The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on March 18, 1931 · Page 11
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 11

Publication:
Location:
Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Wednesday, March 18, 1931
Page:
Page 11
Start Free Trial
Cancel

The Upper Des Moines-Eepublican, March 18, 1931 WEED ERADICATION CAMPAIGN_PLANNED ies of Weed Meetings to jbe Held Throughout the County. WNTYFOUR-H CLUB MEETING. he County Shipping Association Officers Will Meet at Fenton March 19. Thompson to Talk. )A county wide weed eradication pampaign was planned at a meeting tleld In the court house at Algona ftst Wednesday, March 11. The board ( 'of supervisors, township trustees, weed {.Commissioners, and farm bureau repre- i-«entatlves attended. R. H. Porter of f the Iowa State College extension ser- ?«ce outlined the program as followed |*y eighteen counties last year, which %was so successful that similar plans /are this year being made In twenty- |elght counties of the state. * A series of weed meetings will be iheld throughout the county for the |nurpose of a general discussion of the ghabits of weeds and weed eradication and control measures that are being found efficient. Through this series of ; meetings it is hoped that many land- fiords and farmers will become Inter\ fisted in the control of noxious weeds in order to encourage the maximum amount of weed control effort with a minimum of weed law admlnstration. The probable arrangement of meet- Ings is listed below, but many need to be changed in some localities, in which case special notice will be given In the localities affected. General discussion will be held at these meetings on the habits of weeds, seeding habits, life of seed in soil and methods of eradication including cropping methods, report on chemical spraying results and use of smother crops. Meetings scheduled are as follows: LuVerne and Sherman, LuVerne hall, Friday, March 20, afternoon. Lotts Creek and Whittemore, Whittemore hall, Monday, March 23, afternoon. Cresco, Irvington, Plum Creek and Union, court house, Algona, Tuesday, oerman, center school, Thursday April 2, evening. Wesley, center school, Friday, Apr! 3, evening:. Buffalo and Portland, Titonka, Saturday, April 4, evening. Fow-H Club Meeting. E. M. Wright, field secretary of the Iowa State Dairy association will be lit the county next Tuesday evening March 24, for a county FOur-H club meeting at the Legion hall in Algona Mr. Wright has pictures of the Story of Iowa's champion dairy calf club members that he Will show to the group. The meeting is for all clut leaders of the county, officers of calf club groups, farmers, breeders, cream- erymen or others Interested In the extent and possibilities of Four-H club work. County Shipping Association, The county shipping association officers will meet at Fenton, Thursday afternoon at the town hall. ' Sam Thompson of the extension service ol Iowa State College, will speak on the livestock outlook for 1933. and will give an analysis of shipping association records. There will be a representative of the state shippers present and they are attempting to secure the presence of one of the officers of the North Iowa Cooperative Sales Agency at Mason City. J. E. Harner of Swea City is president of the county association and will preside at the meeting. District Conference. There is a district farm bureau conference at Mason City today. Group meetings were to be held in the morning for presidents, county • agents, treasurers, voting directors and organization chairmen of the counties. This afternoon there was a general meet- Ing at which R. F. O'Donnell, manager of the Iowa. Livestock Marketing Corporation and President Charles Hearst of the Iowa Farm Bureau were to talk Frank Ryerson of Burt, Kossuth county president; C. C. Scharlach, Al- ?ona, treasurer, and M. L. Johnson of Swea City, voting director, and C. R. Schoby, of Algona .chairman of the organization committee, were among those who planned to attend. German Lutheran Church. Corner of Wooster and Elm St. German services will be conducted ;he coming Sunday forenoon at ten- ;hirty o'clock. , Lenten services will be held next Wednesday evening at seven-thirty. The confirmation of the catechumens will take place a week from Sunday, as on Palm Sunday. Strangers and \tisitors are always leartily welcome.—P. Braner, pastor. i FOTJB CORNEE NEWS.S Burt and Portland, Burt, Saturday, March 28, evening. Swea and Harrison, Swea City hall, Monday, March 30, afternoon. Eagle, center school, Monday, March 30, evening. Ledyard, consolidated school, Tuesday, March 31, afternoon. Hebron, center school, 31,..ejre&ing. Tuesday, March 24, afternoon. Prairie, St. Benedict, Wednesday, March 25, afternoon. Fenton and Burt, Lone Rock hall, Thursday, March 26, afternoon. Garfleld, center school, Thursday, March 26, evening. Gaunt, cojisolldated 1 school, Friday, •' Mlss Clara Schultz entertained the March 27, afternoon. |Larkln club Friday afternoon. The John Riches installed an electric light plant last week at their farm northwest of Hobarton. Miss Mildred Robinson returned home last week after spending several months near Spirit Lake, where she had been doing house work for a friend. The Pour Corner Mothers and Daughters club will meet this week on Thursday with Mrs. Chester Robinson. Roll c jokes. There was no .school at Union district number six, or the Arthur Cruikshank school Monday due to the funeral of the grandmother of the teacher, Mrs. Ed. Genrich. Miss Irene Walker spent last week at the Roy Lowman home helping the latter. The Lowmans moved a week ago Tuesday to the home of Roy's father, Lewis Lowman, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Quentin Bjustrom were entertained at supper last week Thursday evening at the Roy Bjustrom home at Hobarton to help the former Mr. Bjustrom. celebrate his birthday. Mi*, and Mrs. Archie Walker and their son, Robert, and Mrs. Edith Rich spent last Thursday at the Herman Llndeman home at Dakota City. Mrs. Llndeman was formerly Elsie Drayton of this community. ,..ejreng. __ ; ._ ,,',, -* aonxT Greenwood, ' Bancroft- school, Wednesday, April 1, afternoon. Lincoln; center school, Wednesday, April 1, evening. Seneca, consolidated school, Thursday, April 2, afternoon. SEED OATS I have for sale a quantity of "105" seed oats. TMs is extra fine oats. MIKE LOSS Phone 18F12 Algona, Iowa. We Have Changed All That By Herbert Quick and Elena Stepanoff Mac Mahon t Copyright by The Bobbs-Merrill Co. WNU Service THE STORY CHAPTER X.—Still hardly nble to comprehend the situation, Musla listens to Lorls 1 compliments on her appearance. When he attempts to embrace her she snatches a sword from the wall, but he disarms her, though gently. Then he convinces the horrified girl of her mother's unnatural Iden of sacrificing the daughter's honor for the son's life, tells her he has no power to release Ilya but will do what he can, and dismisses her, her beauty nnd bravery having- made a deep Impression on him. CHAPTER XI.—The two women walk home, Musla with a natural feeling of aversion for her mother. Mrs. Kras- sln, still determined Musla shall make the sacrifice she demands, attempts, without talking to her, to Induce her to accept Lorls' • attentions, convinced the commissar will save Ilya If she does so, and the girl feels she can no longer live under the same roof with her mother. (Continued from Last Wednesday.) 40-tf CITY PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY. ATTORNEYS AT LAW T. P. Harrington L. J. Dickinson HARRINGTON & DICKINSON ATTORNEYS AT LAW Rooms 212-14 First Nat'l Bank Blk. ALGONA, IOWA J. L. BONAR ATTORNEY AT LAW Collections will receive prompt attention. ALGONA, IOWA W. B. QUARTON H. MILLER ATTORNEYS AT LAW Office over Kossuth County State Bank Office Phone, 427 ALGONA, IOWA J, W. Sullivan S. E. McMahon L. E. Llnnan SUttlVAN, MoMAHON & UNNAN ATTORNEYS AT LAW Office over County Savings Bank ALGONA, IOWA. B. J. VAN NESS & G. W. STIIXMAN LAWYERS Office over Iowa State Bank. Phone 213-W Algona, Iowa. L. A. WINKEL ATTORNEY AT LAW Office In Quinby Building. Phone 180. ALOONA, IOWA Gaylord D. Shumway Edward D. Kelly SHUMWAY & KELLY ATTORNEYS AT LAW Office over Quinby & Krause Building P. V. JANSE, M. D. PHYSICIAN & SURGEON Office on South Dodge St. Phone No.—Res. 366; Office 668. Algona, Iowa. Phone 68. E. C. McMAHON Attorney at Law Office over Quinby & Krause Bldg. Algona, Iowa Phone 129 MORTICIAN I. M. MEKRITT Mortician & Funeral Director Phone No. 11 ALGONA, IOWA .., VETERINARIAN 476'B. L W. FOX, Veterinarian office at the old Dr. Bayers' Office Phone 475-W; Residence Will have man at office at PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS KENEPICK & CRAWFORD Office Phone 300 Residence Phones: Dr. Kenefick, 57 Dr. Crawford, 115 C. H. CRETZMEYER PHYSICIAN & SURGEON Glasses Fitted Office in J. Galbraith Block. Residence one block east and one block south of office. No cans made after 9:30 p. m. ALGONA, IOWA. Office Phone, 310. Residence, 444. DR. W. D, ANDREWS. Osteopathlc Physician & Surgeon Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat, Obstetrics. Located over Hub Recreation Parlor. Phnoe Office 187, Rsedicene, 688. ALGONA, IOWA. INSURANCE CITY PROPERTY LOANS FARM LOANS REAL ESTATE INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS CUNNINGHAM & LACY Phone 598 107 W. State St. ALGONA, IOWA. ALGONA INSURANCE AGENCY Reliable Insurance Service C. R. LABARRE AL FALKENHAINER Phone 55 First door north Iowa State Bank DENTISTS DR. II. M. OLSON DENTIST Gas or Novocalne used for extraction. Located over Chrlstensen Store. Phone: Business 166, Residence, 479 ALGONA, IOWA Quinby Bldg. DR. C. D. SCHAAP. DENTIST Algona, Icwa. Phone 133. GEORGE Ii. MILLER. GENERAL CONTRACTOR 610 South Dodge St. Phone 753 Algona, Iowa. She was very lonely, and tried all tlie little devices to which her life had accustomed her to pass awny the time. She opened the plnno, rested her fingers on the keys, and without striking a note, closed it, and went wandering about the great high-cell- Inged rooms. The piece she hud been about to play was one of llya's favorites. She had slept for many nights after their visit to Lorls, and now retired early, but not always to sleep. During the days she had been in a relaxed 'and passive state; but now it seemed as if It were her imperative duty to rise and do something. Musla was letting things drift In this awful storm; and the thought tormented her. She saw nothing clearly. But thoughts, approaching visions, crowded her brain. Ilya, Vladimir, mother—the Ideas were twisting, plaiting in chaos. Loris, too—she remembered him, with his handsome white hands as soft as her own, his small curled-up mustache almost brushing her lips—a distant, Incomprehensible, persistent figure. "I am sure he can save Hya," she said, sitting up In bed and 'clasping her knees with her arms. "He Is their Idol—he must be; for see his superiority to the others! What he said about not having power was said in modesty; but he must have power. Compare him to Vllinskyl I must save Hya, and must see Lorls again; but saving™nyu"1vH'I 'LUi iJuuMu uiyr destiny. No matter how this great matter Is solved, I cannot live In the same house with my mother any more. My life Is spoiled. Where can I go? What can I do?" How still the house was t It frightened her. She was approaching hysteria; and she wondered if her mind were not giving away. She wondered what her mother was doing. Perhaps she was searching for more passages In books and papers with which to corrupt her daughter's mind. Musla softly slipped out of bed and softly went to her mother's door. It stood a little ajar, and a dim light was shining out along the floor In a broadening zone against the opposite wall of the passage. Musla paused before this opening and looked In. There was a faint light In the room, by which the girl could at flrst see nothing but a shrine over in the corner; but presently by the light of the tiny oil lamp burning before the shrine several orthodox ikons were revealed, and under them an Indistinct figure on the floor. It was her mother in her nightgown, kneeling in prayer. Musla watched for n long time, but she scarcely stirred. The girl was no philosopher, and this glimpse Into her mother's soul struck her with astonishment and wonder. She could not fathom the mystery of the female animal fighting for her offspring; and blindly endeavoring to use, at the same time, the weapons of the spirit, and of the world, the flesh and the devil against another child. The time mo.v come when Musla will understand this; but then she was too youtij; 15ut her hate lessened a little, as slu 1 t'ot this glimpse of the awful struggle in the soul of another. Slowly straightening her tired body the girl crept back to the loneliness of her room. her. It seetfiPo 1 To her TTiat anyone In the car might hear them. There was none of the waiting here, either, which had marked the former visit; for before she hnd become accustomed to the strangeness of waiting thus for this rayterlous mnn. he threw bnck the hanging, and leaving the doorway open behind him, stepped lightly into the room and stood as If waiting for her to explain the object of her call upon him. The Incredibly grotesque situation struck her: she quaked ns she thought of her being at the morcy of tills stronger clothed with such sinister po\vcr, and reputed to be In the hnliit of making such destructive use of it. She felt n chill nnd slilvorod. lie walked Over to her as If he understood her thoughts nnd feelings, and was rather amused at them. "So you came?" She thought the words Ironical, but there was no irony In his voice. "Please be seated," said he, with n gesture toward the divan. "I was wondering if you would not come. I thought you might. I wanted you to come." Her heart beat high with hope at his words. Why could lie have wished her to come, save to give her good news of Ilyn? "Then you have good news for me?" she exclaimed. "Good news—of my brother?" But there was no encouragement In his face in response to her query. There was disappointment In It, and Just a shade of the annoyance of a man who finds n conversation on matters of Interest to htm turned off upon things which are on old, old story— some of the annoyance of the official who has heard petitions and requests all day long, and wants to be rid of them. "No," he said shortly. "1 have no news at all on that matter. I am sorry. I want to help your brother, because he is your brother. I hope It will turn out, If I save him, that he 13 a little like his sister." He walked several times the length of the room while she waited for that which she thought he must bo prepar- 'Ing to say about Ilya. His words of compliment to her she hnd already forgotten. He was not thinking of Ilyn at all. He was pondering on his own situation, and hers, on tbe new conditions of their lives, of the truth of the saying that nobody may know what n day may bring forth, of the preciousness of this hour, nnd In his strange life, of every hour, of the necessity of doing in an hour what In other times might consume months or years. Of the Importance of cutting knots. He halted before her and looked down Into her eyes lifted pleadingly to his, nnd then he sat down by her side. "I loved you from tho first moment I saw you," said he eagerly. "This is no time—" said sh haughtily. "No time," he Interrupted, "fo waiting to woo; no time for wooing, thought of that before I spoke. D you remember the story of the mnn In the French revolution, the common fellow, who was bound face to fac to a lady of high birth, and thrown Togetlier Wffti fier fiU(r~the—river Though drowning, he fell In love with her, and thanked God for the grea privilege. I am like that. Even in this maelstrom I have fallen in lovi with you!" "This," said she, "—this is Insanity sir. You thought tho other day—" "I dishonored you in my thoughts,' he supplied for her. "Won't you par don me? I was misled—by circum stances and appearances. How could I know—I should have known at th llrst glance. But even when I mis judged you, I loved you—and I was angry. The thing seemed so base, am so beautiful. I would have taken you on any plane high or low—until aftei you—you repelled me. That lifted you up in the— I shall always keep that sword among my treasures. It made you known to me. If it—If anything could only make me known to you 1" Was there a half-smile on Musla's face at the remembrance? Her excitement was mounting higher every moment. "You have conquered my heart, my mind, my admiration, my love. I watched you ns you went away with —do not stay with her! I cannot fepugnnnt 16 Tier. She TeTt as "she had done when she took the sword In her hnnds; nnd yet her mind told her thnt she ought to be friendly with Loris, to show trust In him for Ilya's sake, nnd even for her own safety. But she could find no words In which to reply. She could not force herself to utter a syllable. A physical disgust for herself, for this mnn with whom she hnd come to plcnd, for her whole questionable position took possession of her. Ho watched her questlonlngly, nnd seemed to know what she felt: for rVWWWVW Bargains in Used Cars 1D2G Chevrolet coach II 1929 G cyl. Chcv. coach 5 Buick sedan [I '29 Model A Ford coach .1927 Chevrolet sedan CHAPTER XII From Master to Slave Sentries seemed stricken with blindness, as Musla wulUed along the railway platform, and then down on the cindered ground between the tracks on the occasion of her second visit to Lorls—but then, this was the second visit. His car had been moved along the siding nearer to the main line, and, as before, the way seemed to be always kept clear for It to move out of the yards and out of Kazan. A man In uniform pointed It out to her when she had paused In perplexity at Us having vanished from the spot where she remembered it to have stood before. When she reached the car, the guard, a different type of man from the one on duty that other day, waved his hand for her to enter without any petition on her part. It was now growing dark, and as she stepped into the corridor, which was brilliantly lighted, she found herself alone; and there was no one In the reception room, which was dark, save for light coming to from the outside about the curtains, and a gleam ghinlng from under the hanging across tbe doorway into tbe Inner room, heartbeats almost suffocated exist without you—you are everything!" There was In his voice and manner those elements which move the hearer; the heat of a powerful passion, in his tones the vibration which sways the passions of others, something that told of his feeling that he was staking much on this desperate appeal, something very tender and winning in the dark face bent toward her in the half- light. She? She lowered her eyes, and with her fingers played with her dress like a schoolgirl receiving her flrst proposal. Even under all the circumstances, such an avowal from such a man meant something to Musla. "I will do anything to win you," he went on. "I am capable of doing anything to win you. Who am I? You say I am a commissar of the Bol- slievlkl. Yes: I am just a Russian of some mind and some power shaken out of the old life, unsure of tomorrow, with no firm ground under my feet. I am Russia 1 I am a man who has lived long among people who have lost the sense of what is white, what black, what right, what wrong—I am a soul on trial, wandering In Chaos and Night. So are you. Who is not? Who Is not lost in this whirlpool, stirred up by Satan, of the elements of hell? Kings today—tomorrow dust ... I wish I had a little more time for making you love me!" Silence for a long time; It seemed to her a very, very long time. She had no Idea what to do. She had forgotten her errand for a moment in this bizarre crisis In her own affairs. Lorls started up and resumed his walk to and fro across the floor. "Can you believe and trust me?" he asked. He waited with his eyes fixed tenderly on her expressionless face. "Can you not love me a little?" She felt a sense of guilt ag the thought of her brother's peril, for her errand swept back into her consciousness ; and all at once this lovemaking, this man making love to her, became He Watched Her Questlonlngly, and Seemed to Know What She Felt. his expression changed. Anger (lushed his face—the nnger of love denied; and the cruelty of passion replaced the kind and gontlo tenderness of n moment ago. Passions IlUe his have filled the world with murders. He reached the divan with a stride and seized her hand. "Ahl" he said In n low, hoarse tone, his hands pressing hors until she winced. "You hnte me!" She compressed her pale lips, but uttered no word of denial or protest. Her passiveness provoked him, and he became the man of that former day. Who was this slip of n girl to trent with silence and contempt the man before whom so many trembled? Love, anger of love denied, and the pride which In such natures as his blows such anger to flame, combined to render him half Insane and wholly reckless—and to see her sit thus Impassive 1 He threw himself upon the divan beside her, took her In his arms, pressed her passionately to his breast, and kissed her—with the brutality of a cave man. And then he was calmed by the fact that she did not resist. With lips tightly closed she lay In his arms, calm, cold, Impassive. His storm of passion passed In a moment. "I am a brute!" he whispered, still holding the yielding form, so small, so slight, In his arms. "I went mad— for fear of losing you. I love you 1 Let me try to make you understand how much I love you, and perhaps you can forgive me. I want to marry you and take yon away with me. Only consent 1 We will leave all this for ever 1" It was some comfort to him afterward, that she lay In his arms all this time, quite conscious. If she would only speak 1 If she would only loof; up Into hit) eyesl "Of course you cannot trust me," he went on, still whispering in her ear; "but I would give my life for you. I would give my life to take back the pain I have given you." (To be Continued Next Week). Presbyterian Church. These are days of great interest to men everywhere, not only because of the many and startling occurrences throughout the world; but once more wo are approaching that season of the year In which Jesus and his disciples entered into the dark shadow of the TOSS. Therefore we Invite you to join n the study of lessons of the Sunday School. The Christian Endeavor will follow ilosely the great subjects studied from week to week. The morning sermon theme will be 'The Judge Who Sits in Judgment.' Svening sermon subject, "A Dream." jet all get into the services without all.—J. L. Coleman, minister. See the New Chevrolet Cabriolet and the 157 inch New Truck KOHLHAAS BROS. Phone 200 Algona, Iowa. /vwvywww IRVINGTON NEWS. Miss Myrtle Fitch wns a Sunday evening caller at the O. L. Miller home. Armor Lemkee was elected director of the Irvington school at the recent election. Mrs. Frank Shipley of this vicinity underwent an operation at Iowa City last Saturday. Tho house occupied by Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Miller, is being painted and papered by Fred Dole. Mrs. Chns. Harvey and little daughter, Barbara, spent Monday with her sister, Mrs. O. L. Miller. Mr. and Mrs. Otto Ramus and family of LuVerne spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rilcy and family. Mr*. Albert Butterfteldl visited on Sunday with her daughter, Mrs. Tony Sorenson and family of this vicinity. Mrs. Sever Chrlstenscn of Algona visited Sunday afternoon with her sister, Mrs. Bccda Watson and family. Mrs. John Frankl of Algona spent one day of the post week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Blythe. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Sttider of Corwlth were callers Saturday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Miller and family. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Loss and small daughter, Jean, of Algona were visitors at the Fred Dole home Friday evening. Mr. and Mrs. Erby Benson of Buffalo Center spent Friday with Mr. Benson's sister, Mrs. Paul Hudson and family. Annabclle Bordwell of Livermore came Sunday to spend a few days with ler sister, Mrs. Douglas Riley and tamily. Mrs. Robert Dutton and daughter, Sorlnne of Algona visited Sunday afternoon with Mrs. Dutton's brother, Fred Dole and family. Mr. and Mrs. Seward Thornton and family of this vicinity spent Sunday with Mr. Thornton's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Thornton. Milton Armstrong, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Armstrong of Livermore spent Saturday night and Sunday with Mr. and Mrs, Douglas Rlley and family- CETRID OF DISEASE GERMS in nose mouth and throat Let Zonito cleanse uway tho accumulated secretiono, kill the germs, prevent disease. Highly germicidal. Soothing to membranes. USETHEOXJD At all Drunaists, or sent prepaid by WII.L'*MP» M*-r- c^. CLEVELAND, O, For Sale by LUSBY'S DHUG STOKE s Sure I'll Go" The modera way for making dates, accepting invitations, arranging social events -is to call LONG DISTANCE You can talk 40 airline miles for 35c*; 70 airline miles for 50C> V ; and 100 airline miles for 60c*. Long distance telephone rates are based on airline miles and are less per mile as the distance increases. •Jf Thll If th* day lUtion-to-iUtion rate from 4:3O A. M. to 7 P. M. (or a thrtt-mlnut* convtrution and appli*» when you »ik to talk with «nyon« available at thi ttl«phgn» eall«d. NORTHWESTERN BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY Mrs. Edward Hammer of this vicinity has been confined to her bed the past two weeks with a serious attack of rheumatism. At this writing she has not improved much. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller, Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Crawford and two llttlo sons, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Bartholomew and son, Max and Mrs. Mae Miller were Sunday afternoon callers. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Wolfe, who had been spending the past two weeks with Mrs. Wolfe's sister, Mrs. Paul Hudson and family, left one day last week for their ucw home near Titonka. Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Fry and family, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Skllllng and family and Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Skilling and daughter, Elizabeth, Mr. and Mrs. Willard Gregson were Sunday dinner guests at the O. L. Miller home. ^ With Buick Syncro- Mesh, everybody becomes an expert at silent gear- shifting. You can accelerate faster with Syncro- Mesh. And you can shift to second instantly on steep hills, retaining complete control of the car- AND UP-f. o. b. Flint, Mich. J Owing talbeirpotiularity, tbtpresent modtli a/1931 Billet Slrnisbt Eisbls will be contn. »ejtiroug/jcvt tbe coming summer jaj/jlk ALGONA MOTOR SALES South of Algona Hotel Phone 7 14. Algona, Iowa. • THE EIGHT AS BUICK BUILDS IT

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,200+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free