Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas on June 9, 1952 · Page 4
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June 9, 1952

Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas · Page 4

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Monday, June 9, 1952
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4__NOrmWKT ARKANSAS riMIS, f*r^»vim, ArUmm. Monday, Jum t, 1»SJ OTTTi.r leTaMevllU DlflT Dtmocnll Publlihtd dillf exctpl Sunday by FAYETTEVILLE DEMOCRAT PUBLISHING COMPANY BobtrU rulbrl(|ht. Pr«lidtnl Founded Jum 14. 1UC Entered »l the P"Sl office at Fayettrvllle, Ark., as Second-l'lasi. Mml M a t t e r . ___ ·am E. Gtarharl, Vlc« Piai.-G«n«ral Manlgtl Ted H. Wylit. Editor nSEMBElToF THE ASSOCIATED PHESS The Associated 1'rcn n cx.-i^ivri;; entitled to the uie for l e p u l i l u - a t i n n of ,ul nrws tiispatchM credited lo it or not o t h f i w i r r rrriir.fld In I h n piper ami ai;o thr lm-.il ncvs pm.lished heiem. All rights of republican'"! "' special dis- patrhc« herein arc aim ic^cm-d. __ ^^ ; HATr.S f t . *«rf . ^^ r j r r l r r i MtU ' e t t » In Vtn'hinjcrm Mrr.!nn. m Ark . rnr) ArUlr rniinlj'. om« Tlircr rrrnlhl .. Six nvn1h» M»!l :-. rrunlim nthrr I h u n Mvv» On- ir.nnlli T^rrr m^nthk Si* monthi -- Onr *rir All mill pjivnlil* In nrlvi Maoii'.n coim- : ' M«mb«r Audit Burnau of Circulation HP t h a t I'pprovoth a s n i r n o r j i P l t P l l i I n hirrmelf shartiP: and hp Hint r f h t i k c t h a wicried m n n K P t i p l h h i m s r l f f t blot.-Proverbs 0:7 The Need To Be Alert E n f p r p r i s f n j f croups i n l e r c s l o i l in keppinj; A m p r i r n filer' to d a n t ' p r m i t f h l do t h e c o u n t r y it s e r v i r p by p r p p n r i n i r a sort. of five-foot shelf of bonk? niitl o t h p r mat c r i a l u which pxpo.ip how C o m m u n i s t s rosily opprate. T'nPfp hits IIPPII «n p x t v a o r d i n a r y prowl h in I he last y p n r or so in t h p d o c u m e n t a r y ovidcncps o f ( ' n n i t n i i n i . i t activity. Fort mint ply a h i j r h proportion of it appear* wholly rplinblp. Some primfl examples arp W h i l l n k p r ChamhrrR' n u t o h i o ^ r a p l i y , " W i t n p s s . HPI-- bprt P h i l b r i r k ' n slory of his dotdilo l i f e /is i Communist party mr-mhcr and FH1 a c p t t l , and the current scrips in t h e S a l n r r l a y Evening Pos! on thp cspiniiMKP n e l f v i l i e s ·'· of K l a u s Fiti'lia, n o r n u m - b o r n R r i l i s h atoniir s c i e n t i s t w h o pave t h p R u s s i a n s * the atom homb. i No o a l a l n f r of f i r s t - r a l e m a t e r i a l s in - t h i s field would IIP q u i t e c o m p l e t e w i t h o u t J a copy of t h e new A m e r i c a n f i l m , " W a l k .1 East on Bearon," w h i c h p r e s p t t t s in an im- .'·' adorned p t r . i i c h l f o r w a r d m a n n e r not only ^ Commtinisl m p t h o d s b n l Ffi! t p f l i n i q u p * in 'i trarkinjr down Red spies in an a c t u a l rasp. If t h i n k i n p : A m e r i c a n s rould t a k e advantage of all these m a t e r i a l s . I hoy would h* in a far b e t t e r position lo j u i l u e ' l n e im- t u r e and extent of t h e r o m m i i n i f l t t h r e a t w i t h i n our bonier?. They would hp r ' p a r on one important f u n d a m e n t a l which now -. i» clouded in confusion. That is t l m t the epy and thp pnllcy-iiiflupneer are seldom-if ever--the same. All t h e t l i i n j r n w h i c h a man has to do to influence, policy, openly .. a d v o c a t i n g pro-Soviet views, g a h n t a g i n i r " A m e r i c a n a l t i l i i d e s , are calcnlaled t n arouse suspicion of h i m . The gi»ul spy is in the business of not n r n u p i n t r suspicion. K l a u s Filch.", is a perfect p x a m p l p . lie w a s a C o m m u n i s t , w i t h i l e f i n i l e convictions. At first he kept t h e fuel q u i e t in his adopted B r i t a i n because he saw it an H h a n d i c a p to his developing carper as a s c i e n t i s t . But once he bpjran spying fnr Russia, hp had a b e l t e r reason. Fuchs became a l m o s t a model for a scientist w o r k i n g on a se rel w a r t i m e project. He not only did o n l h i n i r to s t i r suspicfon. HP ftlisriiprl h i m s e l f -- n o t too os- t e n t a t i o u s l y -- w i t h thosp w h o were "touch about s e c u r i t y . " HP u s u a l l y spoke attains! releasing classified i n f o r m a t i o n t o t h e ;:uhlic. This pnsp helppil m a k p hhn a perfect. "sleeper 1 --a spy whose h a b i t s are so c i r - cumspect t h a t h e v i r t u a l l y never d r a w s n l - t e n f i o n . A spy net. f u n c t i o n s hesi w i t h a , host of sleepers. A Igor Hi.-s was one. T h a t ' s w h y c h a r a c t e r t e s t i m o n i a l s i n t h e Hiss t r i a l a n d s i m i l a r proceedings are really beside the point. Of course t h e spy , can produce men In a l l e s t to his c h a r a c t e r . He would not he H spy if hp could n o t . If he w p n t a r o u n d a r n u s j i i K everybody's suspicion, spmiti'ijr Soviet propa'canda' and t h e l i k p . h i ^ nspfuhipss to a p o t e n t i a l PHP- my would hp zero. Thp p n l i c v - i n f l u p i i c e r h a s h i i role. too. b u t it is a ( l i s l h i c t one. The ( w o roles ,,re not i n t e r c h a i v e e a h l i . . H n i i - e | ' o s » : i t The people's s a f e l y is in Ihe law of f - " i ] . -James n t i s THE WASHINGTON Merry-Go-Round »T DREW PEARSON W a s h i n g t o n T h e K i n g Commitlcp. w h i c h ha'-' d-inc ;i r r n i a i k a h l y good job of probing tax f r a u d s . i« jitiniit to wind up Its career nn June .10 H e f n r c r l n i n t m. however. It has explored--very gingct ! y - - - t h e I P X l e t i i r n p a n d h u s l n e f * opera t i o n s nf one of i t « own member*. This Is almost unheard of in Conflicts Mem- lie^ of the House and Senate for Ihe nrat p a r t f o l l o w an u n w r i t t e n r u l e t h a t they do not pry i n t o r h r h o t h e r s business. Nevertheless, t h e K i n g C o m m i t t e e has done some q u i e t prnbina of its own member*--nonr oilier l h a n Congressman Eugene K r o u g h , Democrat, who is elected from p l e h i a n Brooklyn hut lives on swank Park A v - enue. II happens t h a t this c o l u m n i s t has kept a w e a t h e r eye on Congressman Kpough d u r i n g t h e past two years and his record is i n t e r e s t i n g . Kenuih was elected to Congress in 193«. but for I I y e a r s h " took n o a p p r e c i a b l e interest t n Spurn. Hi«. career In Congress featured a plan to send the Congressional Record lo federal j i i d R e s and lo gran! free postage to t h e armed forces. Not one speech did hr m a k e on Spain. Thru siiddpnly. a f l e r I I s i l e n t years i n C'on- RIPSS. Keniigh sudden! 1 , 1 became I h r champion of D i c l a l o r Fiance. HP l i t t e r e d the Congressional H p r o i r l w i t h s t a t e m e n t * a n d e d i t o r i a l s f a v o r a b l e tn Spain. He I n t e r r u p t P r l congressional dehalcs to defend Spain. He o f f e r e d an a m e n d m e n t to include Spain in M a r s h a l l plan h a n d o u t s * * IV Thi« bcgHIl in Ifllfl. It was in I " t 9 »!.,o l h a t CoiiKiPsimiin Kcniiyh was scpn f r p q i i ' - u t l y in i b e cornpHny of Franpo's lobbyist, a m i a b l e . l i k a b l e Charles r.tlnrk C l a r k , who now riiaw* Sinn.000 a n n u a l l y from t b e S p H n i c l i EmbflHsy though in 1D4!) he drew n n l v ViO.riflO. (In Ortobcr R. 1949. Congressman Keoucfh p a i d a v i s i t lo Dictator Franco in M a d r i d in comp a n y w i t h Mii'tthcr Kr.-incn e n t h u s i a s t . Sen Owen n r e w v t r t of M a i n e . Lobbyist C h a r l e s P a t r i c k C l a r k \ ^ a s I n M a d r i d w i t b thprn. · T r a v e l i n g on a Spanish I r a i n i b a l n i j b l . Con- K i p s v j n a n Kpough w.'is reported in have bar' *.?,,000 stolen. I n j e t h e r w i t h his p a n t s , when he' h u n g Ihp p a n t s too near a w i n d o w in a j-lppping r.ir. Pi ior to 194)1. also. Consrrssnian Kpouch on- posed thr n a t u r a l eas Inhhy and voted a g a i n s t (be Di/.lpy h i l l w h i c h would h a v e h i k e d »as rates. The h i l l would h a v e meant h i g h e r ens h i l l s lo the Brooklyn housewives who elected h i m , and he vnlcd for the bouspwives. R u t In Ill-Id. Kpoiich and Charley C l a r k . lr,h- b\ i*l for a gas p i p p l i n e company, as well as for .".pain, had become f r i e n d l y and Keougb reversed l u m s e l f . HP not only followed tbe eas lobby's l i n e d u r i n e h p a i i n f i s iji cominittre. bill a c t u a l l i i n t r o r i n c p f i two a n i r n d m p n t s wblch \voold bave marip Ihp KPM h i l l just as strong as Ihp Mi/.lcy h i l l which hp hnri previously voted a g a i n s t . A f t e r f a l l i n g l o s t r e n g t h e n Ihe b i l l , a n d prob- a b l y to iirotrcl h i n w i f w i t h Brooklyn house- w i v e s , Kcouch f i n a l l y voted "no" on f i n a l p«ss- * * * At ahnul t h i s lime. Coii(n.-»sman Keoueh began lo receive n series of checks from lobbyist Charley Clark. They were lisled as payment* hv Clark for legnl advice on a lax case which Ihe'f.-deral government bad a g a i n s t Silas F.. Chambers of M i a m i . Tbe first check was dated March fl. 19.111. for SI.BOO; another on March 21. insn was for sl.fiOO; April \ $r,nn; May 3, $5(]f1; a n d ' . l u n e 15 fl.nnn. In September. 1(150. sr ,mc monllis a f t e r t b e cliccks had passed, f handed thp I n f o r m a l i n n lo t h e . l u s l i c e D e p a r t m e n t , whereupon holb Keoush and Clark were nulled by Ihe FBI. Immediately t h e conitressmnn wrote ,1 l c i t p r in Clark dated October .11, 11150, w h i c h appeared to hp aimed at a l i b i l n c . his t r a n s a c t i o n . It s t a l e d : "I have Riven f u r t h e r p o n s i r i p i a t i o n to thp propriety of mv c o n t i n u i n g lo art as advisory counsel. Therefore. If it ,,IPPI S w i t h your approval. I should ask you to consider t h a t om f i l m bat w i l h d r a w n a n d i-onsldpr l h a l t h r fcp w h i c h vou previously paid us w i l l be in f u l l . " \Vhcn tbc cnncrcssman aod l/ihln-isl C'lark W I M P interviewed hv t h i s column recarding the purpn'v- of tlH-sr. fpp t . they told d i f f e r e n t storips A c p o r d i n c to Krouuh. C l a r k had merely d r a l t w i t h h i s Kcw York l a w f i r m . H a l p i n Keou c h a n r l SI .lohn. not w i l b him. Bui when Clark was a^lml bow K p o u c h bar! earned HIPSP fees hp ,, x . p l a i n e d t h a t Ketmgh harl given \-rrv h e l p f u l advice. "Then II w.i. K P . I I I C I , ,, ho advised you nn mis case 1 '" C l a r k was asked " Y e s " A shorl l i m e later. Ihp K i n K T.lx Fraud Comn u t t e e . of u-hieh Kcouch is a member r i g h l l v r e p i n u a n d P d F.x-Co,, c ,.p s ., mnn Vincent Quinn or N e w ' i m k for t a k i m ; (^ rs ; n connection w i t h l a x caves w h i l e be was a member of Congress * -* * ' How did Keouuh h a p p e n to !,,SP his ,,;,,,, s m Spion"" 1 asked C l a r k . "Hr b u n s Vm I,.,, n e a r t h e w i n d o w " C ' l a r k explainer!. "Someoui. pulled them out at l o a d s t a t i o n . H u t hp only had $2 000 popkct-noi S5.nn.ti as reported in t h e press They'd collecterl some moncv to pay for the imp o r t a t i o n of aiilns. anil Kcouch wa lo tbc port lo a i i a n c p for i t . t 0'iRifssman Kpousb in t u r n was asked w!v he bappcnpd lo support IPI;,..!,,,,,,, whl ,. h ^.i,,,^. 1st ( i;n k \\-as i n l p i o l c d m. "1 don't t h i n k I s h n u ' d ,-,,, m iicnt." ),,- i c p l i e d " W h v have you m a d e so m - m v speeches f . i v i i i i n K Spain'" Keoimli was ake--; ' I don'l t h i n k I ' v e liail much l o S av a l m u t Spain." he countered. Reminded t h a t t h e ('011- rail- in his OIMC down Thcv'll Do It E\cr\ Time ---- *· By jimm LOOK /AT OM /fWS-W4TE*?INl6 THE UWH.HQ LE5S J IT WAS A JOB 10/tUKE. HIM WE ,4 8ATM MoiV DID HE EelOUGH COUGM TO GET THAT LOOKS LIKE A DWE OVER OVlL WA* FW6OM, IF YOU TD OET LOOK AT A FKL'S NEW WITHOUT 6ECM-- TVAW« AHO A WATU3 MAT TIC TO J.P.T, MAOfOH "Something on Your Mind, Mister?" gicssional fiecord was f u l l of his speeches, he ! derlinrd 'o c o m m e n t . Asked about t h e rpvcrsal rif bis p o s i t i o n re- g a r d i n g n a t t i r n l z a s a f t p r Clark got i n t o t h p pic- t u r e , thr congressman said hp prpfprred not lo ! go I n t o thp a r e u m r n t s nf Ihp cas I p R i s l a i i o n but j IIP d i d n ' t see a n v t h l n r , inconsislcnt ;n his pn-;i- I lion. ' 1 i Queslionrd .ibout t h e fpps Y from C ' l a r k ' s l a u ' f i r m in i-nnn Silas C i h a m b p r s l a x m a t t e r , K r o t i R b at fiir.( replied l h a t a l a w y n ' s r p l a t i o n s w i t h bis r ' l i c n t arc strictly p r i v a t e . Later h p r l n i n i f d - m u n i c r t o w h a t C l a r k s a i d -- l h a t C l a r k ' s r e l a t i o n s wcrp w i t h h i s l a w f i r m , n o t w i t h h i m . That is part of thr rpcor.-l nf a l u p t n h n r of t h e K i n g C o m m i l l c p now probing t n x f r a u d s . It w i l l hp i n t e r e s t i n g to spp if thp K i b R pmhers ptorpcd w i t h t h e i r i n v c s t i R a i i o n of t h e i r own member. Thirty \nrs Afro Today ( F n v o t i p v j l l f . P n i h H c n r i r - n f . . l u n n 9. l f ) 2 2 ) Thp Frist-n K;iho,vl luis iniul^rrrl rniinri Slimmer Iran 1st f.ms frnm Van Rumi anrl Smith tn K a v c t t p v i l l c . RP.CCTI: and Winslnw. rnrdiiiK tn a n n n u n c p i n r n l marl' In W. E. Fl thr A r k a n s a s Railrnarl C'nmniissi-m. \\-ho hern a c l i v p in :*pr!irinj? Ihi-; ( n n ' p : y i n n . The /ir"t cnmP of thr spp?nn \\-a.-: playprl in nn Sprinc'lalo's now h a l l p a r k . Ihp Inr'als h, nppnspri h- ( h p i p a n i f r n r n Itni^pis. \r;u]\- S! h n = hnpn ::ppiit in i m p r n v m ( ; ',!». pa^ a l u | |, n ins c n n i n m r l i n u ^ hlparhpr:.. t r i p Fnrt ·rl nf has .nnn ild- Tft\ Yrars Affn Today (Nnrthwp.s! A r k a n s a s TimP«. .lunp 9. 1042) Twn F a y p t l r v i l l p High Sphool hoy^ lv p r p plpctcd tn county n f f j p p s ai ih» Arkansas Boys Stalp r a m p in L i t t l e Hnrk. t h i s wrek. Ellis Bnr- Cin. Matintial Pai-ty mcn-iher, was elected circuit clerk nf ··Harrisnn rnunty" anH Andy Barron, a n n t h r r N a t i o n a l i s t , d p f r a t p d G. A. McKr.e. Fed- p r a l i s l , nf Fort Smith for judge of "Webster county." In rpspnmr lo rrcsiilpnt Hoospvelt's appeal fnr " p i r k - u p - l h p - i uhhcr" campaigns in pflrh lo- r a l i t y . w. F. Sonncman. Inral theater manafer has announced in Timps a call fnr "I.nnn old tires" for ivliich frpp t i c k e t s w i l l he given to any theater in Fayctteville. Twenty Years Acn Today ( F a y e l l p v i l l p I ) , l i l y D r i n i i p r a t . .Tiinf fl. ins:!) Nearly 200 nne d n l l a r h j i h w i l l he given away In visitors in F:n'cHeviUc. S a l i i r t l a v . The dollars, which h a v p hecn nn display in 100 slnrc. windows over trnvn. w i l l f i n d new owners Questions And Answers Q--Why is the hald eagle so called, since Its head is covered w i t h f e a t h e r s ? A--The word "hald" is from a m i d d l e F.njlish word m e a n i n e white. When three year? of aflf Ihe feathers nf the head anri neck become pure w h i t e , and a l w a y s remain so. Q -- W h a t f i u i t depends on a small wasp to make it grow? A--The Smyrna fif. The f r u i t does not grow from a flower hut contains the flnwors inside thp w a l l s nf the f r u i t . The flowers must be pollinated hy the fig wasp, a parasitic insect. T I I R BTORTt J»rk IlvcjCtm. · p r l * a t « r t r l r f l l t ^ , u murfrr**! i n r t p r hr pMirM ·· TnjrhllllrliM I I A K l l W l l l l M f af · d i n n e r t Ihv hOtKr ·! Hr. Xlmmrr, ·!·( · v*r- r h l f i l r l M I , Th» itaMr n i c k t K H i h - f r l N r Stm«*. «Kr« ··« hllnd. tflrk rritrr. · ton. U »«l«rMrri. bit !· ri*l*r« kr H A v l l . ,%rlthrr l.nr?- rrnrr Httr hlc ilaMKliIrr I'rrilllii arr · hip nr irltllHIC !· I'll r i a r l l j rfklll itrmrrrd ··,! MaiiitMlii II villa «n MN« NhMrt't. nrrmiirT. m n k r · rrf^rt «· Ik* fnrty In l l n M l l . The KMrHI*. kt MiKl. virr* "a l i t t l e · · · XXVII r-HARr.OTTE DF.AN went on. "Mr. Yorke wasn't In the least uneasy. He didn't stammer, even hesitate or anything like that. Hut he did seem a little--weary nil evening and rather silent- As for 'Ilr. 7.immcr . .." Charlotte smiled. ."Hai that man ever been ill at ease in his life? Hc'j always the 'perfect host, xenial and constder- ,atf, an readj lo listen as lo talk, ibut never at a loss for a word when jthere lit an awkward pause. And · «o vastly eivtl, as they said in the 1 1 8 t h century! H* wears his courtesy like armor and it makes him quite Impenetrable to ordinary mortals like myself. Hut I do like t him. Anrl Mr. Shaw was very attentive to me." "You've forgotten Mrs. Mann," Mid Olsela. "She was just as usual. Not very profound in her conversation, perhaps, hut always amiable and smiling." Charlotte's own smile was rueful. "I know this is not the sort of thing you wanted to hear, Hr. Willing, but as nothing else happened, all I can report nre these gossipy l i t t l e details lhat ean't have much Inlerent for you. I won't nay I'm irorry. It woultl have been dreadful l( lhat Idea of , yours about MlM .Shaw had turned out to be the truth. I'm glad If I've helped you lo prove It wasn't so." MasH's Tarn waa grave as he answered he.r. "My drar Mlwi Khaw, nothing has been proved ret 1'n warned you of possible danger. Let me repeat that warning." "Oh." tier eyes clouded. "And I thought it was all over . . .** "Have you thought any more about this?" From his desk Hasil took the scrap of paper they had found in Miss Shaw's copy of Keats. "I haven't had time, really. 1 Charlotte fumbled at her jabot and detached a long, slim, Italian lorgnette. Daintily the peered through the lenses at the grubby scrap of paper. "All those letters and figures--4C104WS--the combination of a safe?" "It looks more like a receipt for something that eosts $30," said Gisela. "Something Indicated by 4C104WS. Don't department stores use code numbers to indicate the type and Pi7e of clothing or other merchandise?" This isn't a department store tag or sales slip," answered Hasil. "There's no printing. Just a handwritten scrawl.* "Then I really have no Idea what it is." The lorgnette snapped shut and dropped to dangle from its black ribbon. "I'm sorry to be of so l i t t l e help to you!" "Oh, but you have been a great :leal of help," returned Basil. "More, perhaps, t h a n you have any Idea. And let me remind you of your promise not to mention this slip of paper to anyone. It would be dangerous." · · · soon us Charlotte had Rone, fJisrla turned lo h i m in ania?e- ment. "You didn't tell her about Stephen Lawrence!" It would have altered her Impression of the whole evening and distorted every observation in* made," he cxpiancd. "It's strange she hnsn't henrd about It already from nomeoiw else." "You think «rT I*wrence Isn't ftninr. lo talk about «omelhln( that might h« construed a« hit attempt at milcldt nr hit da'.i|nt«r'i attempt at mercy-kllllna:. NttUM* I* ahe. I ,in*H a** r*port M «· uy. one as anythinf but accident, for I have no evidence that it was anything else. Probably no one who was at that dinner last Friday bas the slightest suspicion of what happened to Lawrence afterward--except the person responsible for it." Gisela looked at him tn consternation. "So they're all going to dine together again Friday night! Can't you do something?" Basil did not appear to be listening. He was looking at the grubby scrap of paper with it* scrawl of letters and figures--4CI04WS . . . That evening after dinner, he went to the bookshelves where he kept the old books he had inherited from his grandparents and took down a slim volume in mottled boards with spine and corners : leather--the sort of binding used in the ]»th century when a magazine or pamphlet was bound at the owner's expense. He was so absorbed that Gisela finally looked over his shoulder to sec what it was. "Dickens! Of all thingsl "Mrs. Lirriper's Legacy.' I never heard of it" "It's an interesting story--or rather an interesting collection of storlen--told by Mrs. Lirriper's lodgers. One of them Is curiously modem, with the atmosphere that preceded the French Involution doubling for the unrest of our own limes. Vet my grandmother bon|ht this on a railway station platform in 1870." · · · pIRFJ.A saw him reading th« VJt book several limes In the next 'ew days, but It wai not until Friday afternoon that he put It (town with a new look In his eyes --a look of decision and excitement. "You've got an idea!" she exclaimed. "Several ideas." "Tell me!" "I think I know why Duggan was killed and how." "Did you get It from something Vrdlla omitted?" "No. From something she added. Jnn«essnrlly. There Isn't tlm« to alk now. I've only a coup)* at hour* before then* people meet again at Dr. Zlmmer'*. Dn · havt · atrmt map nf Manhattan?" |T» a .Saturday afternoon. The treasure hunt will start al. 'I p. m. Recause nf the universal appeal of cnsh money, thp cash gift stunt combined .with a c o m m u n i t y wide o f f e r i n g nf bargains, is exprrtpd in d r a w one of the biggest shopping crowds ever sren hrrp. About .?60n d a m a g e rpsulted from high w i n d Wednesday at thp Skating R i n k south of town, when a q u a r t e r spction of the tent was blown o u t . it hrramc known l a t e yesterday. The tent is being repaired and no damage tc. the floor resulted. H a i l did some damage in Green Acres to rorn and grapes it was reported. Br WALTRR MPPMAN'N The program for last week sel speeeh and nn written docu- whlph General Eisenhoxver agreed m e n t , can dn this because so rare- In whil» he wai n t l l l in Paris, and ly n n w a d a y s are they the work of th«n curried n u t , was a searrhlns Ihp man h i m s e l f . t*«t nf his own nfrve.s. Thp lest Thai is why the country, quitt showed t h a t he wan thp inner r i g h t l y , is paying mueh more »1- durability. the composure, and i r n h m to th* press conference Ihe self-confidence, w i t h o u t which lhan in Ihp set .speech on WerJnes- public men, nn m a t t e r what their day aflernoon. For lhat speech, other gifts, must crack up and lie I h n u n h no dnubl General Eisen- nverwhelmed in the crisis of our ys. V.'iihir; the space of se\en days, and w i t h o u t a day of rest in which howpr wrote it hims»lf, has cert a i n i.f ,'ip t e l l l a l e marks -- I would e\-en say footpnnts--^f h a ' i n c been edited by a commit- lee. This spectacular week has lo calch his breath and collect hi* wits, he was c a t a p u l t e d from one career to another. If he had shown, i t h i n k beyond serious been the man whn is shot out of dispute, t h a t Eisenhower has great a cannon in the circus, it cnuld personal filness for high office not have been more a b r u p t . The and for the storm and stress which change in his way nf life Is great- lie ahead of the next president, er and sharper t h a n t h a t nf any He is made for difficult times and other man we have yet seen, i t ; I believe l h a t his own qualities seems to me something to m a r v e l ' bring out in others the qualities a t , something really extraordin- l h a t are most needed in times ary. that he took it all in h i s . when the decisions are hard, stride w i t h o u t being r a t t l e d in the I find ii deeply reassuring that least or breaking down Into phon- w i t h o u t any evasiveness he has fness.^ · l e f t himself e n t i r e l y uncommitted This, however, is the same mnn ·· for the great issues of war and who bore the terrible burcVen o f ; peace which lie ahead of us, and Ihe finjrl decision lo l a u n c h or to t h a t he i.s therefore free to deal postpone tbe Normandy invasion, w i t h t h e m on their merits. His smiling good n a t u r e is not nn Prrhsps it would be better to act. something lo be learned and say t h a t he has left a new ad- practired. It is the outer sign of a m i n i s t r a t i o n free to deal with the person whn has been through the critical issues on their merits. For great tests nf l i f e has met them what Kisenhower is o f f e r i n g the and has acquired thr s c l f - c o n f i - country is not the messianic donee of one wbo knows he has i "leadership" of one whn knows nothing w i t h i n to hide or to with- ! the way and is calling on the 'Id- | country to follow him in a cru- The press conference in its sarie. Nobody knows the way. 'ullest modern development as at Those who pretend thst they Abilene, Is an nrdeal which know it are fools or knaves, searches a man's personality far What Eisenhower is offering more deeply t h a n it does his the country is a chance to rally principles and his policies. The and eather tosether. and by this nress conference has become an very rallying and gathering to- institution, created by t h e Amcr- gether to f i n d the way tn solve ican press, for overcoming t h a t problems and to overcome rjan- jrowing IhreRt to honest journal- pers t h a t are insoluble and over- sm, Ihe ghost-written speech and w h e l m i n g as long as the country he public relations facade. remains so divided. When it is operating f u l l y , as it vas at Abilene, it is v i r t u a l l y im- This is the Washingtonian model j possible to get away w i t h decep- of t h e presidency. It is the style of I lion or evasion. That is to say the Washington whn managed for j lhal it I* v i r t u a l l y impossible in so long and in a most, critical such a specially sophisticated aud- period of our history to keep both ience to pretend tn know more H a m i l t o n and Jefferson in his t h a n you do know, or to pretend cabinet. In have taken a hoid stand when If we arp lo f i n d nur way to in fact you are s i t t i n g on the ''real peace and security in the fence. world," we shall have to rise And so, w h i l e thp quick answers above thosp internal divisions of | lo the very broad questions do not our own which have poisoned and necessarily, or even o f t e n , throw paralyzed, which are poisoning great liRht nn the problems and · and paralyring. so tragically and the policies, the net result is to it could he so disastrously, thp disclose the man's temperament conduct of our own foreign pol- and personality. Nothing Pise, no jry. Dear Miss nix: Why should a mother deliberately try In di«rnur- ase ft daughter's marriaj?p by rnn- ( i n u a l hplittlinjr r e m a r k s ? She likes my fianrp, hut harps on the fact that marriage isn't w h a t one experts, t h a t I ' l l he snrry I ever marripd, t h a t it's a h u m d r u m l i f p nf household rirnrtjrery, etc. When we are married in J u l y , we plan to live with my in-laws, since my fiance i« the only child. M o t h e r says thin arrangement w i l l never work, t h a t w h i l e my f u t u r e mot h e r - i n - l a w may he f i n r to mp now. she'll chance completely after the wedding day. I am bccominc almost a f r a i d of marriage. Is my mother rijrht in any nf her contentions, or i? there a good chance nf our being h a p p y ? M. D.' Answer: Mother's rtoleful predictions are just !hn riiseruniled moans of embittered middle-age. Having exceeded her own y o u t h -and doubtless h a v i n g m u f f e d mnpt of its opportunities for happineps --it irks her tn see anyone, oven her own daughter, enjoying a blissful romance. There is no reason why two people who love anrl helieve in each nther can't create a happy marriage--as shown by the fact t h a t it's done every day! On one point Mother if right. I f i t ' s at all feasible, you'll be much better off setting up your own establishment from the be- irinnint; of married life than start; ing off w i t h in-laws. Seldom does ,T double household arrangement work out to everyone's satisfaction. Rather than risk the ultimate chance of in-law friction due . to a too-close association, set up your own household. I foresee enoutrh trouble with ynnr nwn mother; don't t a k e any chances on d i f f i c u l t y with the other set of in-laws. If your f u t u r e molhrr-in-law is good to you now. and- you rpcip- rocale her kindness with love and consideration, there is little chance of problems arising from this source. : Don't carry yr.ur mother's pessimism i n f o your new life; let her know that you are not influenced by her disparagement of matrimony. Perhaps you csn be a little Crusader and show, by your own hanpines? and well-being, that married l i f e is not trie thnrny path Mom pictures. Top Brass Answer to Prvviou* Puzzl* 1 HORIZONTAL · VERTICAL IMnrttr - (tb.) 4 - Admiral 8 - Prwident 12 High hill 13 Bacchanal!' cry ram iu i nnnrjar iu -. 3 Blood V_3 Change* In ownership 4 Relate 5 Level 0 Great arteriei unr ir ion 14 Shaketpe*re«n 7 Stalin i« the river ---- top braM ,. _ 15 Age 8 Wind * 3 "" 16 and indicators " Jr 10 *" . Isabella helped 9 Ru««ian top " Portent Columbue brass was onct 26 Top bra;..,... .. ,,..,.-,, »...« , 1 8 H a n g i n i , tht ,,: Argentina . - lmptrtec«y I 20 Czechoslo- Terrible · 2? Enlargement! 142 Mast .~_~* f vakUn formar 10 Ice cream " holder 11 Finishes 17 European 38 South PicUCf · island r"~f"W 40Vestibul«T ' 41 Speak. 4 I president 21 Weight of India ' 21 Monkeys 24 Couch 28 Fruit ' 27 Split pulM 10 Puniih by fining Jl Mediterrin««n ' Ultnd 14 More lucclnct 11 Wlnd-driv«n V«M*1 II Abe tritt being 17 Short letter 31 Flower holder 40 Volcano In Sicllv 41 Permit i 41 fcottlih oak* 4ICIUtmoiWtlt Indlln rtpublk 41 UktMWM SI Mineral rock » WIng-ihap«d MHatt peninsula It Darlings 28 Malt beveragM 43 8l«V, 29 Stringed · ""\ 44 SpoktA^ initrumant i,'46 Upon/ . 31 Middle a 33Cat-lik«Kl MDtptnd M Drtnki Uowly

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