Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas on June 19, 1974 · Page 17
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June 19, 1974

Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas · Page 17

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Fayetteville, Arkansas
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Wednesday, June 19, 1974
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Page 17
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Despite Skimpy Athletic Budget Small School Lands In Big Time I.UBBOCK. Tex. (AP) With a meager $4.000 budget, Tennessee State plunges into the football recruiting wars annually in search of pidgeon-tocd youngsters with long legs, short bodies and square chins. But don't laugh. "We go undefeated last year, win the championship and send five kids to the pros in the first two rounds of the d r a f t , " said Coach John Merrill, one of the East coaches in Saturday tii Bill's All-America football game. What's more, Tennessee Slat--enrollment, about 5,000-has compiled a 93-13-3 record d u r i n g Merrill's 11-year reign lhat includes four national small college championships. "And when the pros take f i v e of young kids in the first two rounds, that dispels all sorts of misnomers about small colleges." Merrill noted with no small amount of pride. A jocular, rotund figure who contends his major personal expense is for cigars, Mcrritl recenlly rejected a job with the pros aixl also spurned an opportunity to become the first black head coach of a predominantly white major university, Wichita State. "1 can do more good for black kids at Tennessee State," he explained simply. His . recruilillg philosophy nearly defies description, let alone credibility, yet tenncssce State ranks behind only Southern Cal and Notre Dame in producing pro prospects. "With a $4,000 recruiting budget and a monthly telephone allowance of J50, we're kinda limited. You can't do much traveling with that and you can't pul too many boys to bedi with that, so we've had to fig-' ure some way to live within our means," he said. 'We don't attract the top football players, and in most cases we don't want the top football players. We go by Ihe anatomical structure of a boy. "A lot of people accuse us of choosing a boy on his looks, and I guess that's accurale. We want a certain body type. There are exceptions, but \ve feel that it takes a certain body type to be a great athlete. "By and large, we feel an Takes After Dad Cincinnati Reds' Pete Rose wipes the dust off the shoos of his son. Pele Jr., In the dugout prior to the game against Montreal Tuesday game and usually takes a lit- night. Pete Jr., 4, follows his tie haltinc practice just with father around the clubhouse his dad. tAP Wirephnto) and the dugout before the Aaron Given New York's Best Award NEW YORK (AP) -- Hank Aaron, acclaimed by Mayor Abraham D. Beame as "one of he world's few authentic icroes." has been given the city's highest award, the Gold edal, an honor usually ie- erved for astronauts and vis- ting heads of state. The 40-year-old home r u n ing was honored at a City Hall welcoming ceremony Tuesday attended by more than 800 city officials, sports dignitaries and ans. Seated on the dais were Mrs. Babe Ruth and Mrs. Lou Gehrig, widows of the Yankee stars. "It is truly fitting that Hank Aaron receive this tribute from our city," Beanie said. "A ionic run record has betongec o New York, t h a n k s to Babe iuth, for 40 years. Now 1 thai -iank has the record, I think it s only fair that we have Honk, too." Earlier this year, Aaron shat lered Ruth's long-standing ca reer home run record of 714. Aaron said it was "a greai thrill" for him to be official!} ivelcomed in this city when Jackie Robinson opened the path for blacks to play in the Former all-white major leagues "To you kids I say, ahpad and get an education and remember no matter how high the mountain, any of us black or white, can climb the. highest mountain,'" Aaron said Earlier, he spoke to ;ibout 5. 000 school children in Harlem' Mount Morris Park, saying, " was jusl 14 years old when heard Jackie Robinson speak i: Mobile. Ala., and that inspire. me." W Wickes Lumber The Perfect l^ff S mr Is You AT A A A. and Wickes "ESBS Kitchen Cabinets · then AiBhuiMrtor Kitchen CabinMri Th« wpertj fine fanitoK fini* has the added pta of being s««iiHwistantl Cfcoon from i HUGE inventory of a Starter Set Includes.... FR/GOJAIR£ QUALITY XT WICKES' LOW PKKXSI $82 ,, $121 ,, ELECTRIC COOK TOP ...«** 1 -piece *p*4BMT tape M BUHJ-M ELEC. WALL OVEN . . . cnioy *· 17~«*dE, automatic cook-master ovenl ..... - EUCTRK RAKE MWtKiHtctanins broiler MeUt ----- ... 4 iBriacch Bach MMCH No. U7 3TK21- KhcfcM Su* $1C8S · VR«g. $17.97 KITCHEN CEILNK Light fixtan 95 SAVE NOW THRU JUNE 26th! f y Wickes Lumber Junction 68E and 71S Near Holiday Inn Mon-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.--Saturday Springdale, Ark. 751-7292 0062-74 B fP-51 ulslanriing alhlcie is a young an with ]ong legs . . . and a lort body . . . that cerlain latomical pliases restrict act hide's ability. "For example, if he's knock :iced. we don't lake him. It e's slewfool. we don't take m. We feel t h a t if he's pid- jonlocd, he's a good athlete nd we'll take him. "And if a boy's got a square hin, he's a hitter. "But basically, we want the ill boy. We wouldn't recruit a ^tensive lineman, or even Tensive lineman, u n d e r 6-4. 1 link t h i s is one reason you find 3 many of our boys being rafted by Ihe pros." Merrill's most recent cclebri- , Ed Jones, was nicknamed Too Tall." He was the Nalion- I Football League's No. 1 draft lioice, the property now of the lallas Cowboys. An all-slate basketball play- r, he had 52 basketball schol- rship offers and one Football nviuiion-from T e n n e s s e e talc. So don't knock the Merrill ystem. Sign Top Choices PHOENIX, Ariz. (AP) --The Vorld Hockey Association'? ewiy arrivcr Phoenix Road unners have signed three ol ieir top draft choices. Bruce .berharl, top junior hockey oalie lasl season; Robbte Vatl, who nelled 50 goals foi ic Fliu Plon Bombers in UIL Veslcrn Canada Junior Hockey .eague, and Jim Clarke, sev nth-round pick from the To onto Marlboros, all signec 'uesday. Jofre Loses Crown MEXICO CITY -- The World ioxing Council withdraw it; ecognilion of Brazil's F,lc 'ofre i\s world Teathetnveigh champion for refusing (o set date La defend his crown. NoHhwtvt Arfcaniet TIMES, Wwf., JUM 19, 1974 * 19 FAYITTIVILLI, A UK AH* Aft Irwin, Palmer Top Contenders Elite Field Entered In Classic AKRON, Ohio (AP) -- Newly ci'ownod U.S. Open champion lale I r w i n and still-dangerous Arnold Palmer head the elite. nvilational field of about 100 players arrayed for the Thurs- lay start in thu $170,000 American Golf Classic. College Tops Club Van Buren VAN BUREN -- Kaycllevi College Club improved its American Legion b a s e b a l l record to 12-4 Tuesday night with a 10-8 win over Van Bu'ren. Brian Holt struck out 11 and allowed just two runs in five iirul o n e t h i t ' d innings of relief, advancing lo 4-1 for the year ivilh the w i n . He replaced starter Clark Lewis. College Club trailed 1-0 and 4-3, but overcame each deficit with a three-run inning. In Ihe second, Van Burcn conlribulcc Iwo runs with errors before Randy Porler hit his first home run of Ihe year. In the third,' Rick Karnbach singled and Rick Taylor nil a two rim homer, also his firsl of ttie season. Mark Prenger followed with his second home run. College Club led 6-5 when Holl singled lo open Ihe sixth. Will Iwo oul. Jackie Davis doubled IIo!t home. Larry Atha Ihen doubled to score Davis, anc Karnbach singled Atha homr. Karnbach scored the 10th run on an error. Dick Harris, the College Club coach, said, "1 was glad lo s^e us get those four runs in the sixth. The ball park al Van Buren is small, and a one-run lead is prelly scary." The Fayetteville leam will play Springdale in a conference game Friday at 6 p.m. The game is set for Legion Field in Fayetteville. "Some of the big names arc nissing, but we've got the King and the kids," one tournament official said. "We're delighted." The King, of course, is the ong-time title applied to the re- uvenated Palmer, who broke a engthy slump with a solid per- ormance in last week's Open. At 44, Palmer still hoies to Sain the one more t r i u m p h he needs to tie Ben Hogan for second place on the all-time victory list. The kids are the title-hungry group of young players who lave played such a dominant role on the pro tour this season. Among them are Forrest Fez- let 1 , runner-no to I r w i n in last week's national championship: third-round leader Tom Watson, plus Jerry Heard, Ben Cren- FT A Defeats Russellville T h e Fayetteville Tennis Association opened defense of its 1973 Arkansas Tennis League c h a m p i o n s h i p recently by defeating the Russellville Racquet Club 81. Allan Bcauchamp began a Fayetteville singles by sweep of defeating the Tad Lowery 6-1, 6-2 at number one. In the second match, John Brooks downed Lonnic Lauders 6-2. 6-0. Jack Pruniski heat Ki'ecl Duvall 6-2. ti-3 in .the third match and Phil Tolbert clipped W y n n Looney 6 3 , 6-2 in fourth. At number five singles, Jim I l e r r i n blitzed Vic Davis 6-1, 6-0. Bill J e n k i n s won the sixth match over Doug Lowery, 6-3. 6-0. UussellviUe's only point came at number one doubles, as Tad Lowery and Looney edged Pruniski and Chuck Okerhloom 7-6. 7-5. In the second and third doubles matches, Duffel and John Teas beat Duvall and Landers fi-4, 6-2 and the team of Herrin-Jenkins topped Doug Lawcry and Young 6-2, 6-fl. shaw, Lanny W a d k i n s . John M a h a f f e y . Tom Kile. Eddie Pearce and Allen Miller. All hul Wadkins either have ivon or finished second this season and Wadkins is t r y i n g lo regain the form lhat enabled lim to set money-winning records as a rookie an (la sophomore in the last two seasons. Other standouts include de- e n d i n g champion Bruce Cramptori of A u s t r a l i a ; Lou Graham and Bert Yancey, who .icd for third in the U.S. Open: bosl pro Bobby Nichols, winner )f Ihe San Diego Open earlier .his season: Tom Weiskopf, winner of last year's World icrics of Golf on the same course; Australian Open ch.im- ·ion J.C. Snead and such 1974 .our lillc-winners as Rod Curl, 3ob Menne, Dave Stockton and 3uddy Allin. They can expect little relief rom the exceptionally hitfh scoring lhat marked last week's U.S. Open. The sile for .he 72-hole lesl t h a t offers a $34,000 first prize is the Inng. rambling Firestone Country "lub course. 7.180 yards play- no a par 20. fl u s u a l l y produces some of the highesl scoring on Ihe pro tour. In 14 tournaments on Ihe course--12 American Golf Classics and Iwo PGA national championships--a score of 273, only five under par, has been good enough to win all but twice. IIP PJMWT 34 East Center Phone: 521-6472 Business Cards, Letterheads, Envelopes, Business Forms, Tickets, Posters, Flyers, Menus, Memo Pads, Church Bulletins, Calendars, Invitations and so on and so fast . . . Wickes Lumber Everyday Values! TSsaafr Visit Wickes today for ail your exterior building remodeling needs. Top quafity merchandise at tow prices is what Wickes is afl about! 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PAINTED GUTTER Durable galvanized gutter, a*- ttactively finished to comply merit your nomri Easily inst»lled-oeed»no«pkeep. 24' Reg. Me · w mar SHOP WICKES TODAY! f Wickes : Lumber .'Unction 68E and 71S Springdale. Ark. 751-7292 Near Holiday Inn Mon-Fri. 8 o.m.-5 p.m. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.--Saturday

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