Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas on May 6, 1974 · Page 7
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May 6, 1974

Northwest Arkansas Times from Fayetteville, Arkansas · Page 7

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Fayetteville, Arkansas
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Monday, May 6, 1974
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Page 7
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Mo 'Neon Sign 7 Laughs 'Good Times' Star Gives Ideas On Comedy I.OS ANGELES (AP) --down by poverty, unemploy- 'Pcoplc who play for comedy tore me." Thai seems an odd statement from Esther Rolle. star of the ! hit CBS comedy series "Good Times." But she explains: "I don't like comedy with neon signs flashing, 'This is comedy, you must laugh.' I've never seen able to appreciate it. "I guess I'm too much of Start Of Bicycle Hike Twenty participants complet- Proceeds from the even! a r e (he journey at (lie Washing- ed the 20-mile bicycle h i k e expected fo exceed last year's Ion County'School for Retard- Inliil of S3CO- The bicyclists -- ~ ' of all ages leff Fayeftevtlle in the morning and terminated | realist. It doesn't tickle my funny bone. That's a great art form, but it's not my taste for doing or watching." It is not that Miss Rolle has anything against comedy.' On the stage, she has been in such comedies as "Day of Absence" and "Happy Ending." "I thought I 'was the great heavy," she said. "People told me I was funny, but I thought of myself as a very serious actress. 1 played it for all I was worth, but I guess that's what brought the comedy out. "I still don't approach my work as a comedian. 1 approach it as very real, and if there's comedy in it 1 hope it comes out of the sincerity. I play the truth of the line, and if (he line is funny it will come Saturday sponsored by t h e Northwest Arkansas Associn- tion for Rclardcd Children. ed Children. Mike Davis was c h a i r m a n for the benefit. (TIMESpltolft hy Ray Gray) Language Schools Are Thriving In Brazil SAO PAULO, Brazil (AP) -A booming English language school business in Brazil re- fleets extensive American investment in Ihe country and Bra/ilians' ambitions to travel, study abroad and participEii.e in international affairs. Eliana Vaz Troslc, who is capitalizing on the boom, says she had no trouble getting her new English school, named STOP, started in the expanding economy. "It's easy to borrow money From banks here, in fact ioans for new businesses arc encouraged," she told a visitor to the school. · Out front -- almost larger than the school itself -- stands an oversized bright red imitation of .an American traffic stop sign. And stop traffic il .Iocs, much to Miss Vaz Trosle's delight. All over Sao Paulo you can gee banners and signs hanging Urban Sprawl WASHINGTON (AP) -- If Environmental Protection Agency estimates prove true, urban sprawl, pavement, other public facilities and recreation may spread over an area as big as air New England by the year 2000. EPA's educated guess is that increasing population and market demands will require by then the duplication of all the schools, pipelines, highways, airports, etc., ever built in this country. from renovated houses advertising advanced teaching methods and native English spjak- crs within. There are more t h a n 45 schools to choose from in Sao Paulo alone. ALL METHODS Yon, can find anything from such modern methods as ; tudio- visual, aural-oral and tolal im- ncrsion to the ancient ap- iroach of read, translate, conjugate and decline. The most popular English is A m e r i c a n , although some schools, such as York, offer British English. "We consider t more refined," suid Sniidrn Fcklslem, standing in as director of York while her parents were away. As thousands of Brazilians yearn to learn English, schools of all descriptions grow to meet the demand in Sao Paulo, Rio do Janeiro and other cities. Herbert Olscn, director of The Brasas school in Sao Paulo said: "Seven years ago we opened in Rio with 40 students. Today we register 4,000 branches of Brasas scattered around the country. And that's just Brasas." Doing some quick calculations of enrollment in other major schools, he added: "1 would guess that in Rio now there are 50,000 adults studying English on their own time and with their own money." The surge of English schools began in 19IJ-1 when Brazil's military-run government welcomed new foreign investment and mobilized (he country for rapid economic growth. Since then, Brazil has profiled itself into prominence on .ho international market. STATUS AID A Brazilian going out into the work! with a bilingual tongue irings status to Brazil. Above all. however, English cat) nelp ensure a place in local big business and a lofty income bracket. "It can mean the difference Between a top executive posi- .ion and one half-way up the ladder," said Olsen. "For a secretary, it is the difference between $100 and over $500 a month in salary." Jeff Holdorf of the U.S.-based Berlitz school, which opened Sao Paulo in 1973, puts it this way: "A Brazilian executive with a good knowledge of English may wonder why his deal fell through. It is the subllcti of the language that make the difference and even an interpreter can't help. "We give the student not only the idiomatic expressions but also the habits and customs ol Americans, should he or she be planning to live in the States for any length of time." A Canadian reporter has contended that some habits and customs of Americans are Liking hold in Brazil. "Brazilians of the urban middle class are Incoming more like Americans." wrote Pierce Fenhagen in an article printed recently in a Montreal newspaper. "They are dynamic, hard working, money oriented. The system is straight, free-enterprise capitalism." out.' "Good Times" is about a black family that's down bul not out. The comedy comes rn^ their refusal to be put ment, rejection or prejudice, "We may be poor, but we're not losers," she says. "If vou've got love you're a winner, And we've got love." In the show, Florida lives in Chicago with her three children and her usually unemployed lusband, played by John Amos. In private life. Miss Rolle has no children and is separated 'rom her husband. "I think it's very very much of the reality of ghetto life," she said. "1 have quarrels with a few things. Usually, we can straighten them out. Since this is supposed to be a comedy, some people said, 'How can you talk about such depressing things and hope to make people laugh?' "I tried to explain that poor people have more laughs t h a n rich people -- by necessity. "When you're poor yoj don't cry all day long. In fact you don't have time for it. Some people wondered why talk about a family that's poor in such an affluent country. I said we'd f i n d ' more sympathetic ears for such a show than 10 years ago. "The energy crisis showed a lot of white middle-class people what it's like when you want to work and can't f i n d a job," Miss Rolle was born not in a city but in Pompano Beach, ?la. She was brought up on a arm with her 17 brothers and sisters. After graduating from high school in Miami, Miss Rolle set jut to be a writer and enrolled in classes in New York City. When she performed with a fel low student in an original dramatic sketch, a professor suggested she should be acting in ilead of writing. She promptly switched to dramatic classes and later became one of the original mem- berss of the Negro Ensemble Theater company in New York. "I was raising hell on Broadway in 'Don't Play Us Cheap' with my $140 take home pay when I was asked to try out for 'Maude,' " she said. "To me being on Broadway was as big as you can go. I didn't want to come out here and be a Hollywood maid. * savored my position as an ac tress in a leading role on Broadway. "I'd never looked at TV. I had never considered mysel film material. But the screen test sounded so glamorous was my chance to find out wha it was like." The TIMES Is On Top of The News Seven Days a Week Arkamot TIMES, MM., May «, 1974 ft 7 Today In History Today is Monday, May 6, the 7lh day of 1974. There are 239 days left in the year. Today's highlight in history: On this date in 1942, in the 'acific war. the exhausted American and Philippine garrison at Corregidor surrendered :o the Japanese after resisting 150 days. On this date. In 1856, the Austrian neurologist who founded psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, was born. In 1861, Arkansas withdrew from the Union. In 1889, the Eiffel Tower in Paris was opened as a world's fair began. In 1910, the Edwardian era came to an end with the death of Britain's King Edward VII. In 1941, Joseph Stalin became premier of the Soviet Union, succeeding V.M. Molotov. In 1955, West Germany joined he North Atlantic Treaty Or- anization. Ten vears ago: It w» ttv ounced that U.S. Secretary of defense Robert McNamara ould go to Bonn to discuss West German weapons purchased from the United States. Five years ago: A new gov- rnment in Northern Ireland eclared an amnesty Tor p*r- ons arrested in civil rights dis- rders. One year ago: Mexico re- eased 30 prisoners and flew iem to Cuba, as demanded by idnapers of the U.S. consul eneral in Guadalajara, Terance Leonhardy. Today's birthdays: Retired aseball star Willie Mays is 42 ears old. Actor and director }rsen Welles is 59. 5'/4% TERMITES r* CALL ADMIRAL PEST CONTROL Roaches, Ants, Spider*, etc. COMMERCIAL « RESIDENTIAL.' 442-7298 7V4* We have · lavtagi frofnm and Interest rat* to me* you need*. Foyerteville Saving* Loan Association m N. Ea«t * 521-3521 OPEN DAILY S-10; SUNDAY CLOSED MON., TUES., WED. NSTALLATIO AVAILABLE Days Only Guaranteed As Long As You Own Your Car K mart's* heavy-dirty mufflers are aluminum and zinc coated with double wrapped shells for protection against rust-out for longer service life. Sizes to fit most U.S. cars. Come in and save! USE YOUR KMART CHARGE CARD 71 B North at Rolling Hills Drive in Foyerteville, Arkansas Orig. $40 to $65 Sporty and Versatile Rainy Day Toppers Now 25.99 to 42,99 Brave any rain storm in a rainy day coat. Wear it with pants, skirts, suits, even on sunny days. A great way to add snap to your wardrobe and a great way to add pennies to your pocket book. Shown are just two of the many styles from which you can select. Rainwear--DILLARD'S--First Floor PRINCESS GARDNER* Honeysuckle Accessories $4 KEy-GardS "Gad-About" Secretary Cigarette Case Clutch Matching Accessories from $4 $13 *5 $10 Something for every woman . . . Embroidered flowers swirl prettily against glazed cowhide. Chase the dull, drab every day look away with these Honey, suckle accessories. How sweet they are! Handbags--DILLARD'S--First Floor Open Monday Through Saturday Nights Until 9

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