. Students attending the Black Hills Special Services Cooperative had left for a field trip at Mt. Rushmore approximately an hour before the fire was reported. Three consultants remaining at the building noticed smoke coming up through the floor Take three. "Yeah, you're right. It's me, the old outlaw. And I've teamed up with Willie Nelson, Moe and Joe, Jerry Jeff and Merle Haggard and a whole lot of other cowboys to bring you the best in country music." Bob Shipley: "Excellent John. O.K. let's do it again." And so on, for three hours and many retakes. Paycheck is a consummate performer, and the Old Style was a packed house most of the afternoon. Johhny is 5' 6", maybe 5' 7", a wiry man with a tattoo on one arm and not an excess of teeth. He was dressed simply plain brown cowboy hat with the snakeskin band, white sport shirt, brushed cotton jeans and shiny black cowby boots. But in front of a crowd Paycheck looks big. All afternoon he was the center of attention, joking on the ou takes and making friends with tourists men, women and children alike. He loaned his cowboy hat to Tim Verhey of Vermillion, age 8. Later, when the television crew needed to set lights in front of the jukebox, Tim put on Paycheck's red headband and acted as stand-in. When the job was done Paycheck's security man, Cass, paid Tim $5, and Johnny congratulated him for a job well done. Tim's eyes lit up. After Paycheck finished shooting the commercial Joe Barcelona, Dead-wood's world champion quick draw artist, gave a shooting exhibition of his own. Paycheck used to quick draw as a hobby, and Barcelona offered to let him try out his special pistol. The scene was the back of the Old Style. Paycheck took pistol in hand. He squinted at his target, a balloon about fifteen feet away on a two-by-four, three feet off the floor. Paycheck took aim. He fired. And the glass shattered in a historic picture of the old Spearfish Canyon train. The bullet hole was nearly dead center in the picture. The crowd roared. Paycheck grinned sheepishly and offered to pay for damages. But his signature on the picture, underneath the bullet hole ("Johnny Paycheck did this."), might have increased the photo's value. Later Wednesday night Paycheck played with the band at the Old Style and had a good 'ol time in general. The K-TEL crew will return to Winnipeg, then fly to Los Angeles for post production work on the commercial. Out of the 45 minutes of videotape, Bob Shipley will make a couple 30 second commercials. He wasn't sure when they would be aired. Paycheck flies on to concerts in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi and the Lone Star Cafe in New York. p . -. - about 10 a.m., according to one of the consultants Jack Kreitzer. Deadwood and Lead fire units extinguished the fire in about 45 minutes. Crews were still on the scene at noon with smoke extractors. A damage estimate has not been made by Lead-Deadwood school officials, who were at the scene shortly after it was reported.

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 19,600+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the Lead Daily Call
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free