Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas on May 2, 1952 · Page 3
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version
May 2, 1952

Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas · Page 3

Publication:
Location:
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Friday, May 2, 1952
Page:
Page 3
Cancel
Start Free Trial

Page 3 article text (OCR)

you Taste-a-SHAKEf ·* Tastemark I wish to thank the citizens of Washington County for giving me your support and confidence. This : will enable me to devote my undivid- ' ed time to the duties of the sheriff's office. Thanking you again, sincerely, MR. AND MRS. BRUCE CRIDER Political Adreriiifment Paid For by Bruct Crider, Far»M«Till«, Ark. G 41.'I.-CENTER . PHONE 21 OPEN SATURDAY UNTIL 8 P.M. OUR USUAL 59e PLISSE cMt 39?* .35-36' Width . p.rmonenlly-crinkled cotton thct re- quire..littltfor no Ironin 8 . Vivid sport prin(5 and d«p- ton. tollds for ,kirt,, ho us «oo t! , men', shim, b.ach log,. Waihfa.1. Take; odvantag, of .(hi, r lqv tf g . ·: Court Pica ·nd · jtliut HlUer . before 1M». Bunch* uyt It "five the freen i(ht to further «nrwsion," "The United Ni.tions ,l» first and ioremoat i peace organin- lion, but when there is an act of ·ggreuion it can't stop by peaceful efforts, it is wlllinf to fesoti !o international force." The U.N. must act as a brldfe to close the gap between conflicting parts of the world, to negotiate and attempt an honest compromise, thn sneaker contended. ONCI KNOWN as : Hitler'j favorite' film actress, 1 Lenl Riefenstahl, 45, is shown as she appeared before a denazification court in West Berlin; She stated that she sought the dictator's acquaintance, in 1932 because she saw in him » rising political figure, but added, however, thai their relations were artistic rather than political. The BerU*j court; confirmed the find- Ings of i West German court which had earlier classified her a l "follower' 1 of the Nail Party. KOREAN TRAGEDY-CONTINUED FROM PAGE O!«» vlien Russian 1 troops . refused to leave Iran and were ordered out by the U. N.; the wars in Greece, Indonesia, Palestine, and India- Pakistan; and the Berlin crisis in 1948 which caused the famous" airlift. "Any one of these could have exploded the world," He s^id. Bunche recalled that the first Russian walk-out of the U. N. occurred "when Soviet troops were ordered out of Iran. Since then the Russian walk-outs have been frequent--but Bunche reminded that they always come back into the U. N. meetings, because they have learned that "no single nation is bigger than the collectivity of nations." The U.N. possesses the will and courage which the League of Na tions lacked, Dr. Bunche said. It has dared 'to act against aggression "The League may have failed," he said, . "because it could not muster the'strength to'.stand up against aggression."'When it failed to act against Japan in Manchuria', against Italy in Ethiopia, Some people and organizations "stack the deck".against the U.N. In criticizing it. Bunche claimed. His most pointed remark was directed at the Daughters of the American Revolution, who took a "negative attitude" to the U.N. in » meeting in Washington. Bunche noted that the EAR has not always heen the most progressive of groups, and added:." . "If some of those., dear: ladies (of the DAH) had been aliVe at the time of the American ReVbluS" tion, I think they would have been against it." . ; Bunche's speech was. delivered In a calm, quiet manner. He avoidr cd direct references tov:Soyiet v Russia, since he was spealiinijfviifi an. official of the Unltei'Niiitipns.' .Near the end of the 70-minute talk, however, Bunche : concluded his remarks on the U.N. and spoke as an American--on,.a topic which shares, the importance of the U.N. with him--on the Negro problem' in the'United States. Kmphasizing that the United States/needs friends in theworld, Bunche warned that. American treatment of the Negro has'.hurt the U.S. in the eyes of foreigners. "Our contradictions,", he said, "have cost us-prestige, goodwill, and lives . . ." He a'ssertfd-. ..the U.S. must-put its interracial;heute in order and "show the world that democracy is our actual way of life, applicable.to all peoples regardless of race, color or creed." "We need to demonstrate that democracy is color-blind . . . Outmoded myths and legends must be abandoned . .. This requires no revolution in so'ciety except a psychological revolution." Democracy is being challenged and America's role for peace is to practice democracy, he declared. "We can't have two brands of democracy--a pure democracy for export and a second quality for home consumption." Bunche admitted that he cannot speak for all American Negroes, but he stated: "1 believe all the ' American Negro asks is that he be treated like any other citizen . . . as an individual on the basis of whatever merit he may command . . . equality of treatment and nothing more." Bunche spoke under auspices of the U.A. Distinguished Lectures Committee. Earlier in the day he had been honored at a luncheon in the Student Union. He spent the night }n Fayetteville and w».s to go to Albuquerque, N. · M., today for a speaking engagement. - Commercial production of-barbed wire started in 1874. Automatic WASHERS Specially Priced! (REG. 199") Now Low As WITHOUT SUDS-SAVK tt.OO few*, 11.00 miiiHilr MI Stm Iny Ttrni . (liluil cirryinj ehirft) · Inchicfos normal installation · DURALITE AGITATOR washes clean. Can't rust, corrode or develop sharp edqes! · WATER DEPTH can be adjust.d to fit large and small wash loads ... saves water, soap! · FLEXIBLE CYCLE lets you shorten, lengthen, stop or repeat any washing operation Kenmore automatically washes, rinses seven times, spins laundry damp dry, shuts itself off ... Your hands never touch water I Yet you pay no more--BUT LESS--for KENMORE. No wonder it's America's fastest selling automatic washer! See it today. MOM SUDS SAVER, REG, 199.95, NOW 180.00 "sSgS!^ 1 l r o n i « « ; , int .{ree » \ Clothe* »ry I minute*- ., ^aai Ktnmcn CMix Drytr . K«nm*ra Automatic W«iHtr FAYITTEVILLE, ARK. 20 E. CENTER PHONE 1127 Obituary Roferi-(Sp«cial)-The body of he Rev, James Ame« honeyeutt, 88, was urit to hli home at Shamrock; Texas. Thunday night by the'CalliB.on-Porter Funeral Home. Mr. Hon-ycutt, retired minliter of the Church o* Christ, came to P. of- ers a week ago to visit his daughter, Mrj. Ralph F, Reed. He died unexpectedly following, a heart it- tack. . ' Funeral service and burial will he at Shamrock.' . Survivors are hli - daughter; three «ons, Andrew of Dozler, Texas, Amos of Shamrock, Texas, and Floyd of San Antonio, Texas. Ernnt E. Wood st J8.. . . . , , terday -in -North -Little HockrVet- erans Hospital.- He was born May 26, 1927, in Fayetteville, the ion of Mr. and Mrs. Ervin Wood. He served 10 months in the Navy and two years in the Army during W«rld War It. He Is survived by his parents; three brothers, Raymond, Charles, and David, air of Fayetteville; and five sisters. Miss Doris .Wood of Corpus Christ!, Texas, Peggy, Margaret, .Carolyn and Linda, all of Fayetteville. Funeral arrangements under direction of the Watson Mortuary are incomplete. Samuel Conrad Swtarlngcn Samuel Conrad Swearingen, 71, for 30 years a Little Hock public school instructor, died at-his home here this morning. 'For the last five years he has been an employe of the University General Extension Service. He was a native of Lee Crt«k in Crawford Count* | Mton Mountain GfOUp He it survived by hli wife. Mre. I r - · - r Mary McGraw of Fayetteville; two daughters, Mn. George N. Plan May 6 Meeting The Boston Mountain Hesort Brandei* Untrenrty'i elected co-eptalni for Ox football and basketball team* are, tor Cade, Jr., of Alexandria, Va., and I Association will meet Tuesday, their , each case, the imallctt player! '«· ; Miss Lenora Swearingen of Oak Ridge, Tenn., and one son, U. Col, Sam Swearingen with the Army In .Germany; three brothers, Brown Swearingen of Lee Creek, Chester Swearingen of Lee Creek, and Wallace Swearingen of California; one half-sister, Mrs. Robert McDowell of California, Funeral arrangements under fhe direction of the Watson Mortuary are incomplete. · Vubmaf, Patualai. Starlit ·Bt and Mini Oihtr Flow- Ming. Plants ·Tomato, Ptppn and EM Plants · Summer Bloomini Bulbs and Flower S«di A D A M S FLOWER SHOP PIMM IM It M. Bl«k WANTED POKE GREENS Will luy Storting Sunday, May 4th Crow Canning Co. OM Litferal Plant To the Voters of WiskingfM County: I with to cxprow my oppr»tloti»n *n b«lnf an untpimtd candidate In the Democratic Primarta. I want to IM and visit with w many of you ai tpper- (unity permits, just In* tarn* at if I had an ·ppmcnl. Sinartly, PAUL C. DAVIS, Candidate for Ceuntr Cl.rk Politics! AdTerUmtnl Paid Far ky Paul C. Davit, . Far«H«TUl«, Ark. May fl, for the annual election of officers. The meeting will he! ,. r ° r - t h * ' mh «tt»l«h« Wf the! u ij i 4t i.r, i t- i. i .! »tatc of Ohio rank* »i the nation'* held «l thi Window School and r lading producer vf.bunen Is (cheduled to begin at 8 p.m. The Association Is rf.rrcntjy conducting a drive to increase lift membership.. 8 horses. · ' · . ' · . ·" An outiundini flinr--Jtuiftff Roman MnrBread.- 11-1MJ Can Do It Better!.' n WIIDS . . . cud t. ll.it, t0ugh«f Thorou9fily cU«m up i.di, hightlt pitetiti, vicirtt loll, ·crtiftt, fenct rowt, orehirdi. HUSH . . . actually elt.ri itivy bruth, vinei, tunMe, undtrgrawth end imd!i troi. Clcin cut- idaati «nii durf buthti undir ind.bttwtin hedgci, Mof-AU h tlwtyi r«df lot frlmninf ftnct rewt «nd keeping them trlmmtdi · LAWNS ... ill In ill your belt bet It Moi-AIl for.wiN M liwni and' ·ertitei. K«tpi !«;·]* yirdi In TRIM. Cutt tiwn : mewln« lime eno tfforf fo e minimum. Trantferm * tfrtiom* tut IM. hiclnitinf hobby. MAKE UWN MOWING FUN MulckH tan* ' Inta Vilwkto ' In*. s For full details and demonstration *·· U T T L 6 ' E S S O S T A T I O N Corner Wett Mountain School St. Phono 12 POWER Lawn MOWERS FOR RENT OR SALE ^ A SIZE FOR ANY LAWN First in fayetteville \ ' Cotton Skirt Special Specially Purchased for You! $5.98-$7.98 Values Beautiful, sanforized printed cottons in circular and flared styles. Sizes 10 to 16. mwmm^ *.«'..vf;^.u,K .-· Cotton Slip Special 1 $|98 Reg. $2.98 Value Fully cut cotton slips with eyelet trim at top and hem. Sizes 32.to;44 in white only. Matching Half Slip $1.7?

Get full access with a Free Trial

Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page