Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas on January 4, 1952 · Page 3
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January 4, 1952

Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Fayetteville, Arkansas
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Friday, January 4, 1952
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NOHTHWfST ARKANSAS flMIS, fayttttvilb, AitMM, Friday, Jomnry 4, Ifn Symington Will Leave RFC Wishington-yPJ-Stuart Syming-* tun, an ace pinch-hitter for the Truman administration for six years, will bow out in a few weeks a.i head of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, probably taking Washin6ton .(yp)-T h o r e was a sizable slice of top RFC officials! complctc administration clam-up Officials Mum On Future 01 J. Howard McGralh with him. President Truman reported yesterday he expects to accept y resignation from Symington later to return to private business. 1 today on the future of Atty. Gen. ' J. Howard McGrath, a wheel-horse in the Truman cabinet for the last two years. A fair assumption based on developments yesterday is that nothing has been decided despite growing criticism that he lias not been vigorous enough in cracking down on irregularities in his department, The attorney general refused to talk with reporters. Through a secretary, he sent out a repeated 'no comment" all day yesterday on a fresh f l u r r y of unconfirmed reports that hn may shortly leave government service. President Truman declined to answer any question on McGrath's status. Both actions were in sharp contrast to the prompt and emphatic denials made by both Mr. Truman .and McGrath as recently as three weeks ago that the attorney general might resign. Statement Expected The resignation reports, then and now, stem from congressional investigations into alleged federal income tax frauds, reputed attempts to influence government officials in pending cases, and the W. Stuart Symington indications are that resignations also will' bo forthcoming f r o m , a number cf key officials installed by Symington in the RFC to help him with a sweeping cleanup job. Symington and his houst'clean- Ing crew took over last May after a Senate subcommittee charged the RFC with yielding to a political influence ring with White House contacts. Symington was out of town ami not available for comment on Mr. Truman's announcement, but his close associates said the abruptness of it took them by surprise. Symington said only recently he wanted to leave the government, but had lots of u n f i n i s h e d problems lo settle at the HFC first. Denies I'olieies Involved Mr. Truman said RFC policies HEAD STUFFY DUE TO COLDS ** TAKE^ {,,!,,, /» £ f* symptomstic ODD RELIEF were not involved in the resignation. Symington has been at odds some State De- however, partment officials over deadlocked negotiations with Bolivia on new tin prices. James Allen, a special assistant to Symington, said today he cx- pccls to resign shortly. Peter I. Bukowski, Chicago banker who has been No. 2 man in the agency, stepped put over the weekend. Solis ITorwitz, RFC general counsel, said he hadn't made specific plans, but indicated he might leave soon. A quintet of other lop assistants may leave along with their boss, or shortly afterward, officials saifl. These officials, all with" the title of special assistants to Symington, include Edward C. Welsh, economist; Don Burrows, controller; Spencer Shannon, materials expert; Ramsay Potts, military expert; and Dabney Pcnick, investment advisor. Shannon said he had no definite plans yet. When he moved into the RFC, Symington ordered a series of policy changes. All loans were made public, a drastic change from the past secrecy. Companies seeking RFC loans had to list their representatives dealing with the agency and had to report any fees involved. Regional RFC offices were stripped of power to approve loans. criticism of the political opposition that McGrath has not been sufficiently firm in dealing with the situation. H is believed the president shortly will make a formal statement on McGrath, butmas not decided what that statement will say. Some hard choices are involved: The president finds on one hand a group of strident Republicans clamoring at the start of a presidential campaign year for a scalp somewhat bigger than that of Assistant Atty. Gen. T. Lamar Caudle fired by the president November 16 for "outside activities" while heading the Justice Department's tax division. On the other hand, McGrath Is the president's long-time trusted friend not personally accused of any irregularity and generally credited with doing as much as any one man in getting Mr. Truman elected in 1948. McGrath at the time was chairman of the Democratic National Committee. In these circumstances many find it difficult to believe a presidential dismissal possible. Choicei For McGralh McGrath also is confronted with hard choices: His loyalty to the president and to his party is ingrained. A voluntary step-down in favor of another appointee as attorney general might assist the president but it would be hard to take after more than 21 years of distinguished public service and the possibility of even higher office. It has long been a generally accepted fact here that McGrath would be given the next vacancy on the Supreme Court. One strong point in his favor here is the fact that he is a leading layman of the Catholic Church which now has no member on the Supreme Court for the first lime in 55 years. The recent flurry of McGrath reports also have included forecasts that he might become an ambassador. Women Interviewed For Government Positions Miss Virginia Keegan, "Navy civilian representative, is located at the Navy recruiting station, Postoffice Building, and is Interviewing women who may desire to become typists or stenographers i tori Jury To Hear Husband-Killing Story Joncsboro, Ark.-(^'/-Tlie c a s e of Mrs. Claude Arndcr, tho Cash. Ark., mother of nine who is charged with first decree murder the shooting of her husband, is to be presented to the Ciaiti- head County Grand J u r y in April, Deputy Prosecutor H i l l Pcni.x said today. Mrs. A ruder, who reported her husband beat j her nnd the children regularly, is free on bond. Penix said the first degree m u r der charge filed against the A r n - ders' oldest son, Claud Junior, was "a technicality" and that the boy probably never would be tried. The deputy prosecutor crplainrd that the boy was charged because Am- Walks on New Legs, for the government. Applicants need to have the ability to type at least 40 words a minute and take dictation at 80 words a minute (stenographers only) to pass special Civil Service tests. The minimum age is 18 years. Positions carry Civil Service ratings with salaries beginning at $2,950 per annum for typists and beginning stenographers and $3,175 for experienced stenographers. The most troublesome kind of jellyfish, having tenacles and stingers, is the shimmering moon- jelly or aurelia aurita, which np- pears from the shores of Nova Scotia southward. History's first mention of a settlement on ' the site of Madrid in Spain is found in the Arab rccj ords which refer to a 10th century Moorish fort called 'Madjrit, source of the Spanish name. he said he reloaded the rifle mother said she used to kill Ar dcr early Wednesday. The sun also is free on bond Chick Placements Decrease In Area Hatcheries and dealers pla 1,139.000 broiler chicks w i t h p ducers in Northwest A r k a n during the week ended Deccm 29, according to the A r k a n Crop Reporting Service. This a decrease of one per cent fr the previous week. Of the total placements, 739, chicks' were hatched ' in the a ami 400,000 came from ot states. Eggs set during the w were down one per cent from I.-revious week. The Duke of York opci Australia's first Parliament, IV y, 1901. M. . Ov.Tstrcci. and family t h e i r - h e . . . - - New Yc;.'» ' U'tP.'.ls In the home o.' Mr. a n d ; ' Mrs. U.illfis S.nith of i Sticct Urn week was · M/Si'l. M a r v i n , v.hn \v : from Killin Field, Flu., ! in C a l i f o r n i a . SITKC.LI.I .Vmlh i.s '· ;.M a i r p l a n e rm'cliamr. ! J n n n i y Haim'r, j;in:dl smi of Dr. - n i x l Air;:, (icfirce MarniT of Way- · I,'imi Avenue, u n d e r w e n t a tnn- . MllCTlomy in a local ,|uct:jr'K » f - ; M r , r o v : lia- c-arlv t h i s week. He N r u - L _ uu iind Ir.'t Day. Mr. and Mrs. WI1II*" Leslie of West K n r i i MonMtcllo and Ptc. K«rin'«th l,«- t h r i r sen.! H C * v; * lj ' 3 s'.stioned wilh-fhe .'"as en r o u t e ' r i n p Corps at Camp '.Fendleton, to a hasp : C.-ilif,, recer tly visited with t' r .Vmth i.s: mother, Mrs. Josephine Leslie, a n ! , their sister and Jl cr family, Mr. jnd M:.;. C l i f i o i Si-.cn and L. ' M, .-·rid their brnlhirj: and f.i.iiilicji, Mr. ;u»l Mrs. Dick Leslie. ?·*.. and Mrs. Kurtcnc Leslie and Xi, and '!e. and child NJ.. walks oul of Ihe llojibronrk i ported tu Lc rofdvciini.' v;ell. I Miss Vi-nui Drart. tc'-chn in UK? · L u t h c i a n l;i!idorn:':' :. v i l l \m in ; r h u r c o of the .n:(i\ itics ill iho C'hiliirrn's Slory H'irr .jaiurday m f t r n i n ' ! ;it it) o V ' n - k In Ihc ;' S[irln.';H;ilf P. bile Lihra;y ' e i I H . . .s li.id Ijcon d i s f o n t l u u c d : t l : : . . ;:'i t h e ' n l i d a y s . Al. r:. '''"'' i f r n m i x v U'nni^h l'J arc I'cdiaHy i n v i l r d to fitlrtid. Mr. ;iinl Mrs. liobprt l".:r- ·.:; and c h i l d r r ·. Hnbcrt mid .ol.n. west of Sp] in^ila!t\ cn'.c.. 'n .:! ."'i *.t'r:il yo ' ' cfi . j i l r s wil.. .. Nc.v Yufir's K\'c p a r l y Muri. ni ':!. KTr:;. Alma M a r ' . . . was a wo;-k- ciid jiursl nf Mr and Mrs Dallas K m i l h on W«.t Knd SUvoi ":· . M i i r t t n is Mr:. Smith':; rou:,m . m i is from \.I\\A- !(( '.. Mr. nnd Mi-:. Leon O u r s t r e . ' . and child "t. K a l h y , Krcd, ;.ov(Mi and M a r v i n of Y a k i r n a , Wash., Open hou.ie was held M tha home of t h e Ilcv. nnd Mrs. H. M. Lewi; 1 .. - m North Main Street New year's Day from to 4 o'clock in th-j iftc-rnrjMi and frorr. 7 t/ P, o'clock in the evening. H was held especially for mem!. ·= (1 f !h.- Fiifi MI.thodJst Church and ppr.vimil frtoiui^. Mrs. H i l l H?ilcy of Mapl: Street spent *\'f«,v Year's Day with het* U i . u i f l i n o t l i c r , Mrs. J, H, Murdocfc. -.vhu baa been ill. The A / u r c 1 first became a way N a t i o n for f l i e i s in 1019 when R N a v y pi.me hupped there from Ncwfnimrlland on the first trans- A t l a n t i c f l i g h t . Not white, not wheat, not rye, out n flavor blend of all three-- Jungc's Roman Meal Bread. 11-19-tf Heights. N.J. Hospllnl. on his now j sp^»i !' 1( - wcekt-nd w i t h M/. O v v r - j legs. Kalph, who was born w l t t m u t I J l l r : - t ' s »i-'Utf. Mrs. Lafe Cupi.s | bonea In his luwer legs, wild: "I I nf WPJ.I Knd Slrrol. Other i»uc.sls; hope I'll be able tu play games with ! i n l l i r h r j l n p " r M r - n n / l M r i - ' the other boys." Ho was released ! Cupps Sin..;.y we Mrs. f . .- I from Uie hospital of UT 13 innnths of t sistrr-in-law. Mrs. A. P. o v e r - - opCTiitions to fit him with artificial | Mn-et. a more and her husband,! limbs from the knee down. A friend, i Mr. and Mrs. Hoy Johnstm, n n d , V i t o S t a m a t o , p n l d most o f t h e M i . a n d Mrs. U i t l Bryant, a l l o f , nnd Mr. and Mrs. Wilhnr.l) $8,000 medical tcej. (JmcnrnKotuiU Tuls.i; Ovrotiool Mr.r FEEL ACHY? OUI TO COLO ' MISERIES/ f* f* ft lymplo^otli: OOO RELIEF J a n u a r y Special! Special Prices This Month Only On 4-6-8-Fool Models New Tone-Tailored Interiors * New Stopping Power .nalongl.MotPl,--»**'.*·;* lh el,no S tin.helo« S l-pnco«lWJ" cw See The Marvelous, Motorless New Servel At Cy Carney Appliance Co. South Side Square Phone 1728 ff whole flock of fine now features! A Fresh New Look ind MW ornimintittai. Solex Safety Glass ,c, helps t«P °ul lic: ?· Faster-Acting Electric Windshield Wiper^ type. Itey never slow dowrtl IjjZ OQ'^J * ' "*' smoother, even sli« »!«· IT'S AT YOUR PLYMOUTH DEALER'S NOW-the finest of all fine Plymouths ever built! And the features described here only begin to tell you its value stoty. Plymouth designers, decorators, engineers have crammed still more quality into every part-have made it, more than ever, "the low-priced -car most like the high-priced cars." See it yourself. Drive II yourself. Compare it with (he others in the lowest-priced field, or even compare it with cars costing hundreds of dollars more. Then vmi be the judge of the car lor the money-the car loi you! now on display utm M cnmun coirotAiion, otirai n.

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