Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas on May 12, 1952 · Page 4
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May 12, 1952

Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas · Page 4

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4 NOMHWBT AIKANkAS TIMB. feyrttovIR* ArtoMM. Monday, May 17, 19.42 *nrtljm?8l Arkansac Otmocrill Publiihtd dtlly »cipl Sunday by FAYETTEVILLC DEMOCRAT PUBLISHING COMPANY Roberta Fulbrlghi. Prtiidtnl Founded Juni 14, 1110 Entered si Ihr pnst olficc Hi Fnyi'tteville. Ark., as Sr:onl Claw Mail Mmtci. Sim C. G«arharl, Viet PrM.-Gtneral Mnnigti Ted H. Wylil. Editor MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Associated Press is exclusively e n t i t l e d to the Use for r o p u b l t r a t i m i of all newr. disp.itrhr-.i credited to it or not otherwise creditcrl in inn. paper and also the local news published herein. All nghu of republu-ation of special dispatches herein are. also reserved. SUBSCRIPTION RATIS Per Vlitt . »e (by ctrrieri Met! '»H| In waihtnflnn. Btnton. IA»dl»'.n conn- t'.e Ark . and Artilr county. Okl«. Onf montli .. 7ic Thr«* rr.rnthB . s: fwi Etx monthi *" sn One ye'r »"'W Mall In cnuntlr» nther *h»n above: On* monlti . . . - S I M Six month! ...;.\"~""II""lI"";".'""""""*isi On* yrir . . . - tfnn All mall pnvah!« to »riv»nc» Membtr Audit Buriau of Circulation For thp Lord t a k e i h pleasure in his people: he will b c u u f i f y the mnek w i t h finlvatinn.--Psalms 149:4 Theory And Practice !RVf Gnmclfcst,-president f S t n r l i t i K Stores, Inc., which operates in Missouri, Arkansas. Mississippi and Tennessee, wns t h p principal speaker last Friilny n i t f h l at I h e a n n u a l hanquel. husiness men nf Arkansas (five for seniors in the f^ollejre of Business AHminisIration and the rolli'uo of EnRineerintr at. the University. Air. Griindfest made an inapirinif l a l k . Opportunities were never greater in America and in Arkansas, he told the f r r m l u n t i n i ; seniors. He referred to himself nn a (rrmltmle nf the College of Hard Knocks. He has (rained his hlfth place hi the business wnrlil through hard work, and he I r u l y sidled thf facts when he said "There is no snh- st.itute for hnrrt work." The ynunjf men and women who will leave the 1 ' n i v o r s i l y t h i s June to t a k e iojis all over t h i s country, will learn later, if t h e y don't know now, that t h i s is t r u e . Hard work w i l l pay off.. We also stated t h a t when, a ynuiiK man today inquires nf hrm if a job in his or- psniratinn may he open, the business man hardly has an o p p o r t u n i t y to say yes before thfl youngster is asking about, vacation)!..pensions nnrl w n»t rate of pay is offered. He told the ynunir people that they should be t h i n k i n g . "What can I contribute to t h i s man's business?" as well as considering what they are Roint? to tret out of it: : -' , Two young business executives H! t h d dinner session were heard talking 1o a Mnior who formerly worked fnr the organization With which these two are connected. He told them t h a t when h? was stock boy for their firm he learned n lot. about t h e business, "f even found out," he said good naturedly, "that you paid me 35 cents nn hour for my work when you could h a v e pard me fifl cents an hour." He went on to say it'was the savings from t h i s 35 c e n t s fn-Tiour that he used to finance his first year in cnllege. The theories t h a t Mr. O r u n d f e s t set forth were A No. One. nnri I hey have m u c h to merit their s t i i f l v and acceptance. R u t often the practice nf business does not follow the theories the business executive :·?( out. Mentioned above was a case where I h e organizatfon set out n rale of nay for a job which if thought was fair, nnri yet it hired a boy who was working his wav toward college and an education fur his l i f e work, and paid him far less t h a n the a m o u n t il could in all fairness have paid lii'm. ?m- ply because il was possible to do'so. His service was more t h a n acceutabie--tin- two men fold him .jusl Ihe o t h e r n i g h t l h a l ff he ever wanted \n work for their firm again, all he had to do was to apply. He is In another field entirely, however--and knowing w h a t he knows about it. you can't wonder. Thus Ihere is sonic e x p l a n a t i o n of why the y o u n g men and women g r a d u a t i n g from colleges and universities w a n t to know in advance what business is going to offer t h e m . It is conipletelv t r u e t h a t t h e r e Is no s u b s t i t u t e for hard work and t h a t the employe should di-sitv I n c o n t r i b u t e (,, the business--and probably does in m a n y cnsf»--but ft is likewise a fact that, too many times business gets the worker for what il can, r a t h e r t h a n for worker for w h a t it can, rather t h a n for w h a t the business considers he is w o r t h . Theory and practice don't always follow the sam' lines. The Skeptics THE WASHINGTON M erry-Go-Roitnd By DHEW PEARSON W.^huiH'''!! · WliiMi t h e n i n e b h c k - r n h c d ] i i t i i ' i ' s n f t i n - S u j j i r r n i 1 f ' r i i j i t H ^ M - m b l c t ' . r l n y , I h f v \ v i l l n(it I K ' J I I ;u KUtnenb: m e r e l y nn .''eixure nf Ihr- sled n t l l l r . They w i l l ;ib:o haw echoing in t h e b a c k ^ j o u n d nf t h e four! r h n m b r r I'i'l yr;n--; of ,'iigiliiieiit over the s.'irne v i t n l qllt.-Mion nf t h e p!e c .i'lenf'* pnwer siul whore do,; il stnp Thev w i l l hkewi'-e have a« pri-cf'itents ;it !e;M fnlli 1 ffi'ni'il Hepli|j|]Cfin c whn did p r e t t y much the s/in:e t h i n g a; Mr. Trurn;*n, iJrmncr.'it. I t ' * |in'.-;ihle H i n t t h e Supreme Court in:iy t r y In ilni-k t i n s h.v:ir i-xne. If .··(,, Ihi-y h;ive ;in -:,sv v.ay nut Tl.ey c;in c i t e t h e i r n w n n p i n j n n in If'.fj? w h e n (he slide nf M i s s i s s i p p i s o u g h t ;ni i i i j u n r l l n n jiK.'nnst PrfsHfMl A n d r e w .Inhn.snn In j i r e - ven! h i m f l ' i n i " l i - n m s h u r l i n g " Ml.°-slssi|)|)i's g ' i v ( T i n n e n t . .-Mid when t h e r n u i l ruled t h a t nn i i i l n t h;ts I h e power t n enjoin t h e president n f I h e C n j t f d Stiite*. Therefore, t h e Supreme Cnurl t n r h i y , c i t i n g t l i i ' , ri.uld f i n d I h i i i .Iiiiliic 1'ine h a d n o r i c h l to i n i n m S e e i e l . i i y ,,{ Cnmmeree Sawyer v. hn v.'i'S { " H i v i n g oul t i i e dneel o r f l e r s nf t h e j iflcr.'. This. I'-OUT-ver. would lint deeifle I h e f l i n r l . ' i - m e n l a l iM'ue nf I h e pre.'iidenl's power- -a d e h a ' e w h i r h liecan aliolll I h e l i m e I h e C n n ^ l i l l l l i n n v.-as w n l l e n nnd w h i e h h a s p i n h a l i l y f o u n d m n i e He- j i u h l i i all-; I h i i n Democrats n i i l i o l r l i n i ' , Ihe |, ( »wrr now claimed by Mr. T r u m a n . Here are s.mic of I h r i n . * * * I t e p u h l i c a n Nn. 1 |,i .;i,|e w i t h Mr. T i n m a n w a s none n t h e r t h a n t h e I n u n d e r o f Hie p a i t y . A l e x a n d e r H a m i l l n n H a m i l t o n v/enl s o f a r a s t o c l a i m l h a l t h e president o f I h e U n i t e d S t a t e s had j l i s l us (jrcnt power as thc k i n g nf K n j j l a n ' l w h e n he ruled the I.'! enloniev. A m ' i n g other things. I l l i i n i l l o n dei-l.ued t h a i . t h o u g h t i l l - C'nn- s l i l l l l i n n giver, (''Ingres* the. pnwer tn deelaie. war, the pn-sident also has the power to m a k e or declare war w i l h i i n l Ihe consent nf emigres-:. K e p u h l i c a i i Nn. 2 was President .John Adam-: w h n cnnducled a l l undeelared n a v a l \var w i l h r'rance in 1708. He even recalled Hcnr^e Wasii- i n g t n n f r n m r e l l r e m e n t al M n i m l Vrrnon to assume command of the A m e r i c a n armed forces in p r e p a r a t i o n f o r a f u l l - s c a l e m i l i t a r y o p e r a l i o n . AH tlii:: h e d i d w i t h n u l a n l h o i j / a t i o n !rnm a n d despite h j l l e r opposition from Cone;re.s.... I n e i d e t i l a l l y . Thmnas- . l e l f e r nn. f o u n d e r of H a r r y T r u m a n ' s p a r t y , dragM-i-d w i t h I l a m i l l o n anrl Adams. Hut l a l e r . nn hernmilXK pie:-id{nl. .lefferson f o l l o w e d t h e i r ideas by cnndiiclini; war on Ihe D a r h a r y pirates; President M a d i s o n l i k e wise ordered Gen. Andrew -laclonn In t a k e over F l n r i d n w i t h o u t any okav from Congn's-; * * + r e p u b l i c a n Nn. .1 In set i m p n r l a i i t precedents fnr H a r r y Tnirpnn was the man g e n e r a l l y cnn- sldered the foremost leader nf the R e p u b l i c a n p a r l y -- A b r a h a m Uncolii. It was Lincoln whn, w i t h n u l any -i,iig|-rs- sional permission, engineered the mnsl sweep- Ing jeir.ure of private property in all A m e r i c a n h i s t o r y -- I h e emancipation proclamation. There is no doubt, as far us a c t u a l I r r e a l i t y \ \ a s ( o n - eerned, t h a t the frtrins of hundreds of m i l l m n s of dollars worth o£ slaves was highly o u e . x t i m i a - hl«. Unuiln pushed the presidential power to j i s llmlls In other rcsp'e.cts. He act up m i l i t a r y commissions tn supersede the courts, stispen-lr-d Ihe writ of habeas corpus, and forcibly disbanded Ihe Maryland Legislature. Hepubllcan No. 4 who seemed tn ncree w i t h I'resident Truman was Teddy Honscveii. n vas Ted.ly's belief t h a t , regardless nf cnn E re«sinnal cnns-cnl. Ihe president was the "steward" of ihe n.ilinnal welfare, and empowered tn l a k e a n v action for the n a t i o n a l safely sn Innj; as t h e Cnnslltiitinn did nnt specify nthrnvisp. Thus "TR" sii?.pd Pannma w i t h o u t even in!im a t l n g to Congress what he wns up I,, .\ficr t a k i n g over the I s t h m u s he asked his a i i n m e - v general, Philander C. Knox. to w r i t e an ..pinion upholding the l e g a l i l y nf his a r l l n n . "Mr. President." replied Knox, "I sh..i;H prefer I h n t your action be without a single l a j n l of legality." In 19112. Teddy Monsevelt wns c o n f r o n t e d ,,. |U , a n a l i o n - w i d e a n t h r a c i t e slrikc. There v.as no war nn. and no emergency. However, Tedriv f e l l t h a i t h e strike threatened Ihe n a t i o n a l w e l f a r e and t h a i thc coal operalors, because of t h e i r a n t i - u n i o n i s m , were responsible. Sn Teddy sent word lo ,1. P. Moman ll,.,. if government proposals for s e t t l e m e n t u-eie not aecepted. he would order f e d e r a l troops to MM/,. and operate Ihe mines. maslers of l!i:.2, persuaded the co.il np,-ra't.iiVt,, y i e l d . Seuiiie was averled. Asirle from these d!siin^ni,.| l r ( | n . - p u i - i u , M V ; Ihe Snpieme Court w i l l d . i u b l l e . s e x a m i n e s,,',,,,. i n t c r e s t i n t precedents by n,-m..,-i als an-oiii- t h e m , A n d r e w . I n c k s o n wi,,, f|,,,,n.d ii,|, w ,n ,,| C'onuie.ss r e g a r d i n g Ihe H a n k of i!,,, r,,,,,.,: Stales, to say n o t h i n g of K r a n k l i n n R , , O M - V , - ! ! Several t i m e s liooscv.-l; oni ,| ,],,, ..,.,,,,,,; of ^tnl-.e-honnd p l a n t s not only d lt n,,, w ,,. bni HI lor lo w a r M"'t n n t a h l , - ca .,me si l l a l t ' n r when he si-i/cd II... \n p a l l i i / c r s c i i l i e d a s t r i k e in the f a l l nf 1940. FDR p r o m p t l y ordered t h e Army to t a k e over. A n o t h e r d r a s t i c seizure by Roosevelt was the i n t i - i n i n c n t of more t h a n inn.llllll West Coast . I : i p a n c " c - A i n e r i c i i n s in Ifl'iZ. Though most of I h e i n vcre A m e r i c a n born. Honsevolt rooted H i ' i n un from the West .Coast and pent them to i n i e n n e n t l a m p s i n I h e Hock.v M o u n t a i n states M u c h ol t!.eir properly w.v l e f l b"l;jnd. !!'· d i d t h i s w i t h o u t a n n.k. h o r n Congress. 11 11 ' !'.:er t h e Supreme f u i i i l voted to u p h o l d l i u n . T ) i ' - .:· arc t-ome nf t l . n ;!imr,s h , . n i n e j u s t i c e s w i l l h;;vc i:i l l - i ' i r j n ' n d s when ;hey li.-.ten t o ar- K i m i r n i s ,,,, n.,. .:(,.,.| ..,,.i /urn t o r l a y . This is also w h y i:n.-.-ied W i l l |)., v i : :. r m i n e i i ' p a t e n t all'ir- m y . r c n i a i h e i i at : , ,e.-cnt me.-ti n R n f thc Defense M - i h i l i r i i l l i i j ! C ' o m m i l t e r - : " t l ' s t l - r M:pn me C o u r t ' s job to save t h e Con- but it's the presulenl's job to save t h e wood-work in m i n i a t u r e and city b e a u t i f u l pots and boxes for flowers were attractive features. j Twenty Years Ago Today ; (Fayetteville Daily Democrat, May 12. lfl:)2) I About 300 women and several men attended the free conking school held at Lewis Brothers j t h i s a f t e r n o o n by Frank Decatur White of Tulsa, · Okla., m a s t e r conk, under j o i n t auspices of Lewis' i Bros. Company and the Arkansas Western Gas j company. Women brought note books along and made notes on the v a i i o u s recipes used. The I sponsors of the school said t h e y were well pleas, ed w i t h Ihe siy.e and q u a l i t y of the audience. j The Mastoden. ever bearing strawberry grown by S. A. B u r h a n a n is causing comment bv grow- i ers here. On m a n y nf the vines from 25 to 40 ! berries arc counted on each p l a n t . The beiry is not grown in s h i p p i n g ouantities, but is firm I and would be an excellent shiper, it is said. T h i r t y Tears ACII Tmla.v ( F n y r M e v i l i . . l . l a i i v Deiv.ocrnt. May 1?. 1P221 Some f i l i y rnc-mbers of t h e P e n n i r class nl the l l i c h Schniil a t t e n d e d a picnic civen by the class al Save,;- v e s i i . r c i - i y . Thc class made t h e t r i p in In:,-1-s i r n n u - d i . - i ' - l y a l l e r !V a n n u a l Cij.v D a y p r i i : j r a : i i :uid spei',! !hr day in s w . m n i i n R and I ' l i i i u . ; . The l u e u i l i e i " : o f I h . - . l u - j u r class also :·'.'! for a p i . - n i , - on W h i t e I t i v r r , a f t e r sell,ml had bet n ( l ! s i n i r ( - d f,,,- i;,e n a v . Ve-.lcr.iay n . ' l e r n n n n v.-as ,|ev.,l ( -d to ,1 d j , - -'''" "''- '-·"·Ue T - I P l l l b f - r - : nf . . . I I |;;-|r.ll)S V i V i t P d I h . - .-ehonls and a! each j e h o n l Uien- v:as a KCII- e;al pxpri'i..i,,n of s , i n , i i M . aiul appreciation of Ih.' .:,·..!.,- a n - l r.in:p!el|.ni».s of t h e work placed on e:,l.iln: I'.-,,.,.,- , - u l t i i , ; . dr.-iwing. heahh post- _eis. I'.'ilnre s t u d y , i i l e \MU I;, .specimens nf Ten Years Aeo Today (Northwest A r k a n s a s Times, M a v 12 1942) . The sale of n SI,noil bond placed H i l m a n Rrooks far into the lead in the Times carriers' war stamp and bond sales contest last week. A u x i l i a r y transmission lines nf the Arkansas Western Gas company at the West Fork of W h i t e river. Highway IH, were demolished Monday afternoon when two huge trees were blown across the suspension bridge. No one can complain about the Bulldogs past years record on the playing field. To start the season right, last fall the Purple and White t i d e rolled back all opponents on the gridiron except Harrison, a Thanksgiving nightmare, and Fort Smith, a much discussed tie up. Questions And Answers Q--What president popularized the slogan ' America First"? A--President Woodrow Wilson. Q--Who were Wycliffe's "poor priests"? A--A proup of his followers who set nut on foot to tell the people the message of the Bible Basil Willing B, Helen McCloy SMS* , T l i i : S 'I' " H V : ) · Un ill. ' \\ I i-.l loll. They'll Do It Every Time By Jimmy Hallo ''/WH£N IT V/AS HER TURf-T^ ,M TD H4VE TWE /V.EETIrJG / ,, _! AT HR^ f^OUSE, THE \ / ' - / R;m Ff? u/ds fitrw rc» \/ K41Y DiD.sl'T WAT THOSE Jx WARDEN.' · I BUTLER WAS S'CK OR V IVMY r?iD, J/ AMN X 1 OR CO.-J'T TUEV \ I /4LLOVV KIDS OFF -TDCHy-AtiO H A QUESDOtJ A 84^-SITTER of? v JUST F^V MO ATTEH-nQj ITS LIKE TRYING TO PLAY CARC® LIKE TD SIT FOS THE.M , TO PUT UP WITH 0-ME IVHO BROUGHT LITTLE DC/IRS TO 8Ricoc-au8 TftWK MB 4 vUT TIP 1C n c h l i n u l l l n » i ' « ( I n - i i n | i n s i « r . hi| i r i - « r n r l j fltuK h l m t r l f r n l i n l H n l l n h n i m r » ( M - I I - he ·.crnm to Itr r t [ i r i - i c l . V t i l t n i ! i \ « m n n « t r n k * t n l l n x l l IN r i T i . K n l r c t l by mio nf I h f K » r * t « . H f i M i i n i u n d -VorU.-. A i l l t i k l l mill Mr.. York*- n r r i N l k i t i u . II t i n i h r i M i t l r r uf t l t r tidM. D r . '/Ilium r n t i i i m i m - c * Itir n r r l v n l ot ··llni,ll UHlliii;." O A S I I . WH.MN'C'S l l r ! iinptilso wiis tn look nt K : i t h r i i r . r Sh;iw. Her ryrs st«ouiol In sink m i n e i n t o t l i o i f d a r k M t c k r i s ruul ' t h e n 1 \v;i; : n Wnr sliatiow arn-.ind her m o n t h . Dr. /iimniT w.'i^ .npl»rn;i.-]nilf* t h " l i l l l n m a n . "Is it r r n l l y Dr. i l l i n g nt liisl 1 . 1 " "Vr-;. ye*'" Mr vv.-i*; ;ilnmt jxmt- injj. "Sni-ry I'm so l.itr. 1 h:td nn .·iwi'ul t m i r c r l t i n H a t a \ i i»n Third A v r t n i r . Tl.on \vo wore held up by n irafllr MorU." "Iinti't d i s t i c s ^ v ( » u i i - i ' i r . " 7tm- mfr's cliincc flii-kci-pd it; H.'isil'sdi- r i ' i - t i i - n .is ho l a s i l n k i n d l y hand nn t h e h i i l o mini's shmildcr. "I'm M i i f - it v.';is not ymir f ; n i l t . " It i-.nnc i o 15,".il. u i t h i r n n y . ilial 7mi:r«T m i K t brhi-\v I h i y. l i l t l r ni:m tin- n-.-il l r . W i l l i n g . M N C P hr h.id bi'i'ti niiiinuiH-cd in t h e usnnl u ;.y. H a ^ i ! li I in . s e l f . \vhn h n d d in n n n t i y i i H u i ^ l y . w i u i h l be ;a';ni f ' T t h e i n i p w t i t r if lie pni- c l ; n i t H H l h i n i M - l f a.s "Has.il Wr.lmjj" now. S i i i i H ' I l i i n i : rl.tth'M-d on t i n - · ( h s t o n e. MIVJ Sliaw had ^d lici u o r y - l h i i i d l e d r.inc. /,iminor \ a.-; tlic l i r t to rt»arh her sidi s , leaving the l i t l l o ni.in - - l i a n d o i l alnno In the middle of thft rnnm. "My dfar Ml;--: Shaw!" Zlmmrr picked up Ihr ranr by its handle, t h r u shifted his firip to Iho cane it.vlf 0,1 lie 5lld the bundle Into her crnsp. "Thnnk yon, Ur, X.innner." Hor t Irs*: pnulw wnvrrptl. 195! tr Hctrn McCloy Drei«r, printed tfcroiifl ptnnftiwn *f Hit publitKti, idom House, Inc. Distributed by HEA Service, Inc. A low laugh c.ime from Rosamund Yorke. HIM pyfs dnnrpd impishly. "What n rielirious sit- i i n l i f i i ! I'm p n i n f i to have one realty amusing evening." "I'm clod you t h i n k it amusinc." "Don't you?" A p n i n that rip- p l i n g linii^h. "I h.ijipon to know ynu'ic ihe real Dr. Willing because I iiu'1 vcu through your brother, l\ui]. u hum 1 know \ve!l. But poor IV. X i miner can't have any idea w h i c h m v of you is thp impostor. Pin simply ( t y i n ^ to know more n l i n u i the l i t t l e man, alins Ilasil W i l l i n g . How did you holh happen In come here the same evening?" "I followed him," explained B:isil. "KwaiiFe I rhaneed to overhear him usinfi my name as his own. I've no iilva why he did." "Then this is a s n °d chance to find out. He's coming this way, looking rather like nn albino rabbit bolting from a hound. Is it Dr. 7,immer he's escaping? Or Miss Slnw?" Otto presented a service trny with two glasses. Rosamund took Ihe nearest, n pale rose rnlor. Basil shook his head. "No, t h a n k you." 'I'MIE l i t l l o man drew near, n · crimson Klass in his h a n d . Hosa- muiul Hashed him a b r i l l i a n t smilr. "Dr. Willing!" She t-ried w i t h Imr- r-(\\]f c o r d i a l i t y . "Whnt a great pleasure! 1 thoiiRht you wore still overscvis." The false Willing took n little t u n e to si't his ghis down precisely a nciiiby lahle. "I got buck ( | U i t ( Tecently." J.i;tmund shifted her l i n e of n l l f i c k , "I've Always w a n t e d n rhance to discuss the Heisonberg viirtHtion with you." "The -- nh -- Helsenherg variation?" The l i t t l e man looked as if he would like to strangle Rfwft- nvinrt. "U-- well- it hardly #«im quito the moment to discuss n t h i n g like that, dor* i t ? " He lookel dcsnrrnlely nt n n s 11. "I never discuss psychiatry with a layman. Waste of time." Rosamund's lips curled on the edge of a smile. "I've heard the Ueisenberg variation shouldn't be mentioned in the p r e s e n c e of Indies. But I'm no Isdy and this man is a psychiatrist." The little man was studying Basil. "You're a psychiatrist' I don't believe I know your name." "Don't you? Jt's Basil Willing." The l i t t l e man stood quite still, eyes blank with shock. Then, with a motion involuntary as a reflex, he lifted his glass and drained it. "I suppose you're joking." "No, I'm not joking." Basil turned to Rosamund, "Mrs. Yorke will vouch for me." Rosamund was savoring this new twist. "Dr. Willing and I happen to be old friends." "Then ..." The little man looked wildly around the room. "Everyone here knows?" · · · rASIIi shook his head. "Only Mrs. Yorke and myself. I entered thc room unannounced." The little man's eyes were still on Basil. "1 was afraid something like this might happen." 'I snw you in a tobacconist's on Third Avenue about 30 minutes ago. t)id you know t h a t you were w i t h i n n few blocks of my home there?" 'Of course. That's why I was therr. And I suppose you rnm« out of the shop while I was hailing a cub and heard me tell the driver I WM Radl Willing." 'Kxactly. And now I shall have to tell Dr. 7,lmmer that you are nn impostor." The little man looked back over his shoulder. There wfti nn one behind him. "Dr. Willing, plfaft let me talk to you privately. Then, If you fttlll want to brand me publicly as a faker, I won't protest. Is that too much to a*k? H T» BY JOSEPH AND RTEWART ALSOP Washington - Behind the new j munist side, underlining their con- crisis in Korea, there is a tra=;i- · fidrnce in the outcom*. On our romic story. A f t e r months of hope- ' side, v.-e did everything we could less heckling, our negotiators were , to j u s t i f y this confidence. We at last convinced--and w i t h good ' gave the widest publicity to the reason--that the Communist- jren- i Communist assurances that all re- uinely wanted to end the f i g h t i n g t u r n i n g prisoners would be treat- in K o r e a . Every o u t s t a n d i n g ; rd like the prodigal son. And w e disagreement had al least been j just about asked the prisoners, compromised, and then the Com- ' "You do want t o t g o home, don't munist prisoners in our hands in I y o u ? " effect rejected the cnmprnnusp bv ' The results, again ironically, an overwhelming vote. horrified the American policy- A month or so ago, when Ihere.' m a k e r s as " llicn as il enraged the wore such high hopes, (here w e r e ' Communists. A large majority of only three disputed points o n t h e ' t h p t o t a l prisoners including agenda. These were the supervi- i three-quarters of the 20,000-odd . sion of t h e armistice, the construe- ' Chinese in our hands, chose to ion of additional airfields in North ! sfn - v u ' ilh U5 - The resu! t was a sit- Korea and the return of prison-1 u n t l o n where face-saving and jugs. j gling wpre no longer possible. With li.nrd-ho.idpd realism n u r ' The Interesting aspect of thi., policy-maker., concluded t h a t it i «r- h t t l e stnry ,s very s.mply a *d not matlor murh whether Po-I c "' ar proof of '"« Communist de- and or the Soviet Union super- | f' r e to """ h e Korean ''8 ht ' n 8 iseri the armistice TM the Commu- I , a n , md '. Th , ey were P 0 , ' h e y nist side. They also concluded that i f i m n s ! ' er ' al " ly are , " Ot - wi »' n 8 it did not m a t t e r much whether I '" end the f '* Mm * at 'i 1 ' ex P ensB the Communists promised to b u i l d of an '"» rmous lossI ,°f *»«. any no more North Korean a i r f i e l d s , ' TM' e l h a n we ar , e W .'" in 8 to d " 50 at the expense of using more than since the.v would cheat if they could get away w i t h it. Hence, 100,000 men in our hands for hu- they decided to offer the com ; J , man sacrifice-- which is what forcible repatriation would amount promise disclosed bv President i , -, . . , . ,. . . , Truman, Ignoring the a i r f i e l d s is- : ta Bul an c " d °. f thc ''I 1 "' 1 !* was sue, letting the Communists s a v e 1 unquestionably desired by the en- face nn their n o m i n a t i o n of Russia ! emy ' as by m ' as an armistice supervisor, a n d 1 insisting onlv t h a t no prisoners! would be forcibly repatriated ' As these words are written, the American policy-makers are un. . . . ! certain o f t h e outcome, b u t dimtv Almost immediately, On. Nam hope ai!ainst hope that worW , . II and the Communist negotiators , o p i n i o n w i l l per suade Peking and indicated t h a t t h i s "package t h e K r e m l i n ,,, accepl a h e a v , ,,,,, deal woulrt probahly be satis-!,,, r are after all. Our allies, par- factory to them. Even in the m a t - i licu | ar ]y the British, ate optimis- ter of the pnsoners. which t h e y ' lica ,, v sug(te stin r "rescreeninE" had pressed most violently. t h c y ! l h e priso n er s, on The theory that receded from their former posi- | ne prohlcm m a v t n u s be brousht t.on By an elaborate system of w i t h l n mana^abi,, bounds. Yet jusghng. the Communists were t o i tncy suppor t us on t h e basic prin- rrtam some South Koreans, w h i l e ! cjp f es . We rio not intf , n( , to H ,., ke we were to retam the Chinese and j (,,,, i n i, i a , i v p in m r i i n g 1he ha)? . N o r t h Korean captives who chose ] j, l i n s , Panrn , m1orn , since we our s.de^ Previously the Commu- j h a v e nn c!car idea what to do j f msts had demanded t h a t all p r i s - i t n e , ruce ta , k , break a^,,. And oners must be exchanged., at K u n - ( h e odds are uoled at about ,,,.,,. pouil :f need be. to . one a((ainst the otner sida At I h i s point, ironically e n o u g h , : breaking off the truce talks and both the American anr! Commu: resuming the offensive, nist negotiators thought t h a t t h e ! Thus the chances are that the proportion of prisoners wishing to i whole uely, costly, dreary business stay with us would be relatively w i l l simply drag on, at least un- fma ^'- i til a new American president has · . been elected. Yet the inherent We have 17(1,tl'OO prisoners, of danger of the situation must not. which ]:i2.m« are uniformed com- t he forgotten. The Communists now batants. Out of the 132.000 ro:n- have a million troops and an air hstants, our people and their j force of 2,000 planes ready for ac- Communist opposite numbers both '· tion in Korea; and while building thought only ,-i few thousand Chi- ' up all stockages, they have also ' nese and North Koreans would refuse to go home- -the f i g u r e of 2.- accumulated powerful armored forces and reserves of artillery. 500 was officially quoled in Wash- i They probably will stay behind inglon. But our negotiators were convinced l h a t if we could return even as many as 110.000 combat- nt prisoners ( t h u s retaining 22,- their fortified lines, but they may attack. If they do to, the war will hardly be possible to localize any onger. When you have got to 000), all could, somehow be ar- I skate nn thin Ice. it is well to re- ranged. The suggestion for screening t h e prisoners emanated from the Corn- member that this seemingly solid substance can crack and dissolve Dear Miss Dix: My problem is not unusual, I guess, but I am .10 and at t h a t age I can't afford to make a fool of myself. I have been known as a m a n - h a t e r ; I'm really not, but I just haven't met the l i g h t one. My girl friend's husband is on a bowling team, and on Friday nisht we pick him and some other men up and drive them home, usually stopping for a snack. One man is a bachelor who seems to like me. I like him, ton. We are both shy. When the rest of the boys found nut he liked me, they teased h i m a lot, going sn far as to send silly letters to his office. I'm a f r a i d if I ever had a chance with h i m . these friends have r u i n ed it. They have me so upset that I decided not to meet t h e m a f t e r bowling, but when Friday night comes along I find myself dress- in an instant. ing up to look as nice aj possible and tagging along. I can't tell my parents about it, for a f t e r being level-headed for so long they'd t h i n k I was completely foolish. I can't understand how I ever got a crush at my age. Faye M. Answer: You are being very un- f a i r to yourself, Faye. You make 30 sound like senile old age. In the first place, there is absolutely no age l i m i t to romance, and in the second place 30 is much too young for you to feel beyond the pale of sentiment. You're a personable, normal young woman with a perfectly normal feeling for a nice young man. Your so-called friends, however, are behaving in an obnoxiously childish fashion. If they possessed one ounce of understanding they'd do their best to smooth your path CONTINUED ON PAGE FIVE Baby Talk HORIZONTAL I Baby's dress protector Tenth of a cent ' 8 Where baby sleeps 12 Fruit drink 13 Notion 14 Em-.nation · I S Wager 16 One sent on errands 18 Values 20 Outmoded 21 Measures of type 22 Wicked 24 Btble. need loving 26 Man's name 21 Cut, as grass 50 Straightened '32 Disposition .14 Repaired 35 Click beetle 36 Baby i Margaret'i | nlcknam* 1 37 Frees I 39 Container 40 Row . 41 Holt , 42 Put in a warehouK t « Self-centered i' person 1 4H Fabrics 51 Pronoun 52 City In , I P«nn«ylvanlt S.1Indlin ! M Bom SSWwn.n VERTICAL 1 What baby is often called 2 Roman date 3 Improving 4 Actors 5 The same as before- 6 Smaller 7 Spanish article 8 Artificial waterway 9 Floor covers 10 Angers 11 Uncovered 17 Heroic 19 Improve 23 Twining plants 24 Temporary lodging 25 Toward the sheltered side 26 Baby Edward's nickname 27 Changes 28 Mineral rocks 29 Existed .11 Weirder 33 Unspoken 38 Drab 40 Woody plantj 41 Postures 42 Small duck . 43 Ancient Irish; capital 4 4 O f the ear' .' 46 Mirth 47 Fatty animal^ titsue ' 4f Thre« ol cardJ 50 C h i l l . ^ M Or|»ni of r

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