Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas on June 7, 1952 · Page 4
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June 7, 1952

Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas · Page 4

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4 NORTHWIST ARKANSAS TlMtl, tayMHvffi*. Art. Arkansas $\mta Fmmit\l Flr'tUrilU Dilly Dtmocnll Publbh*d dlUT .MC.pl Sund.r bf rAYETTEVILLE DEMOCBAT PUBLISHING COMPANY Rob«rli Tulbriihl, Pruldtnl Saturday, Jun* 7, 1912 Found*! Jun. 14, 1110 Entered at thf post office at F Ark., as Second-Claw Msil M S U P I . Sun E. O.irhirl, Vie* PtM.-G.n.ril Minii.i Till R. Wrllt, Editor ~"MEMBEH~br~THE" ASSOCIATED PRESS ~ The Associated Prenii Is exrlunivtlir rmillcri In th* uie for repubhratirm of at! DIVAS dispatch** credited to it or not otherwise credited in t h u paper and also the local news published herein, All rights of republirfttinn of upecla) dti pitctui herein are also mrrvKl. SUBSCRIPTION RATU P« WMIt . . . ....... U I by m r r t p r j Mill »-fUl In U a R h l n f l n n . n^niun. MAJit'in conn- MM Ark . fend Artair count/, Okla. One month ......... Tic Thre* mrnlht ...... ____ ................... ll ifl Six monthi ........................ _______ II 10 One ytit ......... ............. 1410 H»0 IM cnuntiM other than ibov«: ODA monllt . . . f t to firef month* .......... _. . S'lo Bti monthi ....................................... 14 M) On* M* r ........ .............. f K IW All mill payable In Advinr. Mtmtwt Audll Bur.au of Circulation Editor's Note: The TIMES l« Bl«d to open Us editorial columns to the mi-mhm nf the M i n i s - terial Alliance, who have n/zrred to furnish an editorial p«ch S a t u r d a y . Views expressed are tho«e of the niithor. Need For Vigilance At (he rwpnl I n t o n u t t i o a l ( " n n v p n l i f u i of the Dipriplpf nf Christ, Prosiilrnt Jl. K. Sadler of TPXSB r h r i s l l n n U n i v e r s i t y spoke nn t h p problems nf p r i v a t e i n s t i t u - tions of higher w l i i C H l i n n in the present, American scene, The prohlom fs a m a t t e r of nurvivnl fur the private inst R u t ions with frovprnmcnl-MipiHirted i n s t i t u t i o n s in the favored position. All of tin in Fiiyeltevillo are nirhtly proud of the Univprsrly of Arkansas ami none of IIH nre critical in Ihe leaM nf public institution* of higher c d i i f a t i o n . But most pf us are also members of religious orjanizationn who feel 1h.nl it is nwessury *o m a i n t a i n I h e i r policies n n d universities ror the training of C h r i s t i a n Iwyponuli! as well as thp. morn obvious t r a i n i n g nf m i n - isters, relisrinus ediirators a n d mission, aries. None of us would lip. w i l l i n g to do »«·«· with either t h e p r i v a t e nr puliliY collect. In fnrt, there is a joh for each to do if he is allowed to do it. According; to the report of t h e President'* Commission nn Education the national government ?s moving- in the direction of eliminating all hut t h e most favored private schools. It is t h e i r SIIKKCS- tion that, enrollment in private colleges and universities he frozen at 900,000 students and the enrollment in jrovernment- RUpported schools he advanced tn 3,700,. 000 by 1960. In orrler to provide adequate facilities and f a c u l t y t h e cnrnmissron suggests a national government, subsidy of $3,000,000,000 by I960 for tax supported schools only. This trend, if it continues, will beg-in « speeding up of the process already in motion of weeding- out all nf the ' private schools \vhfch are not h e a v i l y endowed. But the danjrer is not j u s t t o t h e schools alone, hut to t h e American way nf l i f e itself. Private enterprise j s already under fire in many areas--business, medicine, industry and so forlh. Now e d u c a t i o n t a k e s its place n m n n j r agencies nf t h e "American Way" (hat are movhig toward 11 sn- The United States is fnimded iip.,n freedom t o establish a n l m a i n t a i n a n y needed insl.itul ion. f'ollefres were among the first t h i n g s to he "needed" and I h e churches began the process nf developing such hiFtittitinns. These early colleges were the means of I r a i n i n g ministers and C h r i s t i a n laymen and I hoy h a v e c o n t i n u e d to o f f e r a k i n d nf e d u c a t i o n In Ihosc whn desire it t h a t government schnnls cannot offer because of obvious l i m i t a t i o n s . We citizens must accept ri^ponstbilifi- I o r vigilance I n I,,, n - r l a i n t h a t ihew a n i l other i n s t i t n t i n n s of l i k o nan,,-,-, arc not taken from us by our own g o v e r n m e n t a-id our tax money, 1 do not t h i n k i h i n j j, malicious i n t e n t i o n ; oniy n lack of reali/.-i tion of wh.il rs happeniiiL'. The iv^por^i b l l i t y i s o i i r s t o s e e t h a t p r i v a t n c a l i o n JS allowed to exist side by side w i t h excellent t a x - s u p p o r t e d ci'illetc versifies. R.V the Kev. Knl.erl M n f f H t t rnsior Fir.t C h r i s t i a n Clmrcli THE WASHINGTON Merry-Go-Rotmd ·r DREW PEAHSON W a s h i n g t o n - - T h e A r m y has hushed It up, hut t h e two key leneruls In the Koje Island fi- HH'a almost «nl off the honk w i t h a liahl reori- m a n d . It wa« only by direct order from Gen. M a r k ("lark, thp new Far Eastern rnmt:isnder, t h a t the r e p r i m a n d was torn up and G e n e r a l s Franni Dndd and Charles Colson were, busted Dndd fcnl h i r n u p l / k i f l n a p c d by C o m m u n i s t prisoners nf w « i . and lo n b t a i n h i » releaie. Col- snn agreed tn enncefsions t h a t played right into t h e C o m m u n i s t propaganda theme. U n t i l fjpn- e i a l Clark I n t e r v e n e d , the A r m y was going ah"H w i l h the usual w h i t e w a s h . Tl · A r m y is always q u i r k to d i s c i p l i n e en- liRlp'l men, slower tn d i s c i p l i n e j u n i o r officers, h u t p r a c t i c a l l y never t a k e s d r a s t i c a c t i o n a g a i n - l the h i g t i hras*. Sn, In keeping w i t h this t r a d i t i o n , a flnnrd of I n q u i r y rernmtnenderl a r e p r i m a n d for Dndd and C'nlson and their super l n r , M a j . Gen. Paul F. Y n u n t . Gen. .lames Van Fleet, whn. as the iop comm a n d e r in Knie,i, was t e c h n i c a l l y responsible for "he K n j e I s l a n d POW camp, approved nf Ihe l o p r i m a n d s anri sent Iheni up f n r Clark's signa- t u r e . Hut C l a r k had stepped I n t o a hornet's nest when he tonk over the Far F.aslern cnmmand, and he was in no rnond fm a w h i t e w a s h . Me ap- prnvrH of thp r e p r i m a n d for Y o u n t , but ordered Dodc. and Colson busted. * * ·* It Isn't o f t e n t h a t Ihe Illness of a n a l l n n ' l f i r s t lady can change Ihp p o l i t i c a l l i f p of a country, hut t h a t ' « whal's l i k e l y to happen in Argent i n a . F.vita Pi-ron, clamorous w i f e of the Argent i n e illclator, is dying. The lady who began l i f e as a cabaret performer and rnsp to c a p t u r e Ihe love of ihe A r g e n t i n e lower classes and the hale of the upper classes, has cancer. Doctors have warned t h a t she cannot last the summer. While II may not be p l e a s a n t , even for harrl- bn'led diplomats, to sit by and w a t c h a woman die. nevertheless the c a p i t a l s of I . a l i n America in.- molly c a l c u l a t i n g w h a t w i l l he t h e e f f e c t s of r\'ita d e a t h on r e v o l u t i o n nnd war. Last f a l l shp was operatpd on for a cancerous condition nf tin, upppr i n t e s t i n e and d u o d e n u m . In December her doctors came to thp decision l h a t she could not be p e r m a n e n t l y cured, put her on a careful schedule, advised t h a t witli j p s l and care she m i g h t live two years. K v i t a obeyed t h e doctors' orders u n t i l t h e end of February. Hy t h e n she was f e c l i n e so m u c h bettor t h a t she decided the due-tors were wrong. Besides she got to worrying ahnul her Social Aid F n u n d a l i o n . her c h a i i t i e p . and her work In Ihe Labor D e p a r t m e n t . So, since M.ii-.-h she has been hack on a f u l l woik sciiedu'e Though she looked pale and d r a w n shp seemed an f u l l of energy av ever. On the night of May 24. however, following a small d i n n e r at the P r e s i d e n t i a l Palace. E v i l n collapsed. The news was kept secret fnr 72 hnurs while extensive blond tests were t a k e n Then four physicians broke the news lo President Peron t h a t his wire had nnly weeks tn live. A meagre a n n o u n c e m e n t which referred o n l v to the "recurrence of t h e first lady's preyjn'is .complaint" was enough to set o f f ' a wave of demonstrations all over Argentina. Special masses were, celebrated and pilgrimages tn Huenoi Aires were organi/ed by Peronisla work- Hut none of the loyal followers knew t h a t Iheir b e a u t i f u l , sometimes ruthless patroness was on her deathbed at nnly 34. W i t h her passing part nf Ihe power of her husband will v a n i s h At t h a t time il Is speculated a griof-mrirke'ii president may un abrnad In live. Peron has a deep and g e n u i n e affection for his wife. Or th- Argfnllne m i l i t a r y , long h a l i n g Kvila and her labor following, may seire the o p p o r t u n i t y to revolt. Seldom has a country's d e s t i n y been so wrapped up in a woman. * * * W i l h b i l l i o n s of dollars in under-orean oil at slake, Ihe nil Inhbyisls are p o u r i n g on Ihe he*' m a lad. desperate hid tn override the president's t i d e l a n d s vein. The h u l t n n b n h n c .,' m | hackstace huddles are g r o w i n g more Rrim, and t a l k of f a t campaign c o n t r i b u t i o n s is r i f e in Sena t e cloakrooms. Thp decision h a n g s by such a slim spld,..- web s t r a n d t h a t Wyoming', h a u l i n g Sen Joe () M a h n n e y . seeking to uphold thp vein lias cabled bis Democratic colleague. Sen. J i m ' M m ray of M o n t a n a , to rush hack from Europe m T | h e l p hold t h e line. The .showdown vote is expected about Tuesday. Thp h i l l o r i g i n a l l y passed the Senate hy a ii to-35 vote, w h i e h is no! rnnugli to override a vein. Rul t h e oil lobbyists have been s l i p p i n g around the Senate Office B u i l d i n g , press,,TM, I IP senators who vnted against t h e m tn dn ,,,, j i l . o u t - s w i t c h or conveniently s k i p t n w n when Ihe vein vole j« t a k e n . First lo c a p i l u l a l e to the oil lohbv was Se^ A r t h . i r W , » i k i n s . I l e p u h l i c a n . whn faces a to.-'h ir-l,.ction f i g h t in I ' l a h thu ye, l r He v,s p n v a t o h pledged to change his vote despite ae peals fro,,, P l a n schonls and school' teachers .,, vole for federal ennlrol which, under thp 'll.ll lull y,,u,d d i v e i t the nil r o y a l l y to educalion O t h e r senators on t h e side of the presided w h n h a v e h i n t e d they m a y have i m p o r t a n t h,,,i. ness out ,.f .own next week, a r e : Democrat .tohnson of ( otm-arlo and M a g n u s o n of W a t h M i Ion. plus R e i m h l i c n i K Case of South Dakota and r.clon of M o n t a n a . M n t of ihe 12 senators whn ,,ii«rd Ihe fi-«| vote a , e counted on In t h e nil lohhv i,, V1 ',,,, nr.a,,,,, ,he VP.O. i n c l u d i n s Senatois H r e w M e r of "·"_""· "" l! '''- o( N'cnra.ka. D i r k s e n , The Large Uneconomical Size yii DO i. Every 'i AGOMEV CRIES HCR HEAD OFF OVER TVIIfJSS 1M GENERAL A^O ^U FRiEKDS IK PARTICULAR* -"·~-~- Jiy JimmyJHado] ^^SS^"" Jenner of I n d i a n a n i i c l Kem of Missouri. Of Ihp do/pn, onlv two nrf k n n w : i In b on the sidr- of Hie pi rodent -- SrnMnr:- K - f . - n j v r T i.f Tennessee a r d K i l j n r e of Wc't V u K : i : i : i . !.. !-.if l l l a i e Senators D u f f o f P e , i n « v l v : i n : a . K c r i r ! O k l n h o m a . Ln'U'p of M.-i^.-u-hun-'!. , S i M i : n of New Jersey and Thve of M,nn''s.-i.i. S l i o t m t t pressures are on Kerr. who is ;1 ,·!,,,,, f , ; r n , | ,,t Ihi- oil lobby k i t also aspires !o be prr-.:iricil!. II is a r|iic«lion of w h e t h e r ln p u c k r t h i v . k i n - terests w i l l oiitv.-eit;h h i « p n h i i c a l a m b i t i o n s . The oil lobbyists are ah-e.-niv l)o;is;j.,p pri\T,'r- l.v l h a t they have all the voles t h e y nerd in 'i'n hag. In c o n t r a s t t h e vo,,-e of j-ehnol teachers on the other side seems f a i n t and feeble. ftetuiett Gebl A Hnll.vu'ooH n c r n t , n s n a l l v very rhippcr ?*t Hrspnnrlrntly nt t h p scwln nninU'r nf Schwab'? Pharmnry. " W h a s s a m a t t i - r V " ar.krrl a f r i r n r l nnxlously. "it's t h a i now Hicnl I'm rrpri":pni- ine." srnanrrl t h e .-.sent. -Sines likr. i.nn«i. f i c h t s likr Flynn. and nets l i k n V i r t n r Mature." -Sn why (In yon worry." laiighcvl !ho f r i e n d . "You'll m a k e a m i l i n n n u t nf t h i s -uy." " G u v n o t h i n g , yiill dnpe," cried tin- .-.uciu "Il's ;i C i r i l , 1 " * * * rva,.'fi.';il j o k i T y ,-ir,, I i ; i v i i 2 I h e i r i n n i n g s a g a i n in thp f i l m c;ipit:il. One j i y n i i i ( ( ;- u n k f nn a r i v a l at fni;i in the- innflli!-,; M-|i!i a n . ' i n r ! ;Hi'- R r a m t h a t ro.vi. · I ' m in nival srr.rr-. N V v e r ' f r i ! h o t t e r in my l i f e . ' Two d:iys i n t e r h,- rri'eivrri a h r a u t i f n l l y wrapped pa.-karr nn w l n r h the d»- l i v c r v rharce l o t n l l e r l c:i;ht dnl!,,,-.:. \Viie. 1 : lie f i n a l l y got ihe w r a p p i n g s c.ff. t h e n - \va:: d;.-;;']n-eri a ynlid s'ah fif ennrrele v.-j;ti t i n - . n-es:,-;ce i,« it f i n m hi.': r i v a l : "Here is I h e v e j ^ h t -,, f i l l win- l i f t e d f r n m nv.- ·,::·'.··:' ' * ' * * A druggist had t,, f;,,, ].; s ,.|,; r f ; rently. -1 never knew a m;,n w'r-i doclnr's presmnti.in nmri.. cnnVkly." I "and you c e r t a i n l y have kepi the stork In apple- pie order. R u l we've got lo face il. Joe: you make y u u r chicken salad too darn salty " * * * They Ml n f a voting nurse named Grey W h o n i b b l e d a t f r u i t a l l t h e d a y . She's now h o s p i t a l i z e d , sad to say, And a doctor a day keeps the apple avva'- * * * Fred A l l e n , fond of p o i n t i n g out Ihp a n t i q u i t y of mosi movies shown on TV. swears he caught one Western so old that the cowbov was riding a dinosaur. * * * An interior decorator sent Mrs. Noiiveau a Louis the Fourteen c h a i r on approval. Mrs N returned il w i t h a note t h a t read. "This chair ii-n't q u i t e big enough. Have you » Louis th» F i f t e e n t h one in stock? 1 Questions And Answers Q--When wore laws first passed in this country to pension wounded war veterans? A -1792: to aid veterans of the Revolutionary War. Q--Where was the firsl naval h a l t l e in the Revolutionary W a r f o u g h t ? A -- O f f Machias. Maine in 177?. Q--Why can a spider freely wa!k over ils own web when other insects are i m m e d i a t e l y held r a n t i v p . A--The spi.ler coals its own legs w i l h an oily substance from i!': m o u t h Q--Are pineapples grown in the United Slates? A--Yes: in F l o r i d a . Q -- H a s .in cl^eirnnic piano been developed? A--.Yes. It is l i k e any other p i a n o , except t h a t il has nn s n u n r i i n n hoard. Thp s o u n d is regulated by an electric n i c k - u p , and t h e volume can he controlled jusl as in a r a d i o . Q - W h i c h s t a t e adopted t h e first unemplnv. merit i n s u r a n c e l a w ? A--Wisconsin, in lfl:!2. TMK STORY t .Inrfc I)n Kr T» t r r l n n m rln THERE'S THE / PHOUE. 1 / -" 1 TWEEiM .AWO ODE ? TD«E! xxi BRUTE! KNOW I THE-M .' THE WAY SHE UXXS GOWJ WEI? MOSE~ ·»£ 1HW8S SHE'S SAID /POUT OS-- II MATE in X X V I IKIT it was not u n t i l late a f l r r - nonii ttuit (.'h.-irluth-- Hr;,n matle her .-quMraiico at llic W i l l - CliarloMp dorlinrd tn: arropled icc:\ tea. d u t ^ , was frrsh n i i f l ti i-n as spotless w h i i r hnl nnd Rlovps tiir.t liroiiRht out thp p n t s p r n of h r r h l n r k anrl w h i t p p r i n t . But she soon hplrayrrl t-rnhnrrnrsnirnt. "]'VP bppn dpbnimf* nil dny whrMior I .'.hMi]fi .=;rc you nr not, Dr. W i l l i n g . I n p j i r l y rirridnd not tn rnmc hoi P at all. I'm nnt ufpd In spying and. a f t r r last niiilit, I frit n l i t l l p nshnmcd as well as n l i t t l r silly." "Why?" "Or pause nothlnft happpnrd. Z n\ till. And tn t h i n k l h a l I had over Mi^prr'.iM ;my tine i*f those pirn van t, p r r f o c l l y n n i t n a l M;i5il smilnl. " A r c yuu M i r p yon wpn-n'l n l i t t l e d i v a p p n i i i t i - d , Inn?" "Of course not. I u,-. i p l i c v r j , ifih I n d m i t H i n t , u h r n you -TIP n i l kpyrd up like t h a t and n n l h i t i R hnpppn!--, you can't hMp rlinR n l i t l l n Id dnwn n f l o r x v n n l . nMpnd nf ,I 0 (in nf Arc or M;ita H n n , I'm ju;:t r h a r i m t r IV,in n f l p r n l l . as I Muiuld li.-tvr known BA^I! oid not Appear In urRr her. "Hnw w»s S t f p h r n l.nwrenrc Inst nisM?" he inriulied f.iMinlly, "In f x r f U r n t npiriln, murh more my thftn nsiul, lln run ho very n m u p i n c wlien ho \$ In thp mond. 1 foil it .Mich p privilrfip tn sit next In him ;it table. I don't know him very \ypll, hut I've always udmirec his vrrsp." "Did his high spirits go on to thp end?" "Oh, yes. Tic and Perdita were a m n n u t h e first tn Icnve and heard him l a u g h i n g as he \vent nut the f n m t door. Such a light, musical laugh for a man!" G;sela .shivprexi. As he left that hous", Stephen Lawrence had 1,'ui^ln-d. W i t h poison already his bloodstream? Or the set will to pin'cido already in his heart? "And P e r d i f a ? " Masil was say- tnjj. "Was i h e gay. too?" · · * " · C l I K yp^med r a l l i e r lived, bu k p h p a l w a y s scorns tired. Dr. X n n m e r did his host to cl-eer her up. They had q u i t e a l i t t l e trte- n - l c t e wlirn she llvst pn| there, I'.ut J h a t was t h e nnly lime Perriita mwed any a n i m a l inn at all." "You dnn't k n o w \\ hnt they ".\o. Tliry ·.-.·tire at the other end of t h p room." "I'm sure K n s a m u n d Yorke was thp lovel'pst w o m a n there," remarked c;i.ela. "Mrs. Ynrko was n l i t t l e hit . . ." C h a r l o t t e paused Tor a word. "Dist e n t , I thru«ht. vlammercd." "Mow was t h a t ? " linn ("i:tip s \ v t f t l y . "Let me see. . . , Mr. Yoike wa« m a k i n g p l a n ? f n r next snminrr. Me «aid f n i n r t l i i n c about noinR lo i : u n i p i - and nsked Mrs. Yorke if :-he c.nild nn w M h him on a cert ' l i n rialf. Slip s t a T t e d to sny sonie- i h i n j j h!:e: 'Why, of ponrso. We'll t;n hy :ur on thp first of July , , ,' I'.ut. h a l f - u a y I h r n t j g h the sen- tenrr. her voice enupht nnd htr orils j.tumliled. She «toppcd xMklnn ' n r a moment And then ent on in n less n a t u r a l lone of i;r». .No diviM it was the memory of the l.int lime that wo were it Ir. Dimmer'* together ihnl wt Ijw nervfft. Now I eomc to think nt It, tltortt wtr* nevcra! Onee she even Basil's ques- others who swmed 1o 7?el "the Fame way in the beginning. "And who were these others?" "Isolda Canning and her husband. You would hardly think either would be sensitive to at- mosphp.rp, hut they murt be. Mr. Canning was t a l k i n g about Die atom Lnmb such an unpleasant subject. He said, 'If ever it comes Isolds and 1 =ire going to . . .' and then hp. stopped. Mr. Yorke finished the sentence for him. 'Run, not walk, to the. nearest exit?' Mr. Canning nodded bii* he didn't say any more." "And no one mentioned .Dug- Kan?" · * * ~\F course not." Charlotte's ' tone Rpntly rebuked the idea that anyone would be guilty of such a breach of decorum. "But I suppose Dnggan must have been in everyone's m i n d at first," she a d m i t t e d . "I could s*^ when we Cot f h p r p that Mrs. Mann was working hard to put everyone at ease. And Dr. 7,immer, too. H* .-as all t h i n g s to all men, even discussing metre and inflection L-ith Stephen I.awrpnce. I heard them when they wcrn Ftandins; hesinV the fireplace just before dinnr 1 -, anri I was quite entranced, : pnoiflnt as I am of such things, Hr. Zimmer listened .^n intently, one. h a n d on Ihe mantel, looking down at the fire. It needed poking, tut he didn't touch ft u n t i l Mr. Lawrence had finished what he was faying. Toward the end of he. evening everyone (teemed much more comfortable. Rpsiim- thpsp dinners as if n o t h i n g had happened i* probably the. best way to lay the ghost of pnnr Dug- jan. Mrs. Mann told me i h n l T)r. /,iminer asked her tn point thjit nit to rarh of his p a t i e n t s in her nvitalinn and hr's probably right, Jpvt time we will havp forgotten ill about Pnggnn now we've irnken the. Ice." '\Sn there is lo be a next limp?" "Of rourKP." Charlotte \va.i m i l d l y dirconcerterl. "We're all dining there again next Friday." "Was Mr. Shaw one of the tin- ·any one.it?" Basil asknd. "Oh, no, Ho was in very food nrm. And serrnM really quit* ttcntivo to m«." (T* Ita HAL BOYLE New Ynrk-WVHe didn't se.cm' supporter, watching him via video like the same man. M i l l i o n s of in a I.ong Island home, turned off Americans must h a v e f e l t t h a t his set and said sadly: way AS they u-atchrd the r t n r t l i n s "Oh. he'? lost it. he's ]ost it. The contrast in D w j g h t 0. Eisenhnw- weather ruined him." fr's first two major television ap- ; pearances as a p n l i t i c a l figure. ; Fisenhnwer himself may have There wa« high drama between Rone to bed figuring he had hard- the two events and thnsp whn ly cut down the distance between viewed them both will Inr.s re- him and the presidency. But any member them. One saw a r e t i r i n g good soldier is an all-weather cam- gcnpral at hi? worst. The oihcr paigner. The next day he made a saw ikp at b.is hrsi. ( major counter-attack. In a well- Flvprylhinj? conspired a g a i n s t ' lighter! local theater Eisenhower Eisenhower in thp d p l i v p r y nf hi. c facpri hundreds nf newsmen and ipening address, read from a ore- let t h e m pitch questions at him by pared text in the rain to a t h e rlnzens about his candidacv. drenched hometown K a n s a s He bailed t h e answers back like hrong. It was a visual riud. a pic- labie t e n n i s balls, nic t h a t failed- tn come o f f , a let- '_ Ike looked like ]ke, he acted like down after long m o n t h s nf p l a n - ' Ihp n l d . self-confident I k e . He · """*· . InokerJ i r i m and fit in a gray suit Eisenhower fought hard, but t h a t fitted him as well as his uni- his m n n who had led m i l l i o n s was form. now a one-man army on a sod- ' This was whaf he l i k e d -- t h i n k - den p l a t f o r m . The bad l i s h t i n j : ing fast on his feet. He laughed made him look years older--and g e n i a l l y , ?oon had the newsmen tired. The wind whipped; t h i n n i n g j o i n i n g in, sometimes applauding h a i r s across his balding top. his quick extemporaneous an- He spnke vigorously, s q u i n t i n g swers. at his t e x t t h r o u g h heavy glares. HP was complotnly at ease. He Rut there were nn verbal bombs shruqeed, tuggert at an ear, mck- m his speech. The applause was ; erl back and forth on his feet. scattering, sometimes i l l - t i m e d . Eisenhower glanced about u n - threw out his hands in forceful e m p h a t i c gestures. "My passion is the public, in- certainly. He hunched deeper i n t o tere?i." he said at one point. He his raincoat. . . Read anmly faster, j was never at a loss fnr words. Tie The flag? at hie back h u n g l i m p - · used "?ky-hooting" to describe ly. A local character wandered rising costs, said Americans were fiack nnd forth behind him. paup- l i v i n g "on a high plateau of ten- . ing now and then lo pay *'h-ray" : sion." and clap his hands. At ihe elope., asked "How do you W h a t wa F w r o n g ? Kisenhnwer's l i k e t h i s routine? 1 ' he grinned, stubborn face had lost its famous then said e a r n e s t l v : grin. It wore instead I h p weary "When I put my hand io any dignity of an i n f a n t r y m a n n n a plow, I know only one rule--to long march. But there was no dig- work as hard 35 you possibly ran m t y in the s i t u a t i o n around him I don't want to lir to you and Ram had wrecked his opening bat- say 1 lovp all this. I do say that "*- I am in it now with heart and ' When he ended, an Eisenhower soul. . . ." Drjir Mis? Dix: Any h e l p you this pninf rmi have *hovn ad- can give w i t h my problem w i l l be mirable discernment. Your inend- grpatly appreciated. Some months ship. .10 openly bestowed and imago I met. a boy of 24 who works . s e l f i r h l y shared, has already gone at the same place I do. He would j a long way towards restoring say "hello" to me occasionally, Jim's f a i t h ' i n people. The next then onp day we began talking involves even greater con- a h n n t sports, in w h i c h I am q u i t e ' .tidcratinn from you interested. We discovered mu- H . N , H . v r 'i. n A 1.... Hh«. and he «k, d ,, he TM, M · "'^'^"^ , f r i , n d something, hfd f a l l in with it. may accept possibility that he your friendship, then srjr ,·£-"*.,- j-;. £«.-."^r^rr^ from wnrk.'ind ».«k me tn a movie 1h»t evening. Then it occurred tn me t h a t his d i f f i c u l t y miirht he a gamble, and only you csn decide if it's worth it. I'd say it was! The contingency is possible, h u t , I t h a t there are s t i l l such things in Ihe world as f a i t h . loyalty and sincerity. He'll realize that, thp htlls. Appreciate the situation^ , JogT^ S \t ^. being recognized \vith a chronic illness, and Ji lives alone, probably p a y i n g good part of his f a t h e r ' s medical and rewarded ! U n t i l .Jim regains his pelf- . suggesting- free concerts, or the liko, when we went out. befo nmooi HP .--aid «""'* h " lan "- v rl-p six n- still Inve anyone else. He sairt he liked me, but could never Invp me. Sylvia. Answer: Von have a fine comprehension of (he problem already, and ynur h a n d l i n g nf a d i f - f i c u l t s i t u a t i n n is to he commended. Your understanding of .hm S * ekl Ral * Bo ° l1 must he carried a little f u r t h e r . He has hart a very u n h a p p y l i f e : . vr . Let him come a r o u n d to a normal approach to f r i e n d s h i p . I'd like very much, to know how your case progresses. I'm cheering for you on t h e sidelines. W a s h i n g t o n - f / P ) - T h e Western Union Telegraph Company pe.ti- the treatment accorded him by I'"'"" 1 } hf . e^'crnmem vesterday the ponple upon whom hp mnst Hepenried for !n\ p and s y m p a t h y m i g h t easily h a ' p pmbitlpred h i m permanently. Small wonder t h a t he is now so reluctant to risk the possibility nf being hurt again. In your relationship with him up tn ior a u t h o r i t y tn raise its domestic IIIPSS^KP and money order rates 9.3 por r » n t . It said the boost is needed to pay its employes more money. 7-ooloKicaily man Is called homo sapiens. Colorado Trek Antwer toPreyious Puul* HORIZONTAL 1 Capital of Colorado 1 Colorado is th( ·' Slate" 13 Revokes, as legacies M Reluctant ., IS Analyzed 3 Fiddling Roman 4 Chaste 5 Prince 6 Royal Society of Dublin (ab.) 'Leg (slang) 8 Ellipsoidal figures grammMic»lly 9 Dormice . 25 Demigod 4SSII for * ;10Sea soldier in Fall in drops 2S Kind of tide portrtit, ^ I T S t r u c k 11 Domesticslive 23Shield bearinf 46Bon« ^ lSL«»r*d - 12 Require 30 Have nn 18 One verwd in 20 Desire with 38 Pillager · Arabic literature 2.1 Post 2« Sorrowful 27 Winter precipitation 31 Too ,' 32 Before (prefix) '3,1 Before ,34 Oriental ninw 35 Man's name .iBWinjIike part 37 R a v i n e 39 Hot flnx 40 M i m l c k e r ·UUnelnu-is 44 Thread cylinder 47 Small islands SI Pertaining to mail .'3 Garment part M Hebrew «seelir M Shepherd M Costlier M Com pound ethers VIITICAL I nibblw J K I n d of th««f eagerness 40 Affirm 21 Fruitless 42 Carpenter's 22 Form a notion tool 23 Girl 43 Irritates 24 Poker stake 44 Hastened 49 At ill time* 50 Weight of, ' Indl» (pL)l 52 Brythonic s*a god , 53 PronrAin

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