Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas on August 21, 1952 · Page 4
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August 21, 1952

Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas · Page 4

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Fayetteville, Arkansas
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Thursday, August 21, 1952
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IWHT TUMI, Awflutt I t , 1«S2 Arkanaas dimra f«Tt4ta*Ule »*Hr Otmocrdl Publlilwd dally exctpl Sunday kr FAYETTEVILLE DEMOCRAT PUBLISHING COMPANY Bob.rli rulbrlflht. Pftlldinl Founded Juni 11 11(0 entered ai the post nlflce »t Fayetteville, A r k . as Sfcond-Cla» Mall Matter. Eira E. Gtarhsri. Vice Pr««.-Gintral Managtl Ted R. Wyllt. Edll«i _ MEMBEn~OF~THirASSOC!ATED PRESS The A.v.oriiilci PICK Is exclusively entitled to the use for republic'.mtm «l all ncw» dlipatchM ricuiled to it or not otherwise credited In thia paprr a n d also the local ncv.'f publUhed herein. All l i g h t s of ivpubllrMlun o( ipeelal Ail- palchc.', herein are albo itferved. Wr SUBSCRIPTION UATCS Uc coun- HUH ', U* In \Va*hmBifin. Brninn. I) Hi!'. A i t . i.nd Atlair cnunly, Otl* On*- »itnth ,...-* '»£ T h r r r IT, nlhi · |j W Six mini hi "«· 2 O n r y e n · · . . Hi* h u l l 11 ( v u n t i n c l h r i thin ahovt: Of m n n i t i Il JJ T'irrc nonnthh 12.H Si* m o n l f u 14 M Onr year . , .. IS Ot All mil! payable In Br]v»nf* Mambtr Audit Burtiu of Circulation T h e m is n i l n r k i i e s F . nor slnidow of r i r ; u h , w h o r e HIH wnrl.iTH n f i n i f j t i i t y m a y hide ihemsflvop.--Job 34:22 The Swedes Arc Upset Aranrrlhifc ' n Keillors, B r i t i s h np«'K ;iv'pnr.v, a n t i m h r r nf S\vcdrs rcHCiil. t h e fart t h a i Amorinin hmlyjruni'tls. repnrlerl- Iv «rnipd, have seen t'it I n shove srinip of I h c rrsklenls nf Stvpilon nroiinil in llu'ir 7.p,-i] I n "]irolpcl" Miss Mr.i'BiirPi T r u m a n , d a i i x h i p r (if ( h o American prpsidp.nl, who i? t o u r i n g alironrl. If Hie Swedish newspapers which rpportP.d t h n iiK'Irlp.nls art rnrrpH, snnip (if us fan s y m p a t h i z e with t h e folks who live in Stockholm. One Swedish newspaper reported t h a i a hodyj.riuird proven'ed its reporter from enlerin;; t h e public courtyard of t h e Stockholm City Hall while Miss T r u m a n ···as liein.T shown t h r o u g h the b u i l d i n g . A n o t h e r incident w h i c h made t h e Swedish press reportedly occurred at a t h e a l e r where nn I t a l i a n comic opera was p u t nn for Miss Triimiin. Two bodyguards refused f o allow a n y o n e into all e n t r a n c e Jlirs Truman was to use, even I hough it WHS i n t e n d e d for the other members of the t h e a ' e r public. A cameraman from an American f i l m company tried tn photograph Miss Truman as she was nlepprnjf into *n Embassy car o f f e r leaving t.h* station by a rear entrance. A Washington bodyguard (tripped him by (he shoulder and pushed him away although two Swedlih policemen were standing by, so the story goes. What the Swedes are upset about, and what we in the Unilcd Stales would be upset about if the tables were .turned, if some dignitary from abroad were KorfiR about t h e United States accompanied by bodyguards who took over from the. American police, is that foreign policemen (American bodyguards) are operating in Sweden. Tage Persson, chairman -if the Swedish polk'cnlen'i itoihty, told reporters tho police in Stockholm knew n o t h - ing of any special arrangement whereby Miss Truman would be guarded by Americans. "The Swedish police are fully capable of doing that," he is quoted as saying. "If t h e Swedish king and prhnc minister can move freely around in this country w i t h o u t borivguards. one may safely assume t h a t Miss Truman can do the same." The W h i t e Hon«e yesterday said there "is n o t h i n g to" all t h e rumpus. But the. i n q u i r y at the t i m e I h e statement was mpde v.-as not complete, and there very well may have been cause for some of t h e orif ii-fsm. The A f t n n b l a d c t . an e v e n i n g paper was pre'.ty irate about t h e whole proceeding's, nnrl very probably p-ot in the most, telling, if nol Ihe last, word. "Things do not go t h a t way in t h i s c o u n t r y . " il said. "Miss Truman's life rs in no danger in Stockholm A f t e r a l l . she U n o t going to sing." . _._ _ , : W i t h o u t Hiiccri'y, manners are mere spisb bowing and scraping.--Kang-Hsi The saddest (him. 1 to realize on an in- vo'tmenl is t h a t you'd be b e t t e r off if you hndn't made it. It's considered good luck to pick u n a pin--unless you do it w i t h a shoe t h a t has a holp in It. THE WASHINGTON Merry-Go-Round Br DREW PEARSON (While Drpw p r a r - c m i^ nn H h i i c f v a r a l i u r i . HIP V/flfhinRlon M f - r i y - ( in-Round u. lirinii w r i t l r n by M'Vtr.'il Histjnf,'ui:-hrr| cur-M r n l i u n n - isl.-.. 'iNrlav'j; hcinK Sen. K:ln s K r f a u v P i 1 . Derno- cirii. nf Trimrs:.cc.) I V r M i n n v i l l r . TPIIM.-- D u n n i t HM- !a«l f p w \vfcV,-.. I h;i\'f lir-m ir.'.Hrit: f r u n the fvirdeM ; i M p ? i i £ M nf my lil. I joj.t ihn i-Hinp-iJgn. hul my f;iitli in I h f h.'i.Mf jjrrMijp.v, nf t h n A m r r l r r m ;inriplc ha;, been iurrraflf-fl i r r n i R n r l n u j l y by this J rlnn't w o n t i i n y n n p tn t;'-t t h f iMiff-sslon t h a i T rnjnvfrl In^ln^ I don't, h k r - In I n - c . ;,ny b f t t e r I h (n thr n r x ! ( r M f i w . It wa.-. r; ] , n - i n j i y hard in !(·)·-·(«· in t h j v ciij.f. w h e n v.'f h a H hrcn Hi it for M 11 M if; ,MKI my f r i r n d i had w n r k M so hard for W l i f n i h r O e m n e r a f i r rcwvrnlinn w a s nvrr. my u i f r N r i r i f y and I ramc In M c M m n v i l l r , T c n n . . t f . Rrt srimt* rest In the muMlry on 3 f n r m nf n R'»nr| f r l C I K l Of O U T ? , CoWflll O l ' I l W i i n I d i ' l n ' i v.;.nt to t a l k abnut the corn-rut inn when f i imfls i-a me to seft nr\ but !hp subject a l w a y s j-prmH to i-omp up, a m i t" bo f r n n k I t h i n k I brn!i';l:t i! r i p »? n f t r - n ;r, ;n:\ our- rise. I couldn't fj]r-pp ;it n i ^ h t , ,-iI'hnuph J t r i f l In r e l a x my m i n d find ur-t ^'nif| a n d I M * ' ] s w i r m n i n R , f i s h i n g , and I wnul'i k f r p R n i i i n nvi-r the evprits nf thr r o n v r n t m n in nr- i i i i n d , I r v i n g to sfp where I rould have chani;rr| H U M E S by t a k i n g a r l i f f r - r r n t pnursp. K h n u l d I h;ivr hplrl nut find t r i e d tn dend- lock the roiivc-nlinn'.' Hid I do r i g h t in coina in ihf ("onvrnimn II;,!! to w i t h d r a w ? ShnuM I liavr n d v i ^ e i l mv f r i ' M i d s in vote riiffprcnlly on som^ nf HIP I V U M " "Klnn w k o n y m c abnul i t . Kslrs." Nnncy to Id mr at I^'.t. "Ynu H i d y o u r bpst and thp penplr r r . i l i r r i t . Thry h r l i r v r in \ n u rpgardlp.?B of thn outrnmP." * * * M v f n r i i d 1 ' wri r \ try i i n d r r s l a n H i n g Thry U'fnir mr thnij-i^nn 1 ' of r'iirour.ip,mg I c t l r r s from f v r r y s r r t i n n nf !ho i i ; j t i : i n . Those who lived n r a r Pimuch r a m p fo vrr mr. V/hrn I v;rnt In M r m n h i s to n i n k c a r n d m ;tnd t r l r v i ? i o n t a l k , I f l P V ^sve Up such a w p l r n n i n and wr»rc f.n t h o u n h t f u l nf Ma Hit-it I h r p a n to f p r l for thf first t i m r t h a t I h i n p s wrrrn't .^n had a f t r r all. * ir * I brcan In t.Qf somr of thp pnnd t h i n a s t h a t i-anir? out of our r a m p a i R n , oven Humph we- worn beaten. nii*ndniis exprripncp. I s h m j l d i'pri;iin]y If ;i l i r t l f f r prjuipprd s e i i t i t n r a; a rr-Milt. Now I kim'.v f i i s l hriiid of I IIP ittliliirlc;-; and j m i b i l i n n - ; nf our p r n n l p in ('very srrlinn of t h r i i a t j n n Rivp] 1 dn- v r l o p m r n t in thr Far Wf:.t. IOK of indii:,try in N'PW E l i c i t n r i , p p r c i f i l f a r m prnhlprr. 1 : or* m a n " rrcinns, l^icnlry. relic inn* a n d r acini m l n l p i anc^ arc to me no Inncrr problpm:; In v i u - i v m p i r l v frnm t'nnci'CF?innal hpaiinj;:^ I h a v c SCPM t h e m firs! h a n d . Too n f t p n in W a s h i n g t o n \vr t c n r l !o bfi-onip cynical and rtlsilliisinned. When n n r h^s ;m nn- p o r l u n i l y of v i M t i n c as T havo. Ihr nronlr m pvpry srclion of thr; n a t i o n , l h a t c y n i r i s m is washed away. This c a m p a i g n has f p a ^ ^ u i p d nir nf thr s p i r i t u a l and economic sturdiness of n u r great people. * · * - · - * · Frnnl a personal s t a n d p o i n t , t h r c a n i n a i r n was vpry r t w H r d i n p . Nancy and 1 IKIYP m-irlr gnorl f r i o n r i s in t-vrry srctinn of thr c n u n i r y . from Nrw Hainpsliin 1 to C a l i f m n i a and from WiM-nnsin to Florida. The l o y n l t y nf t b C f p friends would hr i n ^ n t r - iiiK I" any man. I t h i n k w h e n I was S I ' I H I R on t h p n l a t f n r m d u r i n g l h a t hi't b a l l o t nl t h p rnn- \Tti1inn. w a i t i n g to make b\' a n n o u n i T m e n t of w i t h d r a w a l . 1 HHW an e x h i b i t i o n of t l - r p r r s i M i a l jrrpatnef.s of men mid women w h i c h has made A m p i i c a the n a t i o n it is. Thesp delepRles kne\v m\' purnn5f in mniinit In i h r C n n v o n l i n n H a l l . As the mil r.ill wont nn. il war nbvlous I had no clvncr. P.\- .ill thp rulr*, nf p o l t t i r n l m n d i i c t . it \»'as to t h p i r intpic.'t tn Ket on thp w i n n i n g sirlp. Snmft Of IhfiH r n r r i P d thr ni;inil.i!n nf thr ncnp|p of t h i i r R t a t p . O t h r i s . in .--'.atns v h ' M P t h p y hsH no nri!r f ar'--. !;;^;! P-T-V-L:; ;i :-;:;-.j--nr! i i i - r l i \ r i r t u n ] l y . W i t h ^ try fpn- c v r r p t m n s t h e v j,t'ird up and counted t h e i r v n i r s fm ;i lo--i caurc. br- rausc they w f r r truh- I n v a l . As oaeb flelPRnlion cast I I ? \-ntp. ni^iiiirie.-; rrowclrrl nl on me of lone. h ' J f d t ;unnair.ii'-, n l'ip hot MJII nf f ' . T l i f o n i i a ond F'I'T'flii. thrrni-;h t h e cnld MIO\V nf N p w I l a m n s h i r e . \Vi-cniKin ;uid N e b r a s k a . I remembered t h e rour;u;e nf f r r r ncople f i R h t i n c .tpainst dirl;i!ori;il and s^!f--h i«o- l i t i r a l mneliines. and the rnthu r .i;i':m of i n s - i i m l younc f i t i / e n s who Ivid never t;iken ,m a c t i v e part in politic*; before. I remembered v i c t n r v celebrations w i l h New Knnlanderr., \ v i M i M i d d l e Westerners and Far Westerners; ,-ind 1 i p m e m - bpred one or two post-inorlems when we were beaten. I dn no! t h i n k 1he.-r qnnd pr-mle who sun- port pd TTIP loi wh;it t h e y were f i c h l i n p for. Thcv had a lot to do \\-iih I h p Pcmorratii' p a r t y nre- f r n t i n j t n soumi a n r l pniRiTsMve p l a l f o n n . Al5i. I have a deep r n n v i c l n . n t l i n t n i a n v b r n e f i c i a l r f f n r m s surh as a f e n n ; « l p r o M d o n t i j I p r i m a r y law w i l l emerge. I hey u'^nt n n r u m r n i i n r n ! in wdik stead- f f t M l y f o r pr,,cr u i i l i t i o n m . fur hiyh i n t e g r i t y in fjovrrmnent. for r l i i i i i n a t i r m of crlminnl in- flueinT.«. fnr clean polmcs w i t h young ppoplr and w n m r n brmji I t m u q h t more, actively into the councils of the p i i r t v . 1 am chul to be ;d!r to .;;iy to those fine people all n v r r S h e f n i i o . l Statp 5 who Mm id shoulder l i , shoultlei w i t h me 1 We haven't IftM-- "You're Kicking In to My Fund, Too, Ain'tcha, Chumr s.', \\T havr won a RIP;;! dral. We wcm because we p l a y f d thp ;;.-!!]ip h.ird anrl f a i r , \VP marie no drM'.. ;iiul WP r l i d n ' t ;:bandon t h e p r i n c i p l e s in w h i c h wr h d j r v p . U'e wnn, because no man and tn c ; u n ) - , i i p : i y m i i p i-;m say Jioncj-tly t h a t a cause is Ins! v.hcn it roMillrd in such an o u t p o u r i n ? nf i m b l i i - mtprr.^t in she basic t h i n g s of which our Amrnc.Mi drmnci ;M-.V iy b u i l t . I h a \ p v i s i t e d \: i t h Governor Stevenson since I h r m n \ r n t i n n . l i r appreciates t h e fact t h a t H c t n i n n l i j - h i n g thrj-r t h i i i K K is not only the dpi r c b u t Hit- i n a i i d a i c of thr rank nnd f i l p Dpmo- c i - i t . and n i v pnod f n c n d and neighbor John Sp.iikm.iti and 1 h a v e fought t o g e t h e r in the Scnalc Ini ;ho: c p r m c i p l e f . W h i l p Governor S t r v n i M ' i i was not e x a c t l y my f i r s t choice for l h c n r n i o r r M i c n o m i n a t i o n , I \vish him enorl I l u c k and t r u s t ho w i l l c a r r y the invigorated Dem- I ncratic p a r t y on tn a grrat victory. j Bennett Cerf Col. W i l l i a m Jackson, who tnvne.d Ihe land on which this tree stands, stipulated in his w i l l , "For and in consideration of the. great love 1 bear this tree and the desire 1 have for its pro- lection for all time. I cnnvcy lo it e n t i r e possessions of itself and all land w i t h i n eight feet thereof on all sides." The original tree succumbed to old nge and a heavy storm years ago, but in its place thrives one of its offspring. * * + "When warm weather first sets in," noted Philosopher Sam Ilimincll. "Irees put on clothes. When Ihe summer heat is most intense, their clothes ar« thickest. When the season becomes rooler, they begin to remove their clothes. And when the hitler cold of w i n t e r arrives, they l a k e off their clothes entirely." "Mniphh." commented his down-to-earth sales manager. "Just l i k e Ihe young jlrl who lives in the apartment next door to us. 1 ' A inv.-n m Siu!|] Dakota was in the pn)cess nf p l p c t i n ? » new mayoi a n d board of advisors, and Mr.-. Jiubb.ml l l n m c h t it would be cduca- t l r i n ^ l in t a k e her h u v c n - y e a r - o l d d a u g h t e r w i t h her lo Ihc p n l l i n s booth. On the way home t b f ri;jucht,ci a i k c f l , "Mom, do you a l w a y s vote t n r thr men you Invp moM?" "Whn.over put an idc,i Ii!;o t i i i i t in \ o u r mind?" wondered Mrs. l l u h h h t d . "Wei!." said t h e d a u g h t e r , "I saw you put ki.-:,e;- nc.Nt to i h r i r names." * * * J (.'.-ni^ht in a nwv !irie. »n A l p i n e climber ' .-.n-.- a Si. H r n i i r r ! I n i l i n f * toward h i m , a kcp of mill ; i r d u r i d r r i t s c h i n . "Hurrah." cried t h e i - h m b c r . -|?err mines man's best friend--and look a\ t n e nig dog i h a f s b r i n R i n f i it:'' * * * .lo-di l.op,an has r o m - n r t c t l H new d r i n k which be c,il's hi.- i n i n i a t m p h i g h b a l l , one s n i f t e r and in a m i n i t a ' u r p under the J a b l p . * * * No! fa f f r u ; i thr U n i v e r s i t y of Georgia c a m p u s siriiids t h e n n l y Irec in t h e world t h a t owns i l s r t f . K.ariv m Ihc pifiJitcen hundreds, one I JJl_y'll ^° * l ^ VCI T Time .--.-.-»- By J i m m y Hatlo REALLY COULD USE IT, WITH KIDS AMD ALL Questions And Answers C5--Tn how many colors are opals found? A--Black, brown or while. \Vlien cut and polished they reflect many colors. Q--Why is Swedish Finland's second language? A--Sweden ruled Finland many years and many people retain the language. Q--What is the b i i t h d a t e of real opera? A--In ifinn when Euridicc, composed by Peri and Giulio Caccini, was produced. Q--Hew much nicotine is found in tobacco'.' A--From 2 to 7 per cent. Q--In what war did Florence Nightingale become famous? A -- T h p Crimean War nf 1854. Q--How f a r must bees travel to make a pound of honey? A--To make on* pound of honey, bees may have to travel a total distance of about 50,000 miles. Q--Which state first abandoned capital pun- i s h m e n t ? A--Michigan. Q--What is the heipM requirement for a British Grenadier Guard? WYSONG chatted a few | l minutes, then slmxi up. picked I up his hat and topcoat from the I divan. I l o turned to Emmy. "It was fine mealing you, H... Ciirr." He iiook hands with Mark I and F 1 e I c h c r, then turned to j Laurie. The line of his jaw tightened and he spoke awkwardly. "Glad 1 had a chance lo see you, Laurie, if only for a few minutes. Louis snid lo tell you hello." I "You're not leaving town al', ready?" I Steve nodded. "Got to get bick I to the classroom." Me mnnaRed a arin. "That's w h e r e I belo teaching history to a hunch of kids." "Kut, Steve, why don't you stay and al least try to see another publisher about your book?" Panic swept through her. lie couldn't go away. They hud so many things lo talk about. She'd missed him so and here he was now. Steve, don't go. She didn't t h i n k she ! could bear to let him go away ' again. Mark was showing him to thf door and then f h c r c w.is the sound of the door closing and Mark came back. There was a lone silence in the ( room. No one looked al anyone I else, and Mark busied himself mix- I ing more drinks. Finally Emmy said, "Sn that was the reason you came tuck from I n d i a n a looking l i k e the world hart fallen apart." Her unbelieving ImiRhtcr rippled, "Oh, l.aurle, how could you let yourself get involved with someone like lhat." No one said a n y t h i n g for a few momenls, and then Fletcher mut- l l t e r c d , "I've got to be running I along, Laurie, 1f you'll excuse me." 1 He leaned and kissed her che*k j ' and palled her shoulder. "1 thought I j he seemed a very nice sort of a hap. darling," he whispered. A f l e r Klctchrr was gone, Mark inncd to l.mmc and .inld, "Your mother did a very thorough ]ob Laurie, didn't the? But I thought it was going a little too lar to introduce Fletcher ai your flanet, Why didn't you speak up?" "Mr. Wysong knew, even before I said that." Emmy put in. "that it just wouldn't do. It wasn't really the book that brought him to New York. I knew that the moment he s t a r t e d talking. He'd come to see Laurie. He'd eome to smooth over whatever trouble there'ri been between them and I wanted lo make lure he under slood that I wasn't going to stand idly by and make the same mistake I mad« when I married Louis!" M a r k had turned hii back to them and was looking out of the window, but suddenly he wheeled around, to face them. There was an odd look on his face. "I think, Emmy," he said slowly and firmly, "that it's time we were t r u t h f u l , for Laurie's sake, and for the sake of her happiness." His mouth was drawn and here was a look of pain In his eyes. Why Mark," E m m y cried, 'whatever do you mean?" T MEAN just this. Emmy. Ever since Laurie has been old enough lo be interested in men, you've been choosing them for her. rou picked out Fletcher for her n marry because it wai such a suitable match," Mark Can- ttld quietly. "Yon miurt admit that Laurie and Kletchfir dn make n lovely couple!" F.mmy countered. "You've impressed it on her over and over lhat he must never mak« the ttrrlhli mistake you made, hjr marrying someone Uki LouUI" ·And why unnuldnt *he proflt hy my mliUke?" Emmy had turned pale. "I don't know what you're rymg tn ftt at, Mark." "]jur»," Mark i a l « , T«ur mother's big mistake was not tn marrying your father. It was in giving him up. She had promised to love, honor and c h e r i * h--to cling to him, and live his life, but when it came right down to doing It, the was too much of a coward. She refused to meet him even half way." "You can see for y o u r s e l f , Laurie," her mother cried, "knowing Louie and knowing me, just how impossible it would have been. I couldn't have slood it there in Ridgeville. among all thote horrid provincial people. I had to leave him!" "But you havc regretted it ever since!" Mark put in softly. "You've Wished a thousand times that you lad stayed with Louis in spite of everything. You've never really been happy with me." "Oh, Mark, yes, thcrc'vc been :lm«. What are you saying?" But Emmy knew what her hus- and was saying. Her eyes admit- ed it and now she walked toward lim, her glance fell. Even before Wark spoke. Emmy's question had been answered. LTARK'S voice was calm but in- sistcnt "You don't have to iretend any longer, my dear. I've mown it for years and years. Let's ace it. You were young and young wople do impulsive things. But et's not let Laurie ruin her life. f she loves Steve, then his world s the place for her. Besides, she s Louis's child more than she IB ·ours. She's like Louis in many ways, Emmy, and there's no u?e n your trying any longer to make her over Into your own image." 'Mark, you're being sentimental nd old-fnhlnnrd." There wis. owever, a suggettlon of a tremor n Emmy's voice. She stared al flark, who returned hw gaze for long silent moment. Finally, !mmy turned to her daughter, "here wore tears In her eyes now I guess he'i right. Laurie. 1 think you'd better to *nd tnd Steve, if you're really In love with him.* Laurie ahook her head. "What y*u Hath item to tvnlook." the uld, "l tht fact that Steve do*«nt Matter Of Fact BY JOSEPH AND STEWART ALSOr Wathington certain by now It is p r a c t i c a l l y hat n n n r of t h e real issues confrnntinp. this cnun- iiy wi!l be realistically (IwiissH in the presidential campaign.-.. After f o u r years mvay from Washington, G o \ e r n n r Ste. fn.son By the end of this year t h j NATO Jorce may balance the R u ~ . tiian force in tfuroue or in rescr-e for Kurnpp. But In the salrllltr:., with t h e i r KeeminRly prostrate economies, the Soviets h a v e now brought a m i n i m u m of (ill Polish. probably doesn't know t h e si/r of ' C/.ccn, H u n g a r i a n and B u l g a r i a n the skeleton in the policy-makers' i ciiu.Mons u; lo a h i f h standard of cupboard. General JJisrnhim-c'r, I combat readiness. who does kno\v. wcn't t e l l ; "r it . . lesst the senera] has thown no K n i a i K ' . there is the a l l hul un- JiRn of telling lo dale. , loudiabic subject of atomic po- Take. for instance, t h e d i s p u t e ! t e n t l a l . There is no argument a n v that has recently r i v e n the hish- i longer, that bv loss the Soviet's er echelons of the Stair D r n a r t - I w m n a v c 8 potentially decisive mem. the Defense D e p a r t m e n t and j s ( 0 ck of atomic weapons. Ivlesn- Ihe N a t i o n a l Security Council with | w hi] e , however, a very serious id' debate and discord. A review America's strategic s i t u a t i o n , present and projected, was quiet- 'y initiated some t i m e ago. In part, Ihe purpose of ihis review was to jet a f i r m f o u n d a t i o n for the 1934 foreign ,-inc! defense budgets, w h i c h must be presented to Con- just after the new ^car. In °'' gumont has also begun about the f u l u r e value of atomic weapon, lo Ihe Soviets and to us. One school strongly contend:! l h a l Ihe Smiet power to deliver atomic weapons lo American tar- gels is constantly increasing, and that our air defense is not keep: K ir w.;d.s-\. h.t; ii n « ?.TM-« h j.?i 5,T' n / .11TM'- i concise, over-all picture ready or President Truman's successor. No sooner was this strategic review launched, however, t h a n a ; ery great and f u n d a m e n t a l ques- . The same school points to the Sov ief air defense in depth, which is i m p r o v i n g w i t h each passing momh. And t h i r tchool warns t h a i this Soviet air defense e?n be Inn stroiiR for t f i c vvesl'.s strategic air forces, by ig.'ij nr earlier. In f h n r l . if the pessimists are lit I (T* Bt Cotl*w4 lion brutally presented ilself. The question was -- indeed the question still is -- whether to shape American policies by estimates nf I r l « n ( - l h c Soviets will not only be Soviet capabilities, "or by estm- stronger t h a n Ihe west in conven- ates of Soviet inlentions. t l o n a l wrapnns. They may ah.o The" question eannot be a v o i d 1 n " vc t h r P°«"?r lo launch a crin- ed for a reason as simple, as il is ' P l i n K a l °rnic a t t a c k against this bleak. A prreat many authorities. c ""ntry. and they may be reason- including some of the wisest men : ah] ' wcl1 defended against roun- In the government, do not t h i n k ! 'er-altack. Tli". optimkts contend the w»stern defense e f f o r t , as n o w ! l h a l l h o nnllrok is not nearly so planned, can possibly reach its a n - 1 ba *- Bul l!le - v 'S''?P. nonetheless, hounced foals. Desnite the hopeful i " lat if s i m p l e Soviet military cap- .public talks, the balance nf pow- ! abilities are Ihe tesl. a subslan- er in the world is not s h i f t i n g in ', lia "- v increased western defensi our f a i o r . We are growing strons- i c f f o r l is "rsenlly needed, er, but the Soviet empire is grow-! The problem of .Soviet I n l e n - ing stronger still. ! linns has been raised at just this ! point in the debate. Aiain, there The arguments for (his nci,si-' l l a l e hecn '"'" f'-'l't 1 " 15 . One sche.nl mistic: estimate are part .secret and i has al 'S ue d t h a t Soviet i n l e n t i o n s iart obvious. In the decade l!)4,i-i v -'" 1)e ""'"'.v conlrplloft by fio- .9.V), fnr instance, any s t u d e n t of | vict capabilities. I n other words, j Ihe subject can perceive lhal the ; lhe - v l l a x e ! ' airl l h c K r e m l i n w i l l total Soviet military investment ] lr - v l o do UR '" i f 8nH whl?n t h p w i l l be far geatcr. in reai terms. ! o p p o r t u n e l y arkes. than \Vestern in\'estrnpnt. We are ^ The oilier school has asserted investing more now, proportional: that Ihi:. is a wronc rule. Thpy ly. Vet over-all, in the to years i have claimed Ihst t h e Fm lets do since the. war, many hundreds o f ' not w a n t a major war; t h a t they m i l l i o n s more man hnurs w i l l be j are harassed hy tno m a n y con- devoted. ri'reetly and indirectly, to l the Soviet ,war e f f o r t than to ] western defense. By the same t o k - ! they w i l l continue, as at present, en many tens of millions more( merely pvabbin^ for w h a t e \ e r is tons of raw materials \ \ i l l h a v r - : nol n a i l e d down. A great weight been invested in Soviel war p i e p - ' o f experience in dealing v.ith the arations than in western prrp.ired- Soviet Union iias supported this · ness--a reasonable guess is t h a t theory, which makes the purely the ratio of steel investment w i l l m i l i t a r y balance so much loss di. c finally work out at t w o and a huJf , quieting. Yet opponents of the to one in favor of the Kremlin, (theory have countered thai if Lord i These figures, arid not t h e c!ol- Bryce and Alexisde Tocqucville 'ar or ruble costs, nre the r i g h t , had been a l i v e today, even Ihf.^e tradirlions w i t h i n t h e i r own system to ri"'rf a major war: and t h n t measures of Soviet and western great students could not h a v e effort in the post-war decade. To forecast the course of A m e r i c a n judpe the dimensions of the m i l - ! post-war policy. How then, t h r v itflry machine v.hich if the So-! have asked, can we be so sum i-1 end product. about what Soviet policy will be? look M the b n l a n - ; nf ·'orec* !u The dispulo w i t h i n the pnvern- Europe. In eomparothx y p r o : , - j ment may be circular, but it is pcrous Western E'.mip 0 . w i t h im- j still a l i f e and death dispute. Yet portant American aid. (U-n. M f l t - j o n e does nol hear General Kisen- thew E. Ridfrway v i i l har.dly he ] bower a r g u i n o for So\'iet inten- able to muster 25 ready divisions tions. and ryovrrnor Slcvcnson and 20 rather dubious nserve di- . jile^dinc for Soviet capabilities, as visions. ' our policy guin'e. Dorothy Dix Dear Dorothy Dix: My uta-on- trollablc habit of m a k i n g sucHslic remnrkf h?s resulted in the can- (.·elliition of my eiiiHCcmc.'it. Although my f i a n c e o f t e n bpgacd HIP to stop being Kflrraslii', | cannot overcome trie ininulsc to sfi.v tilings a? they pop i n t n my head. Also, he didn't l i k e many t h i n p s I wear, such as low necks, shorts. etc. My mother was very upset over our breaking the enriaqemont, and says we are not to see carh other again. I feel l h a t things could be pntrhcd up, .since we do love each other. B. 1U. , Ans.ver: Much of the d i f f i c u l t y | can be F.\i'u.sed on the ground of ; ymir y o u t h ; ?t 18 one i.-n'l expected to be o n i p l e t c l y stable. How. ever, il ynu feel old enough to be ; niiiiricci. o;i c h u u l t l be old enough Ui control bad habits. N a t u r a l l y M'ur m o t h e r Ir. upset nt pre£ent, \ but sl'.e'il probably realize t h a t | much of the trouble \vas,vour own '_ f a u l t , and she'll relent. M a k e u p | your own m i n d t h M you must no ; more t h a n m a k e a simple effort to overcome your f i u i l f ? . Firm resolution is more in order. in TIMFS -- It p»T*- Sartorially Speaking Answer to Prevfout Fuiile 8 By way of 9 Redacted attire ' HORIZONTAL 55 Hindu queen 1 Sartorial item 5 , 6 , ?ctten 5 Strtorlal headgear 5S Malt dTM 1 TM 5 8 Sartorial VERTICAL garment ] p rom ontories 11 Italian river 2 Speaker 13 Chemical 3 Handled suffix 4 SinaU cnlid J Notion 5 Hebrew 15 Time gone by pr8phet H Steamer (ab.) 6E . 1C rinciEl 17 Assists block 18 Grwk letter 7 succinct ·19 Pester 21Muke lace ·' 22 Drunkard , 23 More uncommon I 24 Summer (Fr.) I 25 City in Nevada '27 Military tsusUnt 29Divini bird 31 Onager 32 Devotee 33 Select (ref.) 34 Irritate 36 Measure of paper 39 Legal point 43 Wash lightly 44 Snooze 48 Measure of cloth 4? Ceases 48 War jod 49 European mining district (1 Before K Arabian prince A M T A O R F y H. U « m A V U 1^ o A '·:l T 8 S O E A U p t_ c A U ft E £ S T O 77 fc R R K O ** C N ^ C a i_ 3. 1_ A R , ' · U T k O S H O P c u 1 P A fr'l A T 1 C C A M O K T A R D N A Kl «. A S I ·t a o L e 3 · f» a ;·' T i_ o s r* A N o · 9 u s Q A N C A V L. E · W · * i C f * U T 1C A 1 A N t» C E A N !0 Rubbings out 39 Place anew 28Brad 4[Entries in 18 Small island ledgers SO Knight (ab ) 42 Persian 31 Symbol lor waterwhecl actinium 34 Tell 43 Enchantment 45 Capitol of ji, France 10 Dispassionate 35 Body of land 11 Small sip 37 Beast 50 Short-napped 19 Sartorial 38 Pertaining to fabric the sea 52 Age device MUnll of wire mtuuremtaU 1 IZ IS it h si * ^ U ft z it to 3 Is U '.,·'/*; · '.V tt Ib n it W s//. 'WS. '%''· 10 ^ h w 17 ' ij U $ to ?.''. HI ii M 51 ' '/'/* '·'/', ' ' * , ; ; .. fl / ^ M U iY f Ij 'i!. fo 7 it 8 f 1 K ?C '·'·/.: $1. ^ » a It »v 1* 4 0 » IS 11

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