The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on November 8, 1934 · Page 8
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 8

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Algona, Iowa
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Thursday, November 8, 1934
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Page 8
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The Algona Upper Pea Moines, Algona Iowa. November 8, 1934 Sugar Beet Growers to Meet Tuesday, November 13, Buffalo Center 1935 Average Chit is Plan; Committee to Be Named A meeting tar sugar beet growers in Wlnnebago and Kossuth counties will be held at Buffalo Center, Tuesday night, October 13, to discuss the sugar beet adjustment program. There arei about about 80 beet growers in Kossuth county. H. E. Nichols of the Iowa Extension Service, Ames, In charge of the sugar beet program in Iowa, will meet with the growers to explain the sugar situation and to discuss the main points of the adjustment contract. One or more committwmen will be elected at the meeting to helo with the sign up campaign. Since the contracts will be handled through the county agent's office the organization will be on a county basis. Second Meeting 1'lanned The following week a second mooting will be held at which details of the contract will be explained and an opportunity given the growers to sign the contract. The AAA's program for sugar has five principal objectives, according to Mr. Nichols. They are: 1. To insure stability to the domestic producers of sugar beets and cane by giving them a virtual guarantee of fair exchange or parity returns on a, level of production representing moral continental sugar than has ever been .successfully sold In a single year. 2. To assure greater stability to the sugar Industry through the provision of adequate returns for the insular Committee to Advise With Farmer* in Foreclosures The Kossuth county committee appointed to assist fanners who are liable to have their farms taken for foreclosure, announced that they will hold meetings In Algona at the court house on November 13 and 27 beginning at 2 p. m. Any farmer who has been foreclosed or threatened with foreclosure proceedings should Immediately get In touch with this committee, which Is composed of the following members: N. A. Smith, chairman, Algona, H. E. Hist, Algona, secretary, W. A. Murray, vice chairman, Bancroft, Bert Coder, Lakota, O. W. Bleich, Burt, Ed Edwards, Ottosen. This committee Is ready to advise you In regards to your rights and be of any assistance possible, without anw expense to farmers. KOSSUTH FARMS AND FOLKS Smith Mid Edward Allen. FteH Representatives (By Louis B. Smith) Jake Oodden who lives a half mile east and 2% miles south of Burt, is ivlng one of the first farm sates of season on Tues- [dlay, November 13th Jake has rented his 30 acre farm to Fred Ijennirigs, a capable fanner now living iear TUonka, Iwttl no doubt who take CORN FODDER CONTRACTS NOW READY TO SIGN possessions but preventing the Impact of Insular overproduction from so depressing the market as to decrease returns to domestic producers. 3. To contribute to the economic rehabilitation of Cuba by restoring to Cuba a portion of the American market that was lost to the insular possessions by virtue of the tariff policy. 4. To seek to restore Cuban purchasing power to some extent 90 that the market for the products of the 817,000 acres of American farm land which has been lost during the past 4 year, may In part be restored. 5. To protect the consumer against price advances resulting from the processing tax. A tnrlff reduction will be made in an equal amount to the processing taxes, thus preventing any Increased cost to consumers. To Reduce *35 Acreage The contract covers the 1935 crops and at the discretion of the Secretary of Agriculture, the 1938. The "farm owner or tenant who has control of the land for 1935 and 1938, and who grew beets either in 1933 or 1934, may sign the contract and receive allotments. The grower will be asked to reduce his 1935 acreage under that of 1933. The total acreage reduction will not be more than 10 per cent of the 1933 acreage for the sugar beet district. In Hands of County Agent; November 7 Set as Signing Deadline Contracts are now In the hands of all county drought directors, who are the county agents and are ready to be signed. Producers of corn fodder or stover who have flgned application blanks and also those who have not previously signed such blanks but have cut fodder may sign contracts. The form of the contract Is comparatively simpk. In all cases in which the producer Is not certain of the exact tonnage, he should sign for tin- larger amount. For example. If ho i not nice whether he will have 12 or 15 tons, he should .sign for 15 tons, for there will be no penalty attached If he finds late rthat he can deliver only 12. Signing for the larger amount, however, will give him the assurance that if he Is unable to move his material by April 1, 1935. that the government will take care of the 15 tons while If he had signed for only ' 12, he might have 3 tons on his hands. The government will be lenient in care of the The Goddens [do not know, at the present time just where they will move. Jake said that they would probably move to Algona if they could find a satisfactory house. Although this sate will not be' one of the largest on record, Jake has kept his machinery and tools In fine condi- ditlon and anyone bidding at this itde may rest assured he is not buying a lot of old junk. There are some extra good cows to be sold that day and a flock of Plymouth Rock pullets that axe about ready to start laying. Jake said he didn't know how many pullets there are as he hasn't counted 5 POINTS OF MA PROGRAM IN DISCUSSION The price the Agricultural Adjustment Administration will pay for seed corn on which it -exercises its option next spring will be $1.25 per bushel Instead of $1.00 as previously announced, according to word received by O. A. Bonn.stetter, county agent. Many farmers have mad Inquiry at our office and the following information will clear up questions many of the farmers are asking dally. The Agricultural Adjustment Administration expects to have contracts for optioning seed corn available soon. The plan Is intended to check unsealing and feeding of corn which Ls suitable for seed. It is expected that most of the corn contracted for under this plan in Iowa will be in the southern part of the state. However, should they require seed corn, northern Iowa, Koasuth county in partchilar can fur- nth an excellent source as many ex- cellant corn breeders and exhibitors reside in the county, states Mr. Boun- stetter. Under the seed corn conservation plan the AAA will select crito of corn suitable for seed in Iowa, South Dakota, Kansas, Minn*sola and Missouri. Any suitable corn now under seal or which the owner Ls willing to place under seal may be contracted through the Commodity Credit Corpwaticn which Is acting as the fiscal agent of the administration in this program. In ud- ciition to tht? loan of 55 cents per bu- slu-1, tin; owner will be paid -0 emu per bushel \Un<'h will give t::e AAA the nptnn oi bi.\ii;i; this seed at $1 ^ |K-r bushel on 1,1- U-fur.- May 1. 1U35. Tile o'ltion m;:• I,.' t .x«-rct.^-(l by th adniini .train n iu .n^unv the corn or in ca..c the local denuml fur .<-<!. producers may 'bt.,iu written authority to sell tin' com to private individuals !'ur i* d u— duly. yet, but that there must be a hundred or more. A. L. Swansea, who lives northeast of Armstrong, was husking com near the road the other afternoon when I was In the neighborhood, so I stopped for a short visit with him. Incidentally snapping cut a few as we were talking as I hate to take up a man's time when he Is busy unless I can help him a little. Tom Rowel, who lives a few miles north of the community hall, is one of the several farmers who have be^n unable to find a farm for the coming year. Mr. Bowel has some large boys who with himself and the full line b machinery they own are able and capable of handling a farm of from 32f to 640 acres, but would be glad to a farm of smaller proportions. Ncls Swanson who lives hi the neighborhood northeast of Armstrong, WBS picking up old boards, etc.. left from moving and repairing his corn crib Nels and hte helpers moved the double c:rn crib to a new concrete 'oun- datlon north of the old site, after which they put In new braces, studd- townshlp's capable young farmers, was rebuilding part of his grant elevator the other afternoon when I was there. Lea said his back had been bothering him an awful lot lately and that he guessed he would have to go to Falr- mont for a few chiropractic treatments to see If they would help him. He has one man hired to pick com and would like to hire another good picker. Fred Barney, wHo b abo one of the young fattners In the neighborhood northeast of Armstrong, is farming 160 acres owned by the Metropolitan Insurance Oo. The company has built an entirely new set of buildings on this place this summer. The Barneys are now living in a fine new large chicken house, which of course will be used for chickens as soon as the resident house is finished. Fred said he was pretty sure they would be all (settled in the new house in time for Thanksgiving dinnrr. contract fulfillments. Any signer will ing, sills, and siding where'meded be allowed the privilege of selling his ~ material at any time to any buyer at any price satisfactory to him. If, however, he is unable to find a buyer by April 1, and the government has not previously sent him an order for the contracted material, satisfactory settlement will be made. All the signer la asked to do in case he sells hLs contracted tonnage, or a portion of it. to report the sale to the Forage is Conservation office at Waterloo, Iowa However, if the government gives a bona fide order and the contract sign- i er has his material ready for shipment or the fleld man In hia territory has made every effort and provision for him to have th-? material ready, and he refuses to deliver because he Intends to hold his forage in an effort :o secure a higher price than the government guarantee, the government will con.sidcr his contract automatically cancelled. November 7th has been set as a ten- ative date for signing contracts. Tills will give anyone who desires to sign i contract ample time and he should be able by then to estimate the approximate tonnage he will have. >. Dakota Governor To Buy Seed Here The demand has been growing for orage feed In South Dakota. Late last w:ek word was received bv G. A. l)cnn- tetter, county agent, that Governor Tom Berry, representative of the Fedral Emergency Belief Administration '•t the state of South Da'..ou would be lere. Arrangement have been made to s*nd a man here who will meet farm- rs who have forage crops for sale, fhey will operate through the local of- nce and will be here to me,-t farmers 8, 9 and 10th. New Dairy Bulletin How U) lu.ik'.- ih able feed .••':.! |/. ;<•• lution is <->;ul '.i:!. . "Feeding Dairy C .i yr:i:i-l->ruimlit Are ailab! • iroin the c Notice of Dissolution I'O WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given that the tossuth County Implement Co., whose Tincipal cilice is located at Algona, owa, by unanimous consent of all ht- stockholders wus di-^lved according to law on the lolh day of October, 11)34. Dated at AJgona, Iowa, thi.i 2ati. flay of October, 1U34. C. L. BUELL, President. H. C. tmiUCKMAN. Hec'v. 44-47 No IK I '' ' ' ^ In ) M IT M XV i 'i i.N'i-KI::, bt-M use of avail- in the rjnirv cuw'.;l in ;t ih-,v bulli-lin.l lie 111 Drought and ' which i.s now ;; i p - unty agent. Notice of Probate of Will Iu IMMiIcl Couit, No. 38B7, S-jj'rln- ber Term. 1934. Stale of luuu. Ko.-,- tuth C'Uiiity. .ss. Tu All Whom It May Cuncc-ni: You are her by noliiird that an iiu'rujnriit cf writing puiportniK Iu be ti.e la.-.t Will and T>.>[.ui.ent nf V. J bcinchU, dtct'iiit.d, tiu'id Ai>nl 13. Iiy31. having been this day tiled, o|jeui-il and r ad. Monday, the laili day ul Noveii;bei', 1934, ia fixed lor hearuiK \n'^A of Same ut the Court Hotiiie in Al^uiiLi. Iowa, before IU-. l^.-Uicl Court of said County, or uio Clerk oi ^>aid Court; and at nine u'clock A M. oi the day above mentioned all perioik, luUn-il- ed are herx-by notiiied and required to appear, and sliuw cau.-x.- it any they have, Why aaid iiutrunn-nt ;.liuuld noi bu probated and allj.wd u^ aaid lur Uie last Will and Ti^Laineui. of iaid dtixaaed. Dated at Algoua. Iov.a Uciobur J4. E. J. MfKVOY. Clerk of Dlitric: Cuuit ALMA PEAll&ON. l*|)uty , L Bonar. atturwey. 43-4-1 -^i From what I could see it should now be almost as good as an entirely new building. George Moore was basking corn In the field Just east of the farm buildings the other afternoon when I stopped there so I walked out to locate him which was some Job because the ccrn stalks were so large that one of them would almost hide a man and wagon. Well, maybe we could deduct a little on the wagon part, but Geo. sure has a fine fleld of com which he says la going at least 60 bushels to the acne and that is aometrungr this year when the average run la from 35 to 40. Mr. Moore is a great believer in sweet clover and gives credit to t!he same for the wonderful crops he has be-.n raising. —o— Carl Loivcnberg and his wife were n the field operating their corn picker he other day and as Carl was oiling the machine- I stopped to talk with them a few minutes with the re.-ult that they are now reading "Icwa's Best Weekly" which is published in this county for the enjoynv.nt and enlight- ment of our thousands of readers of the large family of The Algona Upper De,s Moines. Carl said he didn't know whether he would pick all of his corn with the- picker this year or not but that the field they were then in had a few burr.s in it which would make it rather uncomfortable to husk by hand. II. M. Patterson, who Uves northeast of Armstrong was doing a little repairing on his corn cribs the other day when I stopped at his place. Don't know how Herb's com Is this year, but it must, be pretty good the way he is fixing tilings up. I also noticed that he has put in a lot of new fence around the farm this y*ar. Halsman BroH., who operate two large farms northeast of Armstrong, sure have a dandy herd of Hereford cattle which I could not help stopping to admire when driving past their north farm thi other afternoon. —o— Carl Ode in who lives in the neighborhood northeast of Armstrong was ju.st corning out from duiner the other day when I stopped tr.c-re and of course wj.s in fine humor a.s I .-iiould judg?.- lie always LS. We ctidn't, vuit so very long a:s Carl had ju.st had a f..-w U-etli pulled aud the cold air made hu jawo .idle. — o — K J. Nielsen, who U one of Eagle COLWELL BROS. Aucts. Graduate of Jones Nat 1 !. Sfhool AuuUniaering, Clnoiiio, 111. -1 years, ac.ual .-i-lhn,,' experi- 1.1.•-».•. W :,,r,M a jjavt of ti.e bu>,iae.,j in this u-rnto-y 11. M. Colwtil located hr;>[ t/act- we.;t ot junction Hi'J ana lb. 40-if Harry Seeleys of Irvington Moving N. W. of Whittemore Irvlngton: It was with regret that friends learned recently that Mr. and Mrs. Harry Seetey are planning on leaving this community in about two weeks and will make their future home indefinitely with Harry's parents, northwest of Whltteinore just over the line In Palo Alto county. Mrs. Fran! Seeley. Harry's mother, suffered a bro ken hip some time ago and with othe physical ailments Is now confined to iKr bed and requires the care of a trained nurse. It is to help care fo- his mother that the family is moving Mrs. Seeley has been prominent in al farm bureau activities and also club work. For thr-re years she was township chairman of the woman's farm bureau wcrk and is now president o: the Plum Creek Literary society. The good wishes of the community are extended to them in their new home Last Saturday the Wilfred Johnson family moved to Algona. Mrs. Matt Kelley has been ill at her home on the Airline south of Algonn. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ditsworth and daughter, IdaBelle of Burt were the ruests Sunday at the Frank Ditsworth horn*. The Aid society will entertain the Sexton Ladks Aid Thursday at the Annex. Each Aid member may also 'nvite a guest. The four year old son of Sebastian Kramer was taken sick Saturday and an emergency operation was perform- d for rupture. On Monday Ted Hudson, youngest •on of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hudson, cele- >rated his 9lh birthday. His brother, Oran and wife were guests for the vening. Frank Kajcwskl has ibeen, ill the last week with blood poisoning in his Several cases ot flu have also been reported. Mrs. Armor Lempke waa taken sick Monday and confined o her bed. Irvington now has a new blacksmith. Ar. Mathkon vacated Friday and a Mr. Edwards took possession Saturday. The Edwards family came from Livermore and will live In the west portion of the David Blythe house. It was rumored here last week that Carl Selp west of Hobarton farmer, had purchased the Wm. Hutledge farm of 60 acres just west of Irvlngton at the 1 foot of the hill. However, possession will not be given until another year. A large shipment of Hereford cattle waa received In Irvlngton Saturday. Henry Elscheld received two carloads and Barney Frankl four or about 160 (head. They all weighted about) 700 pounds and were purchased In western Nebraska. They will be used for feeders. Lou Schlchtl quit working for th? Johansen construction crew last Saturday and commenced picking com on Monday morning. Paul Dremmel Is now working for the Johannsens and at present they are working to complete the barn on the Perry Phillips farm. Joe and Dorothy Lage, children of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Lage. -entertained a number of Irvlngton's younger set ast Friday evening at an oyster stew. Guests, who enjoyed the courtesy wtre Donald, Kenneth and Phyllis Asa, Ivabelle Miller. Mary Meyers, Crisy and Martha Olson, Stanley Egel and Bobby Oeigel. Lutheran Church M. A. SjMtnnd, pwtor Ohoir rehearsal this evening at 7:30 at the Sellstrom home. The Ladies' Aid will meet tomorrow afternoon at the home of Mrs. Ous SJogren with Mrs. Lionel Hovey. assisting hostess. Oonflrmatjon class Saturday at 9 a. m- Sunday School next Sunday at 10 a. m. Morning worship next Sunday at 11 o'clock. Luther League on Wednesday, Nov. 14. The Every Member canvass will be held on Nov. 25th. Read The Want Ado—It Pays. Spring Seed Short, Survey Indicates The seriousness of the local seed situation lies not only In the fact that seed Is scarce In Kossuth county, but also In the fact that supplies all over Iowa are short, G. A. Bonnstetter, county agent, said recently. The final summary of ihe seed survey conducted by the extension service of Iowa State College with reports from 63 counties indicate that about three-fourth of the farmers reporting do not know where they will get cat seed. Read The Want Ads—It Pays. ELASTIC HOSIERY Comfort, uniform pranura end lOngwMr CM b* obtaliwd only from EUttlc Ho- iltnr Hut b iclcntlfiully contracted from frtih. Ihr. rubbtr «nd the but quality of rtlk wid limn m«t«rUI«. Enry pl*c. of Elastic Hoslwy told to ovr ttom l> nuiwftc* f»«d «p«l*lly for n. wider our on ipKlfic*- floM, «nd ««rr!«i <wr Gu«*ntn at quality and utitfactory «f»lc». Our complete tfock of Seamlan or Saamad Hotter* contltH of: AnUeti. Knea Can, L<gglng> and Garter StocMngi. etc.. In ithe different grade* of '•Ilk and linen. Experienced fftten always oe, duty. Ne charge for consultation and fittings. Reasonable price*. ELASTIC HOSIERY NON-SKID SPOT TAD TRUSSES AIDOMINAL SUPPORTERS SHOULDER IRACES Sorensen Drug Algona, Iowa. USED CARS 1929 Chevrolet coupe 1928 Chevrolet coupe 1929 Chevrolet coach 1932 Chevrolet coach 1930 Chevrolet sedan Expert Repair Work Algona Auto Market West of Court House AUCTION COLTS Carload of Dakota Colte Will be offered at Auction Saturday, November 10 2 o'clock at VICTOR JOHNSON'S Across street from Phillips "66" Service Station on Highway 18 northeast of Algona. Hagg Bros., Prop. Lou Matern, Auct. TERMS: Cash Meeting the Need hi Automobile Liability Insurance Onr Automobile Insurance Protects Ton in Caae Ton CM Hurt A MODERN AUTOMOBILE TRAVEL SERVICE Very reasonable rates. Complete protection Dwelling and Household Goods Insurance Long Hani Truckers and Cargo Insurance Iowa and Minnesota legal requirements (Special rates) Fidelity Bonds—Surety Bonds—Beer Bonds Bonds written at our Algona office Oar Pa-Icy Writing 1 Connections and Company Contracts Permit Us to Write Tour Insurance and Bonds at the Very Lowest Rates Consistent with Reliable Service Brokerage Business Solicited Loans—Real Estate—Rentals—Investments THE ALGONA INSURANCE AGENCY Phone 55 O. R. LaBarre Office located on ground floor 1st door North of Iowa State Bank 45-E. O. W. HORSE AUCTION SALE Next Saturday NOV. 10 - 1:30 P. M. BRITT, IOWA We mil sell 40 head of good work horses and colts, a, span of good mules, at Frank O'Rourk's yard, south of the G. M. & St. P. depot. These are well oroke horses, no branded ones. The will be sold with guarantee. Rohrbach & O'Rourk H. H. Brunmmond, Auct. Ole Peterson, Clerk PUBLIC SALE As I have decided to quit farming I will sell tho following described properly «,n the farm located '/o mile easl and 2'X> miles south of Burt, or six miles north and li/i> miles east of Algona on Tuesday, November 13 Sale starts at one o'clock sharp 9 GUERNSEY CATTLE 9 5 milk cows, some milking, some to freshen soon; 1 two year old heifer; 1 two year old bull; 1 one year old bull; 1 calf. ~2 HEAD OF HORSES 2 One span of black mares, wt. 2800. FARM MACHINERY, ETC. MeCormick hinder, 5 ft. Deering mower, Rock Island KJ-inch sulky plow, Deere Mansur corn planter, 100 rds. wire, three section drag, Iloosier sceder, (Jom King cultivator, walking cultivator, hay buck, hob .sleigh, grinder, Rumley cylinder corn sheller, two hay racks with wagon, box wagon, buz/ saw, Ottowa log saw, Galloway 5 h. p. engine, Galloway No. 8 cream separator, Kxcele- tone self-player piano, with 75 records, power washing machine, Plymouth Rock chickens, 1} sets of breeching harness. Other articles too numerous to mention. TERMS—Cash. No property to be removed until settled for. JAKE GODDEN, Prop " ' " Bros., Aucts. R. F. Donovan, Clerk. Winter Per ft or/name Guarantee* IOO%Paraffin.Base...Sub-Zero Cold Test GOES FARTHER-LASTS LONGER-COSTS LESS PER MILE lOll 31 Quidwr Storting PWmUr Motor Fusl

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