The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on May 5, 1936 · Page 4
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 4

Publication:
Location:
Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, May 5, 1936
Page:
Page 4
Start Free Trial
Cancel

The Algona Upper Idea Moines, Algona, Iowa, May 5,1036 Cfert Party— Tb« Episcopal Guild entertained «t a benefit card and theatre party Wednesday afternoon at the State theatre, which space was dona f ed by Gail Pettit Elizabeth Bergner fit "Escape Me Never," was presented. While the 52 women who were to play contract saw the movie, the eight tables of auction bridge Were played In. the lobby. Prizes donated by local merchants were won by Mrs. Josephine Stanton, hot oil shampoos by the Sue Morlan shop; Mrs. H. M. Potter, a garment cleaned and pressed by Modern Dry Cleaners; and Mary Kain, a gift which had been donated. The auction players witnessed the show while contract was played. Prizes were permanent wave to Mrs. W. B. Quarton from the State Beauty shop; what-not' from Foster's to Mrs. H. V. Hull:' Mrs. P. V. Janse received a box of chocolates from Blackstone Cafe, j Mr. Pettit gave a door prize, a six months' pass to his theatre, which was won by Mrs. H. H. Furst. The hostesses were Eleanor Fraser, Mrs. Glen Raney, Mrs. Claire Anderson and Mrs. B. F. Crose. Convention— The annual conference of the Northwest Iowa district of Woman's Home Missionary society was held Friday at the Methodist church with one hundred thirty present, representing the following towns: Algona, Brltt, Hurt, Clarion, Clear Lake. Corwlth, Estherville. Fort Dodge. Emmetsburg, Garner, Goldflcld, Graettinger. Lake Mills. Laurens, Livermore, LuVerne, Mallard, Ruthven, Thornton and Tltonka, A pot luck luncheon was served at noon and in the evening the Queen Esthers gave a banquet In observance of the 50th anniversary of their organization. Favors and decorations were carried out In the golden motif. Four conference officers were present, Mrs. G. W. Eggleston, Plerson; Mrs. W. M. Hubbard. Fort Dodge; Mrs. A. A. Vander Wilt, Otho; and Miss Minnie Robison, Kansas City. Auxiliary Meet— Auxiliary members held an open meeting Friday evening at the Legion hall. Miss Minnie Coate gave a talk on Hawaii, Mrs. D. E. Miller sang several selections and Arlene Hargreaves played several selections on the piano. Bridge was played later and Mrs. C. H. Swanson received the first prize. I Embroidery Club— Mrs. Homer Anderson entertained the members of the Embroidery club Thursday afternoon. The women spent the afternoon at their fancy work and later refreshments were served. Birthday Dinner- Mrs. Henry Lund was guest of honor at a birthday dinner given on Sunday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Myron Ludwig. Sixteen were present and spent the afternoon socially. Social Calendar X Club MM*I~ The X club, made up of former LuVerne teachers and board members met at the Algona Country Club Sunday for their third annual reunion and dinner. Some eighteen members were present for the four course dinner, served by Frank Mathes. This was followed by an afternoon of bridge and monopoly. Kate Skinner won high score prize ,or women and B. Agard high prize for men at bridge. Mr. and Mrs. Phil Llchty were awarded the low prize for men and women. In monopoly, Austin Burtls won high prize and Mrs. Joe Llchty the low prize. Irene Swenson won the cut prize. 1937 officers ,were elected by the club as follows: Ange Roorda, Clear Lake, president; Jess Lindebak. LuVerne, secretary and treasurer and Mrs. A. D. Burtls as committee chairman. Those In attendance from Algona were: Dr. P. V. Janse, Dr. and Mrs. M. G. Bourne, Mr. and Mrs. B. T. Agard, Mrs. Anna Skinner; from LuVerne were Mr. and Mrs. Joe Llchty. Mr. and Mrs. Phil Llchty, Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Burtis, Mr. and Mrs. Jess Llnde- bak; Miss Irene Swenson of Armstrong and Bernice Swenson of Osage; Ange Roorda of Clear Lake and Kate Skinner of Fort Dodge were also present. Birthday Club— The women of her birthday club met jt the home of Mrs. Frank Vera Friday afternoon in honor of her birthday. The time was spent in playing bridge and high prize went to Mrs. James Watts. Mrs. John Storm received low and the ttavel prize went to Mrs. Andrew Godfredson. Guests of the club were Mrs. E. J. Hartshorn and Mrs. William Geerlng. The women presented Mrs. Vera with handkerchiefs. Club Hostefts— Mrs. E. L. DeZclIar was hostess to her bridge club Thursday at a luncheon-bridge party. Mrs. O. W. Erickson received high prize, Mrs. P. J. Kohlhaas the second prize, and the low prize went to Mrs. W. A. Barry. A guest of the club was Mrs. A. C. Wiliey. Hostess Thursday Eve— Mrs. Owen Nichols entertained her club Thursday evening at her home. Bridge was played at two tables. Mrs. A. W. Amunsen received the first prize, Mrs. L. M. Merritt the low prize. Mrs. J. W. Daw was a guest. Book Club Saturday— Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Bishop entertained the Book Club members Saturday evening at a dinner. During the after-dinner hours. Mrs. A. E. Michel reviewed the book. "A Daughter of the Nohfu," by Madame Sugimoto. Club Hostess Thursday— Members of the HI-Lo club were guests of Mrs. Joe Harig Thursday evening. Mrs. Fred Bartholomew received the high prize, and Mrs. W. P. Hemphill the low prize. Thursday, May 7 Presbyterian Helping Hand society at 2:30 at churrh. Hostesses Mrs. Marc Moore, Mrs. Mawdsley. Mrs. Rudy Gudcrian. Mrs. Wade Little and Mrs. Lawrence Gillespie. M. E. Ladies' Aid to meet nt 2:30. Mrs. Harris' division to serve. Please note change of time. Ladles' Aid of First Lutheran churrh to meet at 2:30 p. m. in church with Mesdames Willis Bits- borough. D. D. Monlux. Albert Olson as hostesses. Bible Study Acts 8. Tuesday, May 12 D. A. R. will meet for one o'clock luncheon at home of Miss Ella Thompson with Mesdames Jos. Oosgrove and P. V. Janse assisting. Mnrgaret Stephenson, who I* studying music at the Morningside college, Sioux City, presented her first public piano recital Monday evening of last week. Marjorie Or- wiek, vocalist, another student, was also featured on the recital. Margaret, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. J. Stephenson. played twelve selections, compositions by Bach, Rachmaninoff, Tschaikowsky. Schubert, and Armstrong, Swea City Folks Tell of Tornado's Ravages Correspondents of The «Algona Upper Des Molnes followed the path of destruction left by the tornado which cut across northwestern Iowa last week, and reported the following stories. The tornado Itself missed northwest Kossuth county by only a few miles, but the effects were felt even though the tornado did fortunately swerve north Into Minnesota. CASEY LOSS Democratic Candidate for Sheriff .'of Kossuth County Your Support Will be Appreciated Post-Nuptial Shower— j Lydia Meyer entertained Thursday evening in a post-nuptial compliment to Mrs. Peter Chubb, tho former Philomcna Quinn. Monopoly was the entertainment and the prize was received by Mrs. Chubb. Guests included the six girls employed in the Cummings store where the honoree is employed. They presented her with a gate leg table. Invitations to Dance Party— Invitations are out for a dancing party which is being held Saturday evening at the Country Club. Hosts and hostesses arc the following couples, W. W. SulUvans, L.. C. Nugents, Eugene Murtaghs. W. D. Andrews, F. C. Scanlans and Melzer Falkenhainers. Sunday School Party— The children of the First Lutheran Sunday School and their parents enjoyed a pot luck supper on Friday night at the church with about 100 present. Amusements such as the fish pond and candy booth, etc., were enjoyed in the evening. Pot Luck Dinner— Their bridge club met Sunday for a pot luck dinner at the Cliff Aalfs home. Bridge was played later and high prize went to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Larson and low to Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Aalfs. Travel prize was received by Mrs. Robert Larson. Band and Orchestra Entertained— Members of the Algona high school band and orchestra met at the State Park, with their director D. Wane Collins. Wednesday evening f;;r a joint rehearsal and picnic, following %vhich games were played. Club Hostess— Mrs. T. H. Chrischilles entertained her bridge club Monday afternoon with her house guest. Miss Alice McNeely, as the g uest of honor. Mr*. Roy Keen received the first prize. JUNIOR THEATRE Equal Opportunity With the Call Theatre on Tuesday and Saturday Register at Either Theatre on Every Tues. and' Sat. All Afternoon Prices—10c-16c Thursday, Friday and Saturday John Wayne in "THE DAWN RIDER" Mickey's Polo Team and Fighting Marines Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday TWO FINK ATTRACTIONS HIT NO. I THE FINEST, FUNNIEST "FAMILY- PICTURE" OF THE YEAH - EVERYDOVff OLD MAN with ROCHEUE HUDSON JOHNNY DOWNS NORMAN FOSTER 40tK Ccntu/y fo* Pittu/el This will make everybody happy. You wanted more of him when lie finished "Steamboat Hound the Bond " HIT NO. 2 Howard Hill in "The Last Wilderness" THRILL HIGHLIGHTS 1. Thrilling scenes of the un- jiual rodeo at Cody, Wyoming. 2. Mother bear in hibernation. 3. Killer bear in a battle to the death. i. A woodpecker building Us borne. 5. An American eagle iu iu neat. 6. Herds of antelope, deer, elk, and moose. 7. Fi»b caught with a bow and arrow. b. A coyote and a wildcat in a litrce battle 9, A terrific light between two bull elk for pack domination. IU. Amazing feata with bow and arrow. 11. Picturesque scenes of Wyoming Natural Arch in the hiyh Rockies. 12. Scenc-s uf tile < ira^ishoppc-r Gia.ch.-r phenomenon. J3. Heuuirkauie bceiiwo of U;o "Parade of the Strutting Grouse." 14 Baby moose rescued from rapids. Juniors-Seniors From Whittemore. Enjoyed Banquet Whittemore: The Junior-senior banquet of the Whittemore public' school was held last Wednesday iiiKht at 6 o'clock at Kinmclsburg. The Man With the Hoe was given by Mnynard Roebcr; Our Gardens. I.eomi Muss; A Garland of Hoses. Matilda Wagner; Hoses of 1'k-ardy. lola and Myrtle Barber. Toads. Snakes and Butterflies. Fred Fish; Uoses. Miss Blair; Bunch of Forget-Me-Nots. R. Shelimeyer and V'erda Meyer, Harold Voigt, Louis Dogotrh. Irene Heller, Irene Connors, Hex Hwanson, John Fish, and Miss Hurley; Beautiful Lady in Blue, Harold Voigt, Fred Fish, John Kish and Hex Swanson; Our Favorite Flowers, Kobert Voigt, Flowers from an Old Bouquet, Prof. Kochfnid, Memories, all. The teachers present were Mr. and Mrs. Frank ftuchford. Mis* Hurley. Miss Lindstrom. Miss Blajr, a/id Miss Sainmin. This banquet was given by Die juniors to the seniors of this yeiir who are as follows: Matilda Wagner. Irene f"tin- ners. Ii.la and Myrtle Barber. Eve- I lyn Viuj»t. Lewis In.goteh, Harold I «, hum tihci. Hi< hitrd .Shelimeyer, Hex Sv, an^uii. Kobert Voight. and John ,in<i l-'nii Fish. (By Erene Irmlter) (Armstrong Correspondent) A terrific tornado ripped through the west end of Emmet county, Thursday night about 5 o'clock, causing nearly a half million dollars' worth of damage. Injured In Emmet county were Otto Woods, Ivan Book, Bonnie Rousseau, Lillian Billings, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur West and two sons, Mr. and Mrs. George West, Jr., and daughter, Sheldon Sifert and Bert Johnson of Estherville, Mrs. Roy Richards and Otis Olson Dolliver, and a baby of Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Cummins, Dolliver. Hospital Hit Hospital attendants at the Coleman hospital, Estherville, were kept busy receiving patients and cleaning the hospital surgical rooms from debris blown in through open windows. All glass in the hospital was shattered. The storm came from Miiford, hit the north end of Estherville. going through Dolhver. and on into Minnesota, subsiding near Blue Earth. Just west of Dolliver on a farm occupied by Jake Vigdal, the family took refuge in the basement of their home and when the house was destroyed the automobile was carried a distance and landed in the basement with the family, but nobody was injured. Other Farm* Hit Near the Minnesota line, farms j occupied by J. H. Lester and Edward Grettenberg were hit. On the Lester place the house and half of the barn was left standing. Sev f cral buildings on the Grettenberg place were destroyed. The Jim Miller farm was completely destroyed, except the house. The Rufus Cummings and Harry Clark farms were destroyed. The storm tore an infant baby from Mrs. Cummings' arms, but the child was found alive in a nearby field soon after. Hands Park In Ruins Near Fairmont, at Hands Park, the storm did some of its worst damage. The Gay Paree. a night club pavilion, was a mass of kindling wood, although the Hands home was left standing, but damaged. The Myra Briggs home, a few rods west of the dance pavilion, was partly unroofed, and a large barn destroyed. John Brockmann farm home just north of Hands Park was completely destroyed. The family was in the house, which was demolished, then caught fire. Mrs. Brockmann ran into the road and stopped a car. With help, they pulled Mr. Brockmann from the flaming debris. ArimtronK Mati'H Brother A brother of George Peterson of Armstrong, and his family, were caught In the tornado on the road north of Hands Park. The wind caught the car and turned it over several times, Injuring the occupants badly. Taken to Armstrong by another machine, they were given aid and arc expected to recover. The tornado was considered the worst storm in 34 years. By Ida Larson (Swea City Correspondent) Picture with me, sturdy oaks and beautiful farm homes mowed to the ground, and you have some idea of the catastrophe, which hit Emmet county, Iowa, and Martin county, Minnesota, in last Thursday's tornado. The tornado lasted perhaps five minutes In each place, killing two people In Martin county and injuring between 75 and 100 more. The dead In Martin county arc Ray Schelmskl, 19, Silver Lake; Emmet Barnett, 45, Tenhassen township. Critically Injured were J. P. Brockmann, 45, Silver Lake; Lon Owens. 65, East Chain; Mrs. Wrn. Detert, 47, Tenhassen township. Animals Killed Throughout the territory, after the disaster, while rescue workers were busy searching for persons Injured, other crews were doing a humanitarian work. Occasional rifle shots were heard. Each shot indicated that some animal had been found beyond any cure, and the only way out was death. Immediately. On the farm known as "The Tall Oaks," occupied by Otto Ahren, the buildings were demolished. The log house, oldest building in Martin county, was left intact. This plac 1 once served as a fort. On Kennedy Farm I want to give an account of one arm home visited, occupied by Ed Cennedy, brother of Mike and Joe Kennedy of Swea township. Not me tree was left on this farm, not one building, not even a chicken coop. Mr. Kennedy stood beside a borrowed truck in what was once he yard of his home, waiting for .he chickens to come home to roost, ntcnding to catch them and take hem to a neighbors farm. Some of he chickens returned, minus their 'eathers, gingerly picking a place o roost. The Kennedys were trapped Inside their house as the tornado struck but managed to get into the basement just as the house was orn from its foundation and carried 50 feet. A horse from the >arn was blown into the basement of the house, hitting a babe, but the child was uninjured. Mrs. Kennedy suffered bruises from falling :ement. Similar scenes of damage nnd disaster were found all the way along the path of the tornado—destructive to the extent of thousands of dollars. cellars, but fortunately the tornado swerved from its course, and missed Kossuth county. At Bancroft, reports stated that shortly after the time of the tornado at Estherville, hall stones fell as large as baseballs, and many automobile tops were ruined, although springs crops were not far enough along to be damaged to any great extent. Only good thing about the atmospheric condition was the fact that it brought much-needed rain to this section. Death came to at least three persons directly as result of the tornado, and many scores were injured, some of them so seriously they may not survive. Near Fairmont, at Hands Park, all buildings, cottages and homes were completely demolished. In one instance, fire added to the terror, completing the destruction. At Estherville. one third of the city was without light and telephone service, and the Coleman hospital was seriously damaged. All windows in the hospital were broken, and Instruments in the operating room soaked by a drenching: rain which followed the twister. Local men In several instances phoned to the stricken area and offered assistance, but it was reported that all Injured were being cared for, and local help was sufficient to handle the cases of distress. MORE USED CARS Priced Right Easy Terms All Our Cars Are Put Into 1st class Condition 1933 Ford V-8 Coach, almost new 1988 Ford V-8 coach, good condition, new paint 1982 Plymouth 4 floor sedan, good condition 1982 Chevrolet coach, excellent condition 1929 Chevrolet Coach, good condition 1929 Hudson 4 door sedan, good condition, priced cheap 1928 Ford 4 door sedan 1928 Chevrolet coach and dthers Also good John Deere plows. Later models coming In again this week "on new cars, WATCH OUR USED CAB LOT FOB BABGAINS Opening Evening* and Sundays Phone MS Maxwell Motors READ U. D. M. WANT ADfl—IT PAYS RITES WEDNESDAY FOR LUVERNE MAN Rev. Schuldt Preached Sermon at Elmer Green Services A murderous tornado missed venting the full force of its fury on Kossuth county by a few miles, late Thursday afternoon, last week, but the effect of Its damage was felt throughout the county. Starting at Miiford, the destructive forces of nature vented their fury on Arnold's Park, the countryside along: the way, whipped Into Esthervillc about 4:30 p. m. and wrecked homes and stores in a six block area, before it swung north toward Fairmont and disappeared into southern Minnesota, where it did further damage. Keen From Kosituth Kcadcrii of the Algonn Upper Des Moines living near Armstrong reported seeing the tornado approach Estherville. In northwest Kossuth county they took refuge in storm —OF— Coats & Suits AT— Christensen's A Sale of Genuine Worthwhile Savings You may choose from our entire stock 01 Spring Wool Suits and Coats now and save several dollars on every garment. More Than 150 New This Season's Garments to Choose From Christensen Bros. Co. Algona's Style Center cntA Mr. and Mr- Ot Lincvilif. Mo. ,ir.-- '.-.,!•,; tint v, i'h n-|.-iti Mr. .-tad Mr. Hn. • tiid Mi. ,>ml Mi.-. :;.• i..t- r Iiojii ,S'.t-ri ,I.-HI:,,.; with rcl itiv :nid Moi.d.iy. ridmx tha here. Laui-k. Kr, Joim Kilcheii- i. Minn . were -.5 Here Kund.iy LuVerne: Elmer Green, who haci died a week ago Sunday auer a long illness, waa buried Wednesday afternoon in the LuVerne cemetery following services held at the M E. church. Rev. V. V. Schuldt preached the sermon and Mrs. Harry Lichty, Benona Neal, Dwlght Baker and Harold Turpin sang xev- eial favorite hymna of the deceas ed. Ur. T. L. Williams, J. E. Linde bak, J. L. Uchty, Lloyd Zentner Henry Kteussy and John Devine served as casket bearers. Mr. (Ireen waa almost 53 year: old and had lived his entire life in this vicinity. He was married to Grace Brewer i May 1, VMl, and four children were from i burn to this union, all of whom ttia i survive. They are Win. of Sexton' | <'Ian-nee, Kdward ami Edith, all at j home. His ayc-d father, James j 'jic-.-n. and four grandchildren. i mourn hi.-> lo.^.s. i Curbing .Move and Mrs. ft L f'orbin moved ii.,.i;:i,ii-r ,,f W.ilter Ktrueck- . . , .. , ,hn,.c-.ud at the- Lutheran I Thursday ,nto the ^ home _ they re- i, .Sunday. They named her ....... — - Kmm i. Mi... John KiU hen- er and Krwin Struecker Were Mr and Mr*. Bernard Halm and -ion from Eik.j'icr spent the week i-nd wiih the former's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Olio Hahn. Bernard 13 emplyo>:d with the- slule highway The- Methodist Ladies' Aid and liirthdi.y club held their regular meeting ut the home of Mrs. Har- ',c-y .Simp:-.on Thursday. Mrs. I,uw- temc- Laidky and Mrs Hoy Car- h;,lc v.eie a^sistmt< hostesses. i Mr and Mrs. .\'ick Sernon and ilr. and Mrs. Jim iio^an a-nd son Stanley informed relatives here that they arrived in Los Angeles, ' i 'aliformu, Thursday of last week, I and c-njuyc-d their trip to California i und the ivarm vvc-uther there. Thoau from lu-rc- who attended Ihe funeral ot Wash Harris Satur- djy atieroooit at West Bead were Air. und Mrj. Henry Schultz and daughter. Kdnu. the <ieo. &hulU i^uidy, the Krwin Bargmiiiis a;id Ihe Will Baruuiami. all reluUved of : Supi a.14 Mrs. A C. Eva-lu weut | to Dccuruh Friday afternoon W spend the week end with uu mother. cently purchased, formerly owned by Ed Karnus. Mr. and Mrs. Bekman. Alton, Mrs. Corbin'a parents, spent the week with the Corbina. Herbert Smith continues to be .ii-nously ill at his home. The Methodist Aid is serving a Mother and Daughter banquet at the City Hall Wednesday evening. May 6. An interesting toast program is being planned. Mtadames F. I. Chapman, Emil Meyer. Lee Uchty, Irvin Chapman Grant Jeiinuijjs, and Miss Lottie Mason were among thcuw who attended meetings of the Fort Dodge Presbytery at Algona last week. Kossuth Men Lead District Legion Meet Kossuth county American Legion leaders played prominent parts Hi the eighth district program held today at Forest City. R. J. Laird, state adjuutiit, H. Bowmac of Swea City, G. i>. Bruudage of Al^ojia, and other* have important places on the program- A parade, drum and bu^le corps contest, doJice nnd card party was to conclude the meeting this even- lag CHEVROLET DEALER Ik announces H| THE MOST AMAZING If! USED CAR VALUES '%&Lte0*..^ ^f*» . F' SAVE THREE 1935 CHEVROLET TRUCKS Long wheel bases, 10 ply tires, mighty clean jobs. 1931 MODEL A TRUCK Ford, Long wheel base, refinished. 1931 CHEVROLET TRUCK Dual tired, short wheel base, good buy. 1931 MODEL A TOWN SEDAN Ford, repainted and refinished. 1930 DE SOTO SEDAN Here's a clean job. just overhauled. 1930 PONTIAC COACH Fine shape, uiany miles left in u. 1930 CHEVROLET SEDAN Four door job, new pistons and repainted. 1929 CHEVROLET SEDAN Runs good and just refinished. 1931 BUICK SEDAN A car that has been put in nice shape. 1929 CHEVROLET SEDAN Runs good, priced to move immediately. 1934 CHEVROLET COACH Standard model, real buy in good used car. TWO 1935 CHEVROLET COACHES Master jobs, clean and low mileage. 1934 FORD V-8 SEDAN Clean, low mileage, ready to drive away. VISIT US FOR BETTER VALUES-TODAY}

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,200+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free